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i am hoping to bring home rescue dog in a couple of weeks a 12 month old cocker spaniel. she is nervous and not fully house trained. i was thinking of getting her a crate so she could have a place to relax and feel safe in. at the moment she is in kennels, she isnt crate trained. can i close the door on her crate at night due to her not being house trained. or should i not do this until she is use to being inside the crate, with thanks.
 

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personally i am not a fan of crates, that said we do have on here just in case of emergencies. the last time i brought it into the house was when we had a rescue dog here, but it was my own eldest dog that decided it was his a he used to go in it. if i had to use one for some reason i would never close the door.

perhaps you could see how he settles before you decide, he might be totally different away from kennels once he feels secure
 

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I treat my Rescues like puppies and assume they know nothing. So I start house-training from Day One - and also leave them alone to settle in.
My dogs sleep where they want - usually on the dog bed in my room because they feel safe there.
A new home is very stressful. The dog doesn`t know you are nice. So please don`t walk the dog, don`t take her training, don`t have the neighbours in to say hello, don`t ask the family round.... not for a few days anyway.
Give her time. Let her explore at her own pace.
 

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I have never housetrained an adult dog but we took on a rescue dog a couple of months ago. I would say its a good idea to have an area that the dog can make hers where she feels safe and where you know she is OK. At some point you will need to leave her to go out and you may have to shut her away from visitors at first.

We bought a dog-gate for the utility room and it has been a godsend for our rescue dog. The utility room has a vinyl floor and nothing that really can be chewed. Bertie has his bed, his toys and his water bowl in there. He sleeps in there overnight, we shut him in there when we go out and its his safe place if the kids are playing and he needs to get out of the way.

I know of people who use crates successfully but if your dog is timid you will need to build this up gradually and I certainly wouldnt shut her in there if she isnt happy. Bertie travels in the car in his crate but thats all we use it for.
 

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I use a crate but have never used it for house training purposes. I've house trained 2 adolescent dogs and with both I just went back to basics as if they were tiny puppies. Lots of trips outside, lots of opportunity to get it right and get big rewards and practically no opportunity to make a mistake.
 

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As others have suggested, I would suggest you just go back to basics as if you were training a puppy. Take her outside regularly (maybe every hour, at least initially), especially first thing in the morning and upon waking from a nap.
Give lots of enthusiastic praise and some treats, and she will learn quickly.

Here is a Dogs Trust Guide on more of the basics:

Dogs Trust - Basic Housetraining
 

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i am hoping to bring home rescue dog in a couple of weeks a 12 month old cocker spaniel. she is nervous and not fully house trained. i was thinking of getting her a crate so she could have a place to relax and feel safe in. at the moment she is in kennels, she isnt crate trained. can i close the door on her crate at night due to her not being house trained. or should i not do this until she is use to being inside the crate, with thanks.
If she has never seen or been in a crate and is a nervous dog, you cant just put a dog in a crate and close the door. You have to introduce and train them to accept the crate and view it as a safe place and a den. So if you havent got any idea how to do this you need crate training advice well beforehand.

Crate training is only ever an aid to toilet training, the theory behind it that a dog will not soil their bed or immediate surrounding area, they still have to be taught where to toilet and left in there too long and caught short will likely do it anyway if they are desparate.

Crates after being introduced properly if you are going to use them can be useful if you cant watch a pup or they may be in danger but it should only really be used for shortish periods possible.

Instead take her out as you would a pup, Start at first every 30/45 minutes,
and also after drinking, eating, play and sleeping. When she starts to go, use a word of choice, used every time she should associate the word with toileting eventually and once she does you can use it as a toilet cue getting her to toilet virtually on command in most cases, when she has completely finished lots of praise and treats.

At a year old she should be able to go through the night without problems but for the first few days while settling in to make sure, you could set an alarm half way through and just pop her out if you want to make sure. Or you could even see if she will go through for a day or so, and if she doesnt then do it if needed at first until she is fully toilet trained and got the complete concept. Which may well be the best way. As long as shes in an area where its easy to clean up shouldnt be a problem if she does have an accident anyway. Ive had rescues who have been completely toilet trained but have had one or two accidents in the first day or two. Its a lot of work at the beginning but it usually pays off before not too long.

ETA, if she does have an accident dont tell her off, it can make them nervous about going in front of you and more likely to try to sneak off and do it unseen. Just clear it up with no fuss like its no big thing. Also make sure you clean up with a pet stain/odour remover as any smells left can sometimes encourage reapeats.
 

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I agree with the other posters here. With the crate, I suggest you leave the door open and let her explore it inher own time before considering closing the door. This could take several days or longer. With our pup he was very anxious at night time and barked and scratched all night. The crate works well for us, but it was a few days letting him adjust to it before we shut the door. I put treats in there to coax him in. Some suggest putting the meals in there, but perhaps wait until he is eating happily in his new home. Good luck. Remember slow but steady wins the race.......
 

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We rescued our 3 year old Rottweiler last year and as far as we were aware, she had never been crate trained. She was brilliant in the house in every way except for when we would leave her and she would have an accident so after a couple of weeks of not getting very far, we introduced her to a crate and she loved it.

We put it in the kitchen where she slept at night and at first, left the door open for a couple of nights before closing it. We would crate her at night and when we went out and she was far more settled.

We weaned her out of it about 4 months after getting her and (touch wood!), we've not had an accident since. We moved the crate into the living room as part of our dog / cat relationship building and put a cover over it and Roxy (the dog) will take herself into the crate most evenings and stay there until it's bed time because she feels so comfortable and secure in it. She could pick anywhere else in the downstairs of the house to snooze and that's where she chooses.

I know not every dog takes to it so well and I can only speak from my own experience, but it was a God-send for us and Roxy. I would never use the crate as a form of punishment though if the dog is naughty because it must remain as something that is nice for them.
 

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I took on a 12 months old cocker who was not house trained. Like others have already said, the best way is to treat her like a puppy and introduce a crate very slowly and carefully. Take her outside more times than you actually think is necessary during the day. Give her plenty of praise when she gets t right but be prepared for accidents in the house for several weeks maybe even months.
Best of luck. :)
Is she a working cocker or a show type?
 
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