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PUPPY'S FIRST WEEKS AT HOME

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Ellie W, Mar 27, 2021.


  1. Ellie W

    Ellie W PetForums Newbie

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    I'm picking up a dachshund puppy tomorrow and am beyond excited!

    Can anyone offer tips for training him to be comfortable when left for short periods in a crate unattended?

    Also, does anyone have any advice for how to keep puppies safe/happy when sleeping at night during their first week or so in their new home? Particularly in terms of...
    Which room should they sleep in?
    Should they be in a puppy pen or can they roam freely around the room?
    How many times should they be taken outside to go to the toilet during the night?
    For how long should they be left if whining before going to comfort/reassure them?
    For how long do 8-10 week old puppies tend to sleep/nap during the day?
     
  2. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel Banned

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    Check out the puppy support thread in the pinned posts at the top of the dog chat page - all the topics you mention have been covered many times.

    You can also use the search function and that will turn up posts from the training and behaviour pages which will have answers to most of your points too.

    A good book to start you off is 'Easy peazy puppy squeezy' you can buy that easily online.


    Good luck with your pup:)
     
  3. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    I’ve always had my pups free but lots of people use crates successfully I just can’t advise. Either way the first week keep them close to you either the crate in the room your sleeping in or some sleep downstairs with pup to settle them in. They need to know that crate is a safe space so don’t leave to cry. Pups do sleep a fair bit but normally have nighttime zoomies.
     
  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    This guide is excellent. It was written by Emma Judson and shared with her permission.

    https://1drv.ms/w/s!AnuxfGlWS_WrlnfTYtre6bwmpgqW

    Have his bed in your room, or you sleep in his room. It doesn't have to be forever, once he is sleeping through the night you can start to move his bed, in stages, towards the room you want him to use.

    They shouldn't be left to cry at all.

    At this stage, he is an infant who has just been separated from mum and littermates and meeting his emotional needs is just as important as meeting his physical needs. When he is crying, it is because he is alone in the dark and anxious. By you being there for him, you won't make him clingy, you will help him develop his confidence by protecting him from the scary night time and he will grow in confidence as he learns there is nothing to fear. You are not ”rewarding his crying,” you are meeting a fundamental need of an infant.

    Hopefully you wouldn't leave a child who was afraid of the dark to cry themselves to sleep, alone. Your puppy is the same. The dogs that stop crying don't do so because they suddenly realise everything is ok, they do it because they have given up hope. It is an extreme example but in trauma victims, it's the silent ones who are most damaged.

    This article explains the science behind it.

    http://www.simplybehaviour.com/letting-dog-cry-cause-permanent-damage/

    It is a good idea to start helping him develop independence soon though, and Emma Judson's Flitting Game, described about ⅔ of the way down this link is a good way to start.

    https://www.thecanineconsultants.co.uk/post/separation-anxiety-fact-vs-fiction


    Also, if he is in your room, you will be more likely to hear him moving which might indicate he needs taken out to toilet.
     
  5. Mum2Ozzy

    Mum2Ozzy PetForums Member

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    My partner slept with our puppy downstairs on the sofa for the first week. He goes to bed really late so he used to let puppyout just before heading upstairs well past midnight and I was up at 6 am. During the first week we worked on building positive associations with his crate, giving him treats there etc. If he was unhappy staying alone at night we'd take him upstairs as suggested above but we were really lucky. He now takes himself to bed in his crate and he responds to "bed" when I have to leave him alone (for school run for example) and doesn't protest when I lock the crate. But we never close him there during the day or as a punishment, he has his toys there and knows this is where he gets his treats and chews so when he sees me carrying his Kong he runs to his crate.
     
  6. LotsaDots

    LotsaDots PetForums Senior

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    Ours slept in a crate in our room covered with a blanket from night 1, he was a little bit unsettled at first but talking to him helped so he knew we hadn't abandoned him. I took him out once in the night for the toilet the first week but after that he slept through. He is 8 months now and we haven't moved him, we did try him out of the crate but he decided he wanted to play all night instead of sleep! He loves his crate and dives in there at bedtime for his biscuit and we don't hear a peep out of him for around 7-8 hours. They are all different though, our other dog never really liked her crate so ended up sleeping in her own bed in our room from about 6 months she's 5 now and chooses either our bed, her bed in our room or sometimes she goes in to the spare room on her own.
     
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