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Resident cat stopped using litter

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by YukiandWolfy, Oct 31, 2019.


  1. YukiandWolfy

    YukiandWolfy PetForums Newbie

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    Hello everyone,
    I have a major issue here.
    I have a new kitty friend for my shy, calm resident cat(1 year old)
    Everything is OK, they are not best of friends but they play together. When little one gets to rough the older just lives.
    The issue here is that since I have the new kitty the resident cat stopped to use the litter tray. I have 3, 1 on every floor. The little one goes to all of them and the older refuses to use any of them...instead she come to bed to pee
     
  2. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    First thing to do is rule out urinary tract problem. Stress (such as a new cat or kitten) can cause a cat to develop a UTI or pH imbalance leading to crystal formation or simply stressed induced cystitis (inflammation).

    Other than that you might try putting two boxes next to each other on each floor? Be sure to have enough resources for two cats, enough elevated spaces, beds, feed them each in their own spot.

    Are both cats spayed/neutered?
     
    Sandra Christiana likes this.
  3. YukiandWolfy

    YukiandWolfy PetForums Newbie

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    Yes they are both neutered.
    I have 3 boxes, one on each floor
     
  4. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Yes I understood that. I am suggesting you add another box on each floor, having two boxes on each floor. It may be she objects to sharing a box with the younger cat. And since the kitten is using al three boxes, you want to give her more choice of where to toilet..
     
    chillminx likes this.
  5. YukiandWolfy

    YukiandWolfy PetForums Newbie

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    OK, thank you, I will try that
     
    lorilu likes this.
  6. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Yes, but she should see a vet too. Be sure to feed both cats a rotation of good quality wet foods. (in separate spots) No kibble.
     
    chillminx likes this.
  7. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    I agree with lorilu, your adult cat is stressed due to the arrival of the kitten and the kitten taking over her litter trays. Add more litter trays as advised, and have your adult cat seen by the vet in case she has a stress-related urinary tract infection or cystitis.

    If she has a UTI or cystitis she will be associating the trays with pain and hence avoiding them. She pees in your bed because it has a strong scent of you and she finds it reassuring to mix her scent with yours. She is scent-marking your bed with her urine because she feels her territory and resources are being threatened by the arrival of the kitten.

    Please do all you can to reassure your adult cat there are enough resources for her, by more than doubling everything you provide for the cats (e.g. litter trays, water bowls, scratch posts, scratch pads, cat beds, high up places to rest, cat trees, toys etc)

    Also give the cats their own permanent feeding spots, out of sight of each other. If you can manage a microchipped feeder for the adult cat, even better, so she feels her food resources are kept safe for her.
    (Fetch is cheapest for the feeders atm, with 15% off first orders and free delivery)
     
    #7 chillminx, Oct 31, 2019
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2019
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