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Remote Training Collars

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Jindoman, Aug 11, 2009.


  1. Jindoman

    Jindoman PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all,

    Just been browsing through the web for dog training tips and stumbled on these training collars that innitiate loud beeps by remote.

    has anyone used these?how effective are they?
     
  2. alphadog

    alphadog PetForums VIP

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    There are a few different types of remote collar defined mainly as spray collars or e-collars (that give vibration or even a smal shock to the dog). In both cases, the expensive versions of both collars emit a warning beep.

    Which type are you looking at? And what sort of training are you planning?
     
  3. Jindoman

    Jindoman PetForums Newbie

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    Well i was looking at the long disatnce recall aspect.

    where i stay there is acres of free land, unfortunatley with that comes animals,

    the dog is taking to his training brilliantly but completely zones out when he see's sheep or rabbits ect

    as i say i dont no how effective these e collars are or wither it is worth trying.
     
  4. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    The only thing i will say about e-collars, is that anyone contemplating useing one should have their dogs heart fully tested before hand. This means bloodtests and an ECG. If a dog has an underlying heart problem, a shock could kill.

    I personally hate them, and think a vibrating, beeping, or spray collar as much safer and kinder. They work more through shock and distraction, rather than via pain.

    Never used one myself.

    What breed of dog? going my your user name id say Jindo, but i dont want to assume.
     
  5. Jindoman

    Jindoman PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry i should have mentioned its not the shock one i want.

    i completely argree with the distraction aspect. i believe that all i need is a beeb/vibration to be able to assist me on this.

    i recently bought a whistle and tried assosiating it with 'play' but im afraid he blanks that to.


    Yes it is a Jindo :)
     
  6. alphadog

    alphadog PetForums VIP

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    Please steer away from the e-collar unless you have exhausted every other training possibility. The spray collar is just as effective but you should seek professional help with that too

    I don't want to sound like the sheep police here! but your dog should always be on a lead near livestock. Farmers have the right to shoot dogs that are worrying their animals
     
  7. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    They are stunning dogs. Being hunters by nature, i think they have a high prey drive, a bit like huskys.
    Maybe a longline around livestock would be safer, and offlead where its safe.
     
  8. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    On lead near sheep, certainly. I normally keep mine off lead near cattle so she can run away if they charge. There have been recent cases of dog walkers being injured and even killed by cattle that went for dogs. And farmers don't have to wait until their stock is being worried before they shoot, an off-lead dog that accidentally startles sheep and makes them run can be shot.
    I've used a spray collar that to stop my dog invading football games, it has been totally effective, but your dog has to be sensitive to that sort of correction (though not so much as to be traumatised by it). Your timing has to be spot on.
     
  9. Jindoman

    Jindoman PetForums Newbie

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    Right,

    I appreciate the comments but lets square up here.where i live is completely rural.sheep are fenced of but doesnt stop the dog trying to get near them

    Rabbits are everywhere and occasionaly you get animals within the walking area's due to damaged fencing ect.

    i dont let the dog off the lead in farmers fields.

    The idea of this is to break the dogs natural drive.I will exhaust every avenue before trying this hence why im asking for opinions at the moment.
     
  10. Colliepoodle

    Colliepoodle PetForums VIP

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    If you're not talking about an Ecollar or a spray collar but one which just beeps, then the beep in itself is going to mean nothing to the dog unless you train it to associate that sound with recalling immediately - and that to me is no different to using a whistle :confused:
     
  11. alphadog

    alphadog PetForums VIP

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    Sorry, didn't mean to cause offence or make you feel like you had to defend yourself, there wasn't much info in your posts and I mistakingly jumped to the wrong conclusion

    Agreed ^^ and it could be a costly experiment. Let's take e-collars out of the equasion and look soley at spray collars :) Some of the more expensive brands incorprate a bleep function as well as a short and long spray. The idea is that the spray interrupts the dog from what otherwise is a fixed mindset (you'll probably already read about that on t'interweb) by squirting a foul smelling, cold, hissing spray just infront of the dog's face. This will make them forget what they're doing, even if just for a split second and that's when you recall, praise and reward.

    Sounds easy but your timing has to be perfect (in your case, the second he spots his quarry and starts to bolt) and you need a very strong recall other wise he will learn to accept the 'punishment' and then carry on as before, battling through the sprays.

    Another factor to consider is that the spray doesn't always have a lot of impact of a breezy/windy day, so your training sessions have to be well planned.

    If you introduce the collar in a relatively mundane situation (on a walk, but on a lead for eg) and press the bleep button just before you spray, he will soon associate the bleep with the ensuing spray. After a few goes, the beep should be enough of a warning in itself.

    I've had success with a spray collar for a mixture of problems with a few dogs. Whilst i wouldn't recommend everyone tries one, if you know that you've exhausted every other option and you've got a strong reward system in place to help correct the chasing, then perhaps give it a try
     
  12. Colliepoodle

    Colliepoodle PetForums VIP

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    I would also add that you really need to get some help from a trainer who is experienced in using such collars, whether you opt for spray or Ecollar (if indeed you opt for either; personally I think if it's done right you should be able to sort it without using aversives but that's JMO).

    I am not COMPLETELY against aversives - but I think unless your timing is spot on it is easy to teach the wrong thing and make things worse. Depending on what you're trying to teach, it is possible to make things MUCH worse. Using an E-Collar on a dog who chases sheep, for example, unless you get it absolutely right, can cause the dog not to associate CHASING with the stimulus (shock), but to associate it with the sheep themselves and you could go from a dog who chases sheep not because he necessarily wishes them harm, but because it's fun, to a dog who HATES sheep and will power through the stim/spray to get to one...
     
    alphadog likes this.
  13. cassie01

    cassie01 PetForums VIP

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    i just want to warn you that using any type of puishment for chasing can actually make the problems worse.

    If we se rabbits as and example the dog sees the rabbit, starts to run, gets punished (which is a bad experiance for the dog) the dog then associates the rabbit with the punishment and although some dogs may decide to leave the rabbits alone (beause they are scared of it) some will decide the rabbit is the cause of this upset and needs stopping so then try to kill it even more.

    It can also cause rediredcted aggression and the dog may beome aggresive to other animals/people, it may even decide to chase cars instead just to fulfill the desire to chase

    I would only use punishment for this type of behaviour if all else fails!!

    for now keep your dog on a long line so you always have control, try distrations instead or train him to chase something else such as a ball or a teady on a string so he can learn what he is and isnt allowed to chase. If chasing is put on command a dog is more likely to stop chasing other things as without a command there will be no treat for them in the end.
     
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