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Rottweiler puppy help

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by mandy658, May 26, 2010.


  1. mandy658

    mandy658 PetForums Junior

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    I have a 6 month old Rottie pup and she's absolutely adorable but has just recently started biting when you first come through the door it's not like she's trying to hurt you it's almost like she's so excited and want's you to notice her straight away. Anybody else have this problem and any advice on how to correct it?
     
  2. Magnus

    Magnus Keeper of a crazy little red dog!

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    Shout out in (mock) pain and just stand still. It should shock her out of it. My Leonberger pup did it a lot and even the verbal shock shout thing didn't work. A tap on the nose stopped it dead but I don't want to set the psycho-babble mumbo-jumbo merchants off again so try the verbal route ;)
     
    RAINYBOW likes this.
  3. Leah84

    Leah84 PetForums VIP

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    we keep a squeaky ball by the door and as soon as we open it squeak the ball and throw it to distract her then once we`re in and she`s calmed down she gets treats and attention for focussing on the ball rather than our arms
     
  4. mandy658

    mandy658 PetForums Junior

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    Thanks for the advice, I'll give it a try!
     
  5. Danielle P

    Danielle P PetForums Member

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    Hi Mandy,

    Have you read Jan Fennels books. This sounds like something she describes in there. At the moment Im reading 'The Dog Listener' I bought it off Amazon for about £3. I think its brilliant.
     
  6. Colette

    Colette PetForums VIP

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    The Dog Listener is a pretty good read - if you accept that the entire theory is completely wrong and read it as fiction.
    Fennel blames every single thing on "dominance" when there is no evidence of any such thing.

    The pup is attention seeking. Any attention she gets when she does it is therefore rewarding, and thus increasing the behaviour.
    Remove all attention (no talking, eye contact, touching, turn away if necessary) and you remove the reward, and therefore remove all motivation for the behaviour.

    My advice - when you walk in the door, she will do her thing. As soon as she nips, yelp in pain as Magnus suggested, then becoming like a living statue. Do not move, touch her, talk to her, look at her. Look pointedly in the opposite direction, even turn your back if necessary. And wait.

    You can expect an "extinction burst". This is where the behaviour gets worse before it gets better - the behaviour has "worked" for her in the past, and she doesn't know why it doesn't work this time, so tries harder.
    It's like when the batteries go on your TV remote and your first reaction is to press the buttons harder!
    Don't worry this stage shouldn't last very long.

    Does your pup have a reliable "sit"?
    If so - As soon as the bad behaviour stops, look at her again and tell her to sit. As soon as her bum is on the ground you can give her the attention she wants. This way she learns that the only way to get the attention is to sit nicely, and being obnoxious gets her ignored.

    Adding the sit makes the process more effective because you are giving her an alternative behaviour - ie telling her what she should do, not just what she shouldn't.

    I would also suggest lots of practice (in short bursts obviously) not simply doing this when you actually come home. Go out and come in a few times, just for the sake of the training. Do it maybe two or three times, a couple of times a day.

    Good luck!
     
  7. sailor

    sailor PetForums VIP

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    Sailor has never really had a nipping problem, but at about 4 months old, he started to nip when I greeted him and fussed him.
    I just shouted NO stood up straight, folded my arms and looked away from him, completely ignoring him.
    He jumped up a cauple of times, but I just stood completely still, arms folded, looking away from him... he soon got bored and settled down, and just sat looking at me all sad, I then instantly gave him a fuss and if he tried to nip, or got over excited, I would shout NO, stand up, and fold my arms again, completly ignoring him.. it wasnt long before, he would just sit and wait for a fuss, because he knew that was the best way to get my attention and a well deserved fuss and belly rub :D

    Also, I would suggest not greeting the dog as soon as you walk in... with Sailor, i walk in, put bags down, go to the toilet, do what I have to do , then he waits for me to fuss him ... and it doesnt matter if he has had to wait 5 seconds of 5 hours (exaggeration) before getting his first fuss after I have come home, he knows his waiting for it,and when he gets it, he loves it
     
  8. JjPhoenix

    JjPhoenix PetForums Member

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    its normal behaviour at this age with any breed, obviously some more than others such as rotties, collies, staff's, mastiffs, labs, etc. And the dominance stuff is a pile of pooh, along with thinking smacking a dog on the nose will help! well it will if your too lazy to train a dog properly...

    the ball thing is a good idea, what we did was possible simpler, just walk in, arms folded and completely ignore puppy dont even look, until you get inside. once calm give praise and affection. If pup gets over excited again and starts mouthing, just stand up quickly, spin around fold arms and ignore. ask pup to sit (or once youve taught automatic sit your pup will offer this anyway) then praise and give love again.

    another thing you can do is teach an 'automatic sit' which will take about hmm half hour tops?
    ask puppy to sit, then give affection when bottom is on the floor. rinse and repeat x 5.
    then stand there and dont say anything, just look at puppy. because of what you've just done above, puppy should think about it for few secs then sit. repeat again x 5.
    now go out the room, walk in and do the same thing. when puppy sits, affection given. x 5.
    then go out the front door, walk back in through your hallway and into wherever you next go and same thing.

    ta da! now keep this up when ever you come back, no affection til bum hits floor and then this is what pup will do.

    ignore in hallway when you first come in get everyone to. This will help in several ways, it will lower excitment levels when you first come in, meaning when your pup is bigger you wont be battling at the front door with shopping, also its great for visitors as they dont get mobbed for affection on the doormat. also it can help prevent over excitment when the post comes, etc.

    the key to this is consistencey and you will get quick and nice results.
     
  9. Starlite

    Starlite PetForums VIP

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    all that yelping and making "0uch" noises havent worked for me.

    She does this to my OH when he comes in from work and if she continues mouthing him i put her in the kitchen and leave her for 5 mins ignoring her barking.

    After the 5 mins she comes out and wants petted still but she approaches in a calm manner :)
     
  10. mandy658

    mandy658 PetForums Junior

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    Thanks for all the advice, I have been telling her to sit when I come through the door and her nipping did stop for a while she just seems to have started again! I'll keep being persistant, she can be stubborn as hell when she wants to be maybe she is just trying to test me in a way!
     
  11. shazalhasa

    shazalhasa PetForums VIP

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    I've only ever done bite training with young pups. To help keep it up, I alse train them the 'gentle' command so that if they mouth when playing I can simply say 'gentle' and they stop.

    It might be worth teaching your rottie to be gentle when taking treats or toys and use the command when you come home. Rotties are pretty intelligent so should pick it up quite quickly.
     
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