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Pyometra/hormones and dominance

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Christy053, Dec 6, 2018.


  1. Christy053

    Christy053 PetForums Newbie

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    we rescued a grey SBT on Monday so very early days. A week prior to this she was picked up by the dog warden and found to have pyometra and had the operation the following day. She has been a brilliant dog! The only thing so far is showing dominance over younger dogs, in her foster home she did this to a younger dog which included growling and tonight we have introduced her to a family members 6 month old bitch, they were getting on fine until our dog mounted the younger one. Is this a behaviour that could be due to her operation and a fluctuation in hormones or is it behavioural? Tia
     
  2. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Growling is NOT 'showing dominance'. For heavens sake, she had just gone through major surgery and most likely just wanted to be left alone. In bitches, humping is more usually associated with excitement.
     
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  3. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    humping is not a great idea if she has just had major surgery. She is probably still feeling out of sorts and really not wanting other dogs around her. Just slow down a bit, give her time to get back to normal and then to settle in with you and feel more secure. It could be that she is not keen on other dogs in which case you might have to manage her all her life. I am surprised that she was given to you so soon after surgery.

    Just realised you say she had a foster home between having her pyo and coming to you, all in a week. Poor little sod, what on earth was the fosterer doing mixing her with another dog at that stage.
     
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  4. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    And the rescue who allowed that to happen very much at fault too. How can they have assessed her properly under those circumstances?
     
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  5. Christy053

    Christy053 PetForums Newbie

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    She had her surgery on 24th November, wound was totally healed when we collected her on the 3rd December, the fosterer was lovely and doing everything she can to help dogs that would otherwise be put to sleep I don’t feel she has done wrong. I don’t think I shall bother with this forum again. Come for advice and all you’ve done is judge, thanks
     
  6. ColliePoo

    ColliePoo PetForums Newbie

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    You have had a bit of a harsh welcome haven’t you?

    PP are right that the jumping isn’t dominance - it’s most often general excitement/arousal especially in bitches. Well done for adopting her
     
  7. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    I don't think anyone has been judgemental towards you, blunt maybe. Unfortunately we can only advise on the information you give us , so sorry if you've been offended.
    I hope your girl continues with her recovery and harmony is restored to the household.:)
     
  8. danielled

    danielled PetForums VIP

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    If I may venture an opinion, yes I feel the first reply was maybe a bit harsh. Might I suggest we proof read our posts and imagine if we were new and if need be edit things/reword.. We don’t wish to cause offence after all.
     
  9. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    A surgical incision will not be 'totally healed' in a week. Even if the surface skin looks closed over, the muscles that were cut to access the uterus will be far from healed. Full recovery from a spay takes at least a couple of months.
     
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  10. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    You mean my reply.
    What really bothers me is a dog that's just been through that being handed over to someone who clearly has quite a bit to learn about dog behaviour and what the signals (growling) she was giving out mean. You feel sorry for the OP, it's the dog I'm sorry for.
     
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  11. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I've never seen @Burrowzig post anything but informative, helpful, valuable advice. There was nothing wrong with her/his reply. Humping is not dominance, and it needs to be said emphatically because one, that erroneous idea is so pervasive in the pet dog world, and two, viewing it as such often means it is dealt with in ways that are detrimental to the dog and unhelpful to the dog/human bond. Nothing wrong with rectifying inaccuracies with whatever emphasis needed.

    I also agree that a bitch is not totally healed from a spay in a week. That, and new rescues need time and space from other dogs to settle in to their new homes.
     
  12. danielled

    danielled PetForums VIP

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    I feel sorry for the dog too.
     
  13. Christy053

    Christy053 PetForums Newbie

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    It has been over a fortnight since her op, she had a two weekly check up on Thursday and he said everything was fine and can go about doggy life as normal and start gradually increasing her exercise. The dog was basically left for dead with pyometra, the dog warden took her to pound then to the vets for her operation if it wasn’t for the fosterer been able to take her in I dread to think what would happened. She is now in a very loving quiet home with two adult owners, I understand feeling sorry for her before she came in my care, but why now?
    I came here for advice because I don’t know everything about dogs and their behaviour but I’ve just been made out to be a terrible owner. I obviously understand a dog growling is a sign to the other dog to keep their distance or maybe pushed boundaries, but it was my dog that humped the younger dog and then growled back at the younger dog when it wasn’t happy with her behaviour, so surely that can’t be taken as a “poor dog just wants to be left alone” sign?
     
  14. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    No it still can.
    She's probably conflicted and partially think she wants to interact must mostly think she doesn't.

    Either way, it doesn't matter if she wants dogs around or not, what's best for her at this point is to give her a break from other dogs, let her have a chance to settle in to her new home, get to know you and you get to know her. Start working on your bond together, develop a shared language (through training) and THEN, once you have a better understanding of each other, introduce her to dogs with good dog skills who's owners have good control. At this point you two will hopefully know each other better and if she starts feeling uncomfortable she can communicate that and trust that you will intervene on her behalf as needed.
     
    Burrowzig, Anita1234 and Blitz like this.
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