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Recent Diagnosis : Hip dysplasia :(

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Lisa2701, May 15, 2010.


  1. Lisa2701

    Lisa2701 PetForums VIP

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    Hi everyone,

    First of all i'd like to say hi (just joined the forum). The reason i joined is because i have a Clumber Spaniel dog (Toby), he is 3 and only yesterday he was diagnosed with hip dysplasia, which to be fair i know VERY little about. I didn't get any scores for him, but i asked the vet on the scale of things how bad was it and her reply was " on a scale of 0(being the best) and 10(being the worst) she'd rate him about 7-8 :frown:, i have to say i'm pretty devastated for him, he is such a jolly little soul and it breaks my heart to think of the pain and discomfort he is going to have to put up with. Luckily the vets i use is one of the best in my area and they have a specialist orthopaedic vet who i am now booked in to see and speak to, but he is on a three week holiday just now so i have been told to keep Toby's exercise short and sweet (but regular) and given painkillers for Toby for the time being to keep him happy. On top of that they think he may have an inflammatory muscle disease that they want to test for. I was hoping that there may be some more experienced people here who could give me some advice, of just share there experiences with me about Hip Dysplasia, any useful hint and tips to keep him comfortable etc.

    Many thanks

    Lisa x
     
  2. keeleyjane19

    keeleyjane19 Guest

    Hey.

    Have you asked if you can see a specialist?

    Plus you want to get a definate score.

    If its really bad I think there is a surgical procedure they can do.

    I'm not sure how to make him comfortable, you need to find out if mobility or rest will help him comfortable.

    If its mobility, maybe consider hydrotherapy?

    My dogs don't have this condition but I know quite a few that do xxx
     
  3. keeleyjane19

    keeleyjane19 Guest

    And welcome to the pet forums, there are some smashing people on here, so kind and considerate and very helpful!! xxx
     
  4. sue&harvey

    sue&harvey PetForums VIP

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    Hi and welcome, I'm sorry to hear your little lad having a rough time. I can't offer any advice but didn't want to read and run. There is some great advice to be had on here and hopefully someone with experience of this will be along soon. Best of luck to you and your lad :)
     
  5. julianne

    julianne PetForums Member

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  6. rona

    rona Guest

    #6 rona, May 15, 2010
    Last edited by a moderator: May 15, 2010
  7. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    Rona, it sounded like the vet was using a 0 to 10 score on how serious the HD is, not a hip dysplasia scoring. As in, how bad is your pain or whatever on a score of 1 to 10
     
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  8. rona

    rona Guest

    Yes thanks, I've been running around and obviously didn't read the post properly. :eek:
    To the OP I hope you can gets some help.
    Hydrotherapy can often help alleviate some of the pain, and also with prevention of muscle wasting
     
  9. Lisa2701

    Lisa2701 PetForums VIP

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    Hi everyone,

    First and foremost thank you for all your kind replies, it is lovely to know that there are so many people who have the same care and compassion for there dogs, few of my friends are dog owners so haven't been too overly interested or understanding to listen to me talking about things.

    Hydrotherapy seems to pop up over and over again no matter what i'm reading so it is definitely something i will be looking into, I know there is a vets maybe half an hour from where i live that can do hydrotherapy so hopefully we can be referred there to start treatment.

    The vet i saw yesterday was a GP vet and NOT my normal vet(who is currently on holiday). My normal vet who i have went to for about 10 years is a specialist orthopedic vet who also specializes in surgery (he actually owns the practice i use). I am booked in to see my normal vet when he gets back from his 3 week holiday, and i have every confidence he will be very good at dealing with this bump in the road we have hit.

    To actually get his hips scored can the vets just use the x-rays they have to do that or how does it all work??

    Thank you julianne for the post you posted on here i have had a good read and it did hold a lot of useful information. I had searched about HD before i posted but hadn't came up with much ( which i though strange at the time given its unfortunately so common).

    Someone has suggested (not from this forum) that perhaps given how bad the vet said it was and the age of Toby (he's still very young) that surgery is somthing i should ask for, as he is young fit and at a good weight (slim for his breed) so they had suggested it may be better to look at that now rather than wait a few years to see how/if it gets much worse. i have read the post on the link that was provided about surgery, but wondered if anyone else had any experience with surgery for HD (although not sure if thats even an option or required yet so its just as a "to keep in mind thing really")?

    I know his left hip is worse than his right. BOTH hips have a badly shaped socket, but the left hip has the added problem that the actual ball that fits into the sock is the wrong shape too and has blunt edged on it. The vets are very surprised that he can get around as well as he does, as to be fair he doesn't show any outwardly signs of HD, i honestly thought it was his back causing him problems rather than his hips, so i was competely shocked when i discovered it was HD and not only that it's bad :(.

