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Puppy toilet training HELP

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Nat1691, Oct 4, 2018.


  1. Nat1691

    Nat1691 PetForums Newbie

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    I’ve recently homed 2 baby chihuahua puppies! These little brothers are just so adorable!
    When first bringing them home, they obviously had a few accidents around my home until they figured out where puppy pads were placed.

    I would say 90% of the time these boys are going either on the puppy pad or outside They have just turned 12 weeks this week so think they are doing pretty well!

    My struggle is the pups are now able to go outside in the garden, and for walks in public areas following injections, but it seems that they are too pre-occupied with eating leaves and sniffing out new smells they forget to go toilet,then come into the house after 20-30 mins of play and head straight for a puppy pad or their pen (where a puppy pad is placed - also if no pad is in their pen - they will just pee on the floor!!)

    I would like to add here, I am fully aware that puppy pee contains enzymes which pups will follow back and re toilet here if they can smell previous pee! So I am very on top with cleaning, using two mop buckets and 2 mops, both containing disinfectants and products to remove smell/enzyme.

    Now here is my real issue,one of my pups is proving quite stubborn... and keeps peeing on pillows/ blankets that I have on my sofa!!!!!!! Which is driving me crazy!! He also has attempted to poop on the sofa blankets too and has succeeded on more than 1 occasion!! As soon as pee touches the blanket/pillows they are straight on a boil wash with bio washing products! (As for the poop blankets - they were straight in the bin!!!!) his main issue is peeing on the sofa rather than poop! It’s almost as he is too busy playing or can’t be arsed to get down and go to pad/outside!!
    I am always supervising when on the sofa but he always manages to squat down and release a little pee before I can grab him and place him on his pad (by this point he doesn’t want to pee!!!)
    Both pups are let outside 6am - until around 8:15am then have 30mins between 1pm-1.30pm then have the full evenings to play outside and go toilet, I’m honestly finding it quite difficult with 1 of my little pups as I don’t know why he keeps going for my sofa and pillows!!

    I have also read chihuahua are notoriously hard to potty train! If anyone has any tips I would be extremely grateful!!
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    This is one of the penalties of using puppy pads. You have inadvertently started them believing that soft surfaces indoors are the place to toilet. Puppy pads give mixed messages about whether indoor toilets are allowed or not and are terribly confusing for training.

    I wrote the following piece about one puppy, excuse me for not retyping it for plurals. You will however have to keep a close eye on both so more than double trouble and do please do some research on littermate syndrome.


    Toilet training happens when two things come together - the ABILITY to hold the toilet, along with the DESIRE to hold it in order to earn the reward for doing so.

    Ideally you want him to not be in a position where he needs to toilet before you have him outdoors, so that every toilet is outside - as far as possible, there will be accidents! So set him up to succeed by taking him out even more than he needs; for example every 45 minutes to an hour and always after sleeping, eating, playing. The time between a puppy realising they need to toilet, and being unable to hold that toilet, is zero. So your aim is to have him outside before he can't help himself. When he toilets outdoors make a huge fuss (never mind the neighbours, act like outdoor toileting is the best thing you have ever seen) and reward him with a high value treat. Do that that immediately, don't make him come to you for the treat so he is clear that it's for toileting and not for coming to you. The idea is that he eventually wants to earn the treat enough to hold the toilet until he is outside - once he is physically able to control his toileting obviously. If he has an accident inside don't react at all. If you get annoyed he may learn to fear your reaction and avoid you if he needs to toilet - the opposite of what you want. Just clean the area with an enzymatic cleaner to remove any trace of smell that might attract him back to the spot. As he is actually performing the toilet you can introduce words he can associate with it (like 'do weewee' and 'busy busy') that later when he is reliably trained you can use these to tell him when you want him to toilet.

    Indoors if you see him circling or scratching the floor, that can sometimes precede toileting so get him out fast.

    Overnight he is unlikely to be able to control his toilet as his little bladder and bowel are underdeveloped and not strong enough to hold all night so set your alarm to take him out at least once if not twice during the night.
     
