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Ragdoll attacks me!

Discussion in 'Cat Training and Behaviour' started by HappyGoth, Dec 9, 2018.


  1. HappyGoth

    HappyGoth PetForums Newbie

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    I’ve had my beautiful Ragdoll a few months - he’s 7 months old now. While he can be very affectionate his behaviour is rather worrying. He can be sitting on my lap having a cuddle and suddenly turn round and bite my arm - not always a nip, but sometimes can be more than this. He hasn’t drawn blood yet! He can also attack my ankles and starts to kick the hell out of them!

    Is this just a kitten phase and he won’t carry on indefinitely - I sincerely hope that! He’s very lively and has several ‘mad’ 10 minutes a day. Has anyone else experienced this sort of behaviour with Ragdoll kittens? I thought they were supposed to be affectionate and relaxing and I was looking forward to having a wonderful relationship and companionship with Loki.

    The cats I’ve had in the past haven’t done this. It upsets me so much when I tell him off and I wonder if he will turn against me and I will lose the trust I have with little Loki

    Any advice would be gratefully received.
     
  2. kittih

    kittih PetForums VIP

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    Hi is your boy neutered ?

    If he is then the fact that he isn't drawing blood means he has good bite inhibition. Cats sometimes bite if they become overstimulated. One of mine used to enjoy some petting but her live of it quickly turned to annoyance. She was rather conflicted about the whole thing. She would bite to stop me petting her. Sometimes I wouldn't need to do much at all before the irritation set in. She would always bite in such a way that she had a firm grip but never break the skin. She knew exactly how much force to exert and I only ever got a bleeding g injury if I tried to pull away quickly.

    I learned to watch her tail closely and if it started to twitch then she was getting over stimulated so I would stop. I also started only having her on my lap onto of a large blanket or cushion. That way if I needed to move she was being particularly sensitive I could move the cushion and her easily off my lap without disturbing her.

    It could also be play. It's sometimes.as worth getting a large kickeroo toy and putting that into their mouths/paws to redirect some of the play.

    How much play and stimulation does he get ?

    If he isn't neutered then his behaviour could well be linked to that.
     
    chillminx likes this.
  3. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    This is normal kitten behavior, usually from a kitten who has not been properly socialized. Sounds like he is being overstimulated.

    The trick is to learn his signals or timing and stop any activity before he gets to the point of biting and scratching. Watch for signs of over stimulation such as ears going back, eyes getting big and black and fixating on your body part, back rippling, tail twitching.

    Also, keep track of when it happens. If he "attacks" after 5 minutes, stop activity at 2 minutes, for example.

    Give him toys he can grab and kick and bite. Put them in his paws before you start the cuddle. This will teach him what it is okay to bite and kick.

    Ensure he is getting adequate and appropriate interactive play time every day.

    Feed a good quality species appropriate diet (no dry food)
     
  4. HappyGoth

    HappyGoth PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you to you both for your advice. Lorilu, why shouldn’t I feed him dry food?
     
    lorilu likes this.
  5. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    Dry food is very bad for cats. It's triple processed, high in carbohydrates and creates a condition of chronic low level dehydration.. Cats are strict obligate carnivores which means they need a diet high in meat, moisture and low in carbohydrates to thrive.

    They don't have the enzymes to properly digest plant material. They don't have the thirst drive to drink enough to make up for the dehydrating effects of an all dry diet, which can elad to urinary tract issues and kidney problems. And the carbs raise their pH level, both in the digestive tract and the urinary tract, leading to life long digestive problems and urinary tract issues. High carb/dry diets also cause diabetes.

    Also, diet matters in behavior. A kitten will still be a kitten, but a cat or kitten on a species appropriate diet will feel better and it will be noticed in his behavior as well.

    Here is some information from a vet who has made feline nutrition her life's work. Dr Pierson is very wordy so my advice is take it in small doses. I still return to this site to learn things even oafter years of reading there. :)

    www.catinfo.org
     
    Eilidh and HappyGoth like this.
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