    Sorry for rambling, like i said not got many people who will listen :lol: .

    Any advice is greatly welcomed, and thank you for the replies so far.

    Lisa xx
     
  10. Matrix/Logan

    Matrix/Logan PetForums VIP

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    Hi and welcome!

    Sorry to hear your dog has HD, my friends springer has it real bad, when she was 18months old she had one hip replaced then the other one done when the first had healed, it was very much a nightmare time and my friend gave up her job to nurse Gracie but to be honest she has never looked back and runs free now and has a fab life so i think she would definately say the surgery is well worth it if you are offered the chance.

    Have you got any photos of your dog? I would love to see him, i love Clumber they always look so expressive! :thumbup:
     
  11. Dally Banjo

    Dally Banjo PetForums VIP

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    Hi Lisa & welcome to the forum so sorry you arrived here because of Tody's diagnosis though :( its awfull when they are so young its the last thing you expect.

    I can tell you all the things we have done for Banjo & the stuff he has if any use.

    Synoquin - Glucosomine supliment, Hydropherapy & Acupuncture. A Bio flow collar, coat when it is cold & wet, a ramp for the car & a memory foam matress topper for his bed :rolleyes: think thats it.

    Hope all goes better than you expect with the orthapedic vet when you see him x
     
  12. swarthy

    swarthy PetForums VIP

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    Cam I just ask, has he been x-rayed? has he shown symptoms of HD?

    I don't know what the breed average is for Clumbers, but I think it is considerably higher than Labs - so what would be devastating for a Lab breeder could be quite normal for a Clumber.

    I know they are not dogs, but if the worst does happen, and HD is confirmed, this site might give you some tips and advice and demonstrate that there is hope for HD sufferers, even those needing total hip replacements.

    Labrador Health brings you the story of Charlie, the Bionic Pup

    Labrador Health: Your stories

    I don't know what part of the country you are in, but I know of a very good specialist in the Sheffield area, and another in the Cumbria area.
     
  13. Lisa2701

    Lisa2701 PetForums VIP

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    hi again,

    Yes he has had x-rays, the vet let me see them and unfortunately it was clear as day that there was something wrong with the joint. plus, it was my orthopedic vet who done the x-rays and made the diagnosis, problem was he was leaving for his holidays today so was a half day (yesterday) and had left before i was able to get up to pick Toby back up from the vets. The vet that discharged Toby did she she was only a GP vet and that she would prefer me to talk to my usual vet about treatment and long term prognosis, so has given me anti-inflammatory painkillers to keep him happier until my vet returns to work. Its just unfortunate i would pick the VERY last day he was there to get Toby x-rayed.

    Dally Banjo, thanks for letting me know about what you have done for your dog. I have already started looking into orthopedic beds, and hope to source one next Saturday at a large dog show i am going to. Fortunately as i have joint problems (with my hips no less) we live in a house that has no stairs, other than a couple of steps at back door, so i can have my husband build a small ramp if it comes to it that can be left there all the time. I have read about Glucosomine supplement but know little about them, could anyone explain to me how they help? I can also source a good coat at this show i am going to hopefully, but it is hard to get a coat for a clumber (without getting it specially made) as they have such short legs in comparison to there body, but we will sort something no doubt. Do you feel that acupuncture has helped any, i know my insurance covers me if i wanted it done.

    Luckily i do not work so for any treatment (and surgery if necessary) i will not have to worry about taking time off work and can be home 24/7 if required. And my only child is 5 and a half so at school most of the day, so Toby can get any peace he may require.

    I believe the breed average for hips is around 40 ( although i'm not entirely sure). Like i said it was clear as day (even to my untrained eye) in the x-ray that in the left hip his ball and socket were BOTH the wrong shape, and in the right hip the socket was the wrong shape. its hard to describe how it looked (as to be honest i was in a bit of shock and was trying to take it all in and listen to the vet) but it almost looked like, rather than the sockets being a smooth circular socket they looked rough and Jaggy and corroded almost. Sorry i'm not doing the best at explaining. The left hip, the ball part of the joint, had flat/blunt edges on it.

    i live in Scotland, but thanks anyway. I actually have a lot of faith in my normal vet, like i said he is an orthopedic specialist, and he is very experienced and knows both myself and my dogs well. However, i can assure you that if at any point i am unhappy with Toby's treatment i will source another expert in the matter, even if it require traveling.

    Matrix i will try my best to add a couple of pictures:thumbup:.