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  3. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    It's a pity you used puppy pads instead of taking the puppies outside to the garden to toilet. It's absolutely fine to take puppies into a garden before all their innoculations.
    The problem with using pads is that they confuse the puppy into thinking they can toilet indoors on anything soft which you are already finding. Suddenly expecting them to toilet outside after being allowed to inside for so long is going to take time and patience to remedy.
    Go right back to basics and take the puppies out, on leads, after waking, after a meal, after playtime and about hourly. Wait patiently until they go giving plenty of praise and treats showing the puppies that it is the best thing in the world to toilet in the garden. You might try taking out a used puppy pad to try and encourage them to toilet outside.

    Have you shown any signs of displeasure if the puppies have toileted indoors? If so, then the puppies could be hiding from you in order to toilet because they are afraid of toileting in front of you, hence why you are having problems getting them to toilet outside.

    Also have you read about littermate syndrome? It can be quite a problem to have sibling dogs as they can bond with each other strongly and ignore the humans. I suggest you google this, but also read a couple of threads on this forum which have recently started with owners having two puppies. You will have a great deal of hard work ahead of you with two pups.
     
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  4. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Chihuahuas are not hard to toilet train. The problem with toy breeds is that you can easily miss an accident plus they are slower to mature however most breeders do not allow puppies to leave their home and most importantly their mother to gain social cues from till 12 weeks . So it's no different from .teaching a puppy coming home.

    Are you leaving the puppies outside alone to toilet?
     
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  5. Nat1691

    Nat1691 PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry new to this forum - hope I’ve replied correctly!! :-S Thanks to all who have replied with advice much appreciated!

    Yes done plenty of research over littermate syndrome, they are treated as equals and have separate and joint activities I honestly believe that it’s just an issue with one pup as the other is great with toileting. Thanks for the heads up though!

    I had to keep them in the house following bring home as our home was having unexpected outside work done and couldn’t trust work men with gates/ tools/ scaffolding/ ‘tiny chewable’ dangers all over my garden, although I am very aware due to this I have opened the ‘ok’ to toilet inside which is such a shame!

    Also due to the tiny breed - I feel that bladders are so small they constantly pee -so without a pad it would just be on the floor anyway if they don’t take themselves outside (although this has lessened as the weeks have gone on!) as like I said, they are too excited my garden smells and taste they forget to pee outside sometimes!

    I will definitely be putting used pads outside to encourage!

    Also no shouting at pups when accidents happen inside, I just clean up and get the pups to follow me outside to grassy area in which they use.And I am at mostly outside with them watching for signs of toileting, but as said - it’s sometimes hard to tell when they go due to their size and both boys are squatting! Also when evident they do toilet lots of praise given!
     
  6. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    Instead of puppy pads you could use a cat litter tray but put outside substrates in it, like gravel and turf, so that they still have somewhere to toilet indoors, but it is the same surface as they use outside. This way you can transition them to toileting only outside. When you take them outside do it on lead, wait for them to perform, gentle praise, then let them potter and explore for another minute or so to ensure they are totally empty, but also so they don't think that they will be brought straight in from toileting and stopping their outside time.
    For now get them outside as much as you possibly can - every half an hour if possible! They are only tiny, have tiny bladders and don't know they need to pee until literally the last second!
     
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  7. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    The tiny bladder is it's all in relation to size. You wouldn't expect them to have a bladder the size of a Labrador but then they wouldn't drink as much as a Labrador unless something was seriously wrong!

    Can I give you one tiny bit of advice that will prevent hopefully problems in the future. Try your hardest not to pick them up. It's so easy, they are so small that if you need to move them somewhere just to grab and go. The one thing dogs especially puppies learn quick is if you start picking them up to remove them they will soon learn to run away. In larger puppies it's not possible so owners have to train by calling their names etc.

    There are many posts here from you breeds that the fundamental problem is they have been constantly picked up and you get the running away, or snapping or worse. As touch is no longer a nice experience.
     
    Tyranade, Nat1691 and JoanneF like this.
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