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Reasons not to get a dog

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Tanji, Sep 10, 2013.


  1. Tanji

    Tanji PetForums Member

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    Listed below are five of the worst reasons for considering getting a dog; if you can check all five of them off as not being relevant to you, then carry on! If you tick one of the boxes have a rethink



    1. Personal protection


    Dogs are undeniably loyal and protective of their owners, and will often go out of their way even at the risk of injury to themselves to protect their owners from harm. Similarly, many dogs take to the role of guarding the home very naturally, and one of the side benefits of ownership of all types of dogs can be feeling more secure with your dog around, and knowing that they are acting as a deterrent to intruders in the home while you are out. This is all fine, but if you are considering getting a dog simply to guard your property or to make yourself look intimidating when you’re walking down the street, think again. Using your dog as a weapon or to stand in your place in the case of an altercation is not only often illegal, but is completely irresponsible and should be quickly discounted as an idea.


    2. As a fashion accessory


    Small ‘handbag dogs’ may look like cute cuddly toys, but they are still dogs and need to be treated accordingly. You may think that porting a teacup Yorkie or Chihuahua about in a handbag is cute, but how will you feel about cleaning up their poop, feeding them, walking them and training them? There is nothing wrong with appreciating the appeal of a smaller breed of dog, and there is no reason why you shouldn’t carry a small dog in a specially designed underarm pet carrier. But don’t forget that there is much more to it than that, and that you will still need to train them, exercise them and take care of all of their needs in the same way as you would with any other dog.


    3. Because your children are demanding one
    Even if you are not particularly enthusiastic about the idea of having a dog, constant cries of ‘can we have a dog? Can we have a dog?’ from the kids can soon wear down even the most stalwart of parents. Do not give in to your children’s demands for a dog unless you are also fully on board with the decision, and willing to commit to caring for and loving the dog in question for the duration of its hopefully long life- whether the appeal wears off for your children or not.


    4. If you work all day or are away from home a lot


    The idea of coming home to a happy, loving dog that is really excited to see you and lets you know it is an appeal for most dog owners. A dog can make your house feel like a home, and give you something to look forwards to at the end of the day in a way that few other things can. But if you are out at work all day, travel a lot or are not home much, a dog is not likely to be a good fit for your lifestyle. It is not fair on a dog to be left alone for more than a few hours at a time, or to be regularly kennelled or cared for by strangers while you travel about. Consider waiting until your situation changes in the future before getting a dog, to make sure that you can give them the time and the attention that they deserve.


    5. When you can’t afford to make a long term commitment


    You might have lots of free time and enough cash to buy and take care of a dog’s needs now, but are you as sure as you can be that your situation won’t change unduly in the future? What if you got a new job, found a new partner, moved house or had children? Would you still be willing to make your dog your number one priority, and not make any changes to your lifestyle that would adversely affect them or push them out of your life? Are you willing to accept that you may potentially have to miss opportunities, and compromise in many areas to make sure that you do the best for your dog?
    Similarly, funding the cost of owning a dog while they are young and healthy may be well within your reach, but what about as your dog ages and their needs change, or if they were to get ill or injured? Could you still provide for them then? If the answer is ‘no,’ then please think again.
     
  2. Milliepoochie

    Milliepoochie PetForums VIP

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    In an ideal world yes of course I agree with you but we dont live in an ideal world and sadly its not as black and white as this.

    My dog came to me from a house with someone home all day every day - Yet had still never been on a walk at 10 months old and being given away 'free'.

    I know for me personally if I didnt tick number 4 then I couldnt guarantee number 5. :(
     
    #2 Milliepoochie, Sep 10, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
  3. SLB

    SLB PetForums VIP

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    Same as above - I get away with working part time and doing nights so get to spend most of every day with my dogs but if circumstances changed then I would have to have full time work to pay for them.

    And there are worse reasons to get a dog than those too.
     
  4. Tanji

    Tanji PetForums Member

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    Just to clarify. Thought had put on already... this is from a site that is selling dogs, I thought it made pretty good sense in the main hence shared

    Ken
     
  5. SLB

    SLB PetForums VIP

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    There was nothing to say that in the original post though ;)
     
  6. Bramblesmum

    Bramblesmum PetForums Member

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    Hmm yes...

    But you know the reason I got a dog in the first place was pretty naff - and it literally changed my life...

    I was petrifed of dogs, had a real phobia - so my lovely ex husband liked to play on that - verbally attack me because he couldn;t have "his" dog - refuse to have one when I gave in... and over the years things escalated to the point that every night he took our 5/6 year old next door to see their dog - every night my little one was injured - nipped, scratched, pulled into barbed wire fences so that he was developing a major phobia too.

    And that was the reason I decided to get a dog - to help my child with his fears - I didn;t want one, I resented having to get one and was getting one between gritted teeth, thinking I would feed IT, walk IT when I had to but that was it....

    Roll forward 17 years - I now have my third dog who I adore and who worships me like no other, we go to two obedience clubs and my world is soooo much happier and more fulfilled..... I would never in a million years have foreseen that the outcome of that misery was so much happiness and joy and a completely new interest and hobby...
     
    #6 Bramblesmum, Sep 10, 2013
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2013
  7. catz4m8z

    catz4m8z PetForums VIP

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    1. Personal protection

    hmm, I have thought of using them for personal protection but at only 6Ibs I dont think they would be very effective.....no matter how hard I throw them!:D



    2. As a fashion accessory

    Again, tricky....I will admit I do tend to accessorize the dogs to my outfits in that we all wear cheap, scruffy and bargin basement gear!:eek:




    3. Because your children are demanding one

    Children?
    *shudder*



    4. If you work all day or are away from home a lot

    well, I only work 2 nights a week and Im a complete hermit who doesnt like to go out.



    5. When you can’t afford to make a long term commitment

    s'ok...they are all insured and my job is pretty secure. Although if I win the lottery I will be trading them in for posher, prettier dogs obviously.



    Im clearly a brilliant dog owner!
    yeah, for me!!
    :lol:
     
    babycham2002 and Malmum like this.
  8. Donut76

    Donut76 PetForums VIP

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    hahaha that made me choke on my crackers lol
     
  9. considerthis

    considerthis PetForums Member

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    Worst reason has to be status dogs right? My ex friend got 2 American bulldogs and I am disgusted with they are treated like sweet little babies, (the dogs sit on the sofa and the owners sit on the floor, I nearly got bit for trying to sit on that sofa) all dogs are powerful and they need to be treated with respect and correct handling, not as a "hey look at me I'm so cool I got a really hard dog." I got my dogs when I became chronically ill and needed something to focus my time and mind on. Which maybe doesn't sound like the best reason but can think of tonnes worse. @-}--
     
  10. considerthis

    considerthis PetForums Member

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    Made me laugh so much :*)
     
  11. Malmum

    Malmum PetForums VIP

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    Rep for that, cos you actually made this miserable old goat laugh out loud. That's a rarity! :D
     
  12. Scabbers

    Scabbers PetForums Senior

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    What if your working and can support your dog as is? And then a gigantic depression hits and you loose your job and have to go on job seekers allowance?

    I know plenty of people that this has happened to without a hope in hell of finding a new job even if they are qualified to the hilt as a teacher, fireman, nurse and arciologist. They cannot even get a job at mcdonalds :(
     
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