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Raw Feeders - How often do you worm?

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by Themis, Jun 7, 2010.


  1. Themis

    Themis PetForums Senior

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    I've just de-flead my two ready for their cattery stay next week and I'm not sure whether I ought to worm them or not?

    They were last done by the vet in I think March. I'm not sure if they need worming more often because they are raw fed?

    Both are indoor Cat's (unless you count poking their heads out of the gap under the window and giving me a heart attack!)
     
  2. hobbs2004

    hobbs2004 PetForums VIP

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    Surprised no-one has replied! Ok, for it's worth :D

    Non raw feeders tend to say that feeding raw food increases the chance of worms (as well as salmonella, e-coli etc), raw feeders tend to say that it promotes a healthy gut and a stronger immune system (and anyway, cats have a digestive system to deal with salmonella and co).

    Not sure what the scientific evidence is for either claim.

    Anecdotally, our dogs were also raw fed and they were never wormed. They weren't wormed because we would every now and again take a sample of their poo and have it analysed and would only worm if the analyses came back with something. It never did. (This was in Germany, mind, and it actually was cheaper getting the analyses done once or twice a year than to get the worming stuff lol. If anyone knows the prices for doing that over here, then I would very much like to know!).

    Friends of mine who feed their cats raw in Germany do that too.:) They have never had worms (one of them has been feeding raw for the past 15 years and never had anything).

    That is all anecdotal and perhaps a tad controversial. :D. I haven't wormed in a while (1 year) - maybe that makes me irresponsible in some eyes. I will ask my vet how much they charge for a poop analyses for worms.

    Perhaps, one thing to keep in mind is that inadvertently a chemical wormer is quite aggressive on the gut.

    Hope that helps and I am sure someone will be along soon now with a different view :)
     
  3. Themis

    Themis PetForums Senior

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    Thanks Hobbs!

    I tend to want to agree that raw fed Cats aren't more prone to worms and since my two don't get outside I suspect the chances of them having them are actually very slim.

    I think I will leave them be for now.
     
  4. Catlover2

    Catlover2 PetForums Member

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    I was wondering this myself. In the past, I never routinely wormed my cats and never had any problems. I did all mine in Jan this year and thought I might just do them at 6 month intervals. I really don't know..... !
     
  5. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    Another area where I am lax...or not depending on your point of view!
    My old gang never got regular worming....more like if I took one to the vet because of an illness then the vet would check that I was worming regularly. Oh YES, I would answer...then pick up some tablets on the way out!
    New kitten had Milbemax with her first two vaccinations and I have been deliberating about when next to pill her as she is eating a lot of raw.
    Hmm, tricky.
     
    #5 Paddypaws, Jun 10, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2010
  6. Shabbydoll

    Shabbydoll PetForums Member

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    Mine don't have regular wormings either. But maybe it would be a good idea to get that done at their next check up.
     
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