    Thanks xxx
     

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  14. Lisa2701

    Lisa2701 PetForums VIP

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    Swarthy - sorry forgot to say, thank you for those links, i will be sure to have a good read through them.

    xx
     
  15. rona

    rona Guest

    How old is he and what are the symptoms?
    I used to know a dog that was one of the first to ever have hip surgery (many years ago) It was a working Lab and could go out and work all day on a shoot :thumbup:
    Keeping the dog still after the op is going to very difficult in a very young dog, so if he isn't suffering too much as yet, it may be better to wait if you can.
    It's completely down to what your vet says of course
     
  16. Matrix/Logan

    Matrix/Logan PetForums VIP

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    Loving the photos! :thumbup: Thank you for sharing, he is very handsome!! :thumbup: :thumbup:
     
  17. Lisa2701

    Lisa2701 PetForums VIP

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    yes, he is a very handsome boy, even if i am bias LOL.

    He had just turned 3 years old (birthday last month), and he is a fairly active boy. I know it is early days to be thinking about surgery, and i don't even know if it is going to be necessary to be honest, but i am just trying to prepare myself for "worst case" kind of thing.

    He doesn't seem to be suffering too badly at the moment. He has presented problems since he was about 6 months old, but was assured by 2 -3 clumber breeders (not his breeder) i know that it was normal for a clumber puppy to have "growing pains" if you like. At that point he could go months and months without problems, then after a long walk up the forest he would go lame, but usually a couple of days rest would have him right as rain, then we could have months before the next "episode" if you like, sometimes they would come out of the blue. i always thought that maybe he had just twisted himself, maybe it was too long a walk for him. I am REALLY kicking myself now for being so stupid! Anyway, i did take him to a vet a year ago to have it checked out. unfortunately, i was tight on money (he is insured but i didn't even have the money for the excess if required) and my own vet is one of the dearest, due to being state of the art, so i went to another vet practice to have him looked at, thinking a vet is a vet right?....well wrong obviously, as they told me there was nothing wrong with him, he was just playing up, it was behavioral not physical and sent me on my way. So about 2 months ago i decided to start doing obedience with him (as his manners left a bit to be desired:rolleyes:) but every single week during and after the obedience he would yelp and hobble round about after 20 minutes of work, then take 2-3 days to recover. So i quickly had to give the obedience up. He then had "an episode" (which is what we called it till now) where he was almost frightened to move, you could see he wanted to get up to come say hello, but was frightened to, he was depressed and clearly in a lot of pain, he struggled with the steps at the back door and was acting stiff like an old man and was slightly lame but not much. Plus, looking back, i used to joke about how he looked like an old man if he'd been lying for too long, he was stiff in getting up....... goodness i am so so badly annoyed that i didn't push this years ago!! Long story short, i have taken him to my normal vet, and they agreed that they thought it was his back, but they couldn't rule out his hips, so they took x-rays of both. And theres nothing wrong with his back, the hips are the problem. They also think that he MAY have an inflammatory muscle disease, as when he's having an "episode" it doesn't matter where you touch him, it could be his head, his foot, back whatever, he reacts to it...i think it may just be he anticipates that touch is going to hurt so is yelping in anticipation for pain rather than actual pain if that makes sense??

    My thoughts on surgery (if required) is that surely it would be best to have it done when he was young (if its something he's going to need anyway when he's older) when he's young, fit and healthy, and his weight is easy to control just now (he's actually slightly under weight for the breed, who are supposed to be heavy built), rather than wait until he is older and maybe gained a pound or two (as we all do when we age) and maybe not as healthy?? Plus, i have a 4 year old collie X, and the thought of taking him walks up the forest, and having to leave Toby at home is heartbreaking. If surgery means that Toby could go on to run the fields and swim in the rivers (pain free) with my other dog and live a pain free life for the next 9 years or so (after recovery) then it would all be worth the expense, and hours of nursing to do it??

    Lisa xx

    L xx
     
  18. Matrix/Logan

    Matrix/Logan PetForums VIP

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    I agree with you!

    My parents gsd years ago had HD and surgery wasn't something that was offered then. She did live a reasonably good life, she was put to sleep at the age of 14. She used to come out with my dogs and go swimming in the sea etc. She just had to have lots of rest afterwards and had to be on anti-inflammatories all her life but like i said her quality of life was quite reasonable. I wouldn't say great as she had her bad days but considering she had no hip sockets left at the age of 2 i think she was amazing! :)
     
  19. Mum2Alfie

    Mum2Alfie PetForums VIP

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    Hi Lisa

    Welcome to the forums.

    I am sorry to hear about your doggie. He is gorgious! I hope he get the therapy he can. I dont know much about it I am afraid, but I have heard hydrotherapy is really good, and dogs seem to love it!

    Hope you receive some good advice. They are great on here for advice! :D
     
  20. rona

    rona Guest

    Well with that level of disability and pain, I think I would go for the op sooner rather than later
     
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