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Ragdoll breeders-red flag or not?

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by MrsClare, Oct 17, 2020.


  1. MrsClare

    MrsClare PetForums Newbie

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    Hello everyone. I am new to the forum but have been browsing the threads for a while whilst doing my research on Ragdoll cats.
    I have read through the sticky post on pedigree cats but I can’t find a definite answer to my query.

    We have decided we would like a Ragdoll kitten in the future. I say in the future as my children are currently very young and I would like to wait until they are older before getting a kitten.

    I have never bought a pet before, I’ve always adopted so the world of cat breeding is very alien to me.
    I assumed that any decent breeder would have a long waiting list which is fine by me as we’re not ready for a kitten just yet.

    I know to avoid BYB etc but I’ve discovered there’s quite a bit of variation in practices between registered breeders, and I’m not sure what is considered a red flag for a disreputable breeder.

    The breeder I’ve found closest to me is registered with the GCCF and the progressive Ragdoll breeders club. The parents of the kittens are HCM and PKD tested, and leave at 13/14 weeks. Two things are concerning me though. Firstly this breeder does not early neuter and instead withholds GCCF registration until evidence of neutering is supplied at 6 months. Is this a red flag or not?

    The second concern is the amount of litters the breeder currently has. It would appear from the website/fb page that she has at least 4 litters at the moment of various ages (all Ragdolls) all supposedly reared in the home. Is this normal for cat breeders? The breeder does appear to be passionate about her animals, but is having lots of queens and lots of litters a concern or not?
    My priority with buying a family cat is that we have a well socialised animal that has been been bred as ethically as possible, I’m very keen not to make a mistake and inadvertently support a BYB.
    Thank you, any expert advice would be greatly appreciated.
     
    lorilu likes this.
  2. spotty cats

    spotty cats PetForums VIP

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    I would only support a breeder practising ESN, withholding papers does nothing to stop bybs.

    Multiple litters are common. Girls tend to set each other off calling, it can be useful having multiple moms should there be an issue with one litter, some also prefer to have litters slightly spaced then have a period of no litters.

    Does the breeder show? Showing is an important part of breeding.
     
  3. gskinner123

    gskinner123 PetForums VIP

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    Withholding paperwork - yes and no. Early neutering is still not a hugely common practice amongst UK breeders simply because most vets do not (or will not, as they don't agree with it) early neuter.

    However the practice of withholding paperwork until proof of neutering is supplied was made a rule break by GCCF within the last few years. Breaking rules obviously creates the wrong impression. However I think you have to ask yourself whether this rule is one that breeders feel passionately about and may feel is the best way available to them to protect their kittens.

    Multiple litters is not at all uncommon. What is important is that every kitten is raised as part the household, handled and played with frequently and used to all of the usual 'goings on' in a home. That becomes harder, the more kittens there are. It can be difficult to gauge how kittens are being raised. 'Home reared' can be as described above, or it can be that kittens are shut in a kitten pen or kept in a room of their own (with little or no interaction) or even in an outdoor cattery.
     
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  4. MrsClare

    MrsClare PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you both.
    So it seems the early neutering issue is something worth asking the breeder about.
    How do breeders tend to feel about being asked questions like this by prospective owners? I don’t want to give offence and imply they are breaking GCCF rules.
     
  5. gskinner123

    gskinner123 PetForums VIP

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    Breeders who don't care very much or even at all, love people who ask few or no questions.

    Any good breeder will expect to be asked lots of questions and there are no 'stupid' questions. The world of cat breeding and pedigree kittens is a rather obscure one! Breeding Ragdolls must be DNA tested for HCM which is unfortunately not uncommon in the breed and why GCCF have the requirement in place. Don't be afraid to ask to see copies of DNA results for each parent and ensure they match the parents shown on your registration document and on the kitten's pedigree. That is somewhat a matter of trust as the pedigree and reg document will not be handed to you until you collect your kitten.
     
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  6. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    For some reason some breeders still think that withholding papers will protect their kittens against BYBs. It doesn't, BYBs are quite happy to breed without the papers which would be on the inactive register anyway.
     
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  7. QOTN

    QOTN PetForums VIP

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    To be fair, the rule banning the withholding of papers until a cat is neutered is a relatively recent one. If she is a long established breeder, she may not even be aware. The rule changes do not seem to be well publicised by the GCCF unless they now send such notifications with registrations. (I have not bred for ten years.) Even the email updates don't seem particularly detailed about rule changes or even alterations to SOPs. Some of us who were/are on committees keep up to date but I wonder how many of the ordinary club members know all the rules. In my experience as a secretary, even important paperwork tends to be overlooked. (After all, kittens are much more absorbing and fun.)

    I did not early neuter my kittens and obviously I think I was a very conscientious breeder. I am not even sure I would if I were still breeding today, although if a possible owner requested it I would be happy to do it.

    Of the owners who broke the conditions of my contract, only one had not neutered on time. I had more problems with people rehoming my cats without consulting me and neglecting to obtain necessary veterinary care.

    Although I did show when I was breeding, I do not think that is an essential requirement in a breeder, especially now when there is no indication when/if shows will take place again.

    The only way to ensure the kittens are socialised is to visit. A good breeder will always be happy for you to spend plenty of time with them.
     
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  8. MrsClare

    MrsClare PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you all I really appreciate the advice. It’s hard to know what is good practice and what isn’t when you’re new to it all.
    I definitely intend to visit the breeder’s premises when the time comes, hopefully it will be far enough in the future that the covid restrictions won’t apply.
    Thanks again.
     
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