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puppy teeth malocclusion.

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by leisurely, Mar 22, 2017.


  1. leisurely

    leisurely PetForums Junior

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    Took my lovely boy (9 week old Bedlington) into the (super expensive) vet to meet the vet nurse who is going to run the socialisation/obedience class.
    She gave him a once over then looked in his mouth, she told me she needed to check something out with the vet.
    On her return she said he had a malocclusion on both sides, his top teeth are digging into his 'lips' and have started to make holes.
    Recommendation is extraction ASAP. Cost £280.
    I am going to get a second opinion as Pets are us or at home. I suppose the question is, how long do I have before he gets an actual hole?
     
  2. Mirandashell

    Mirandashell Banned

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    It's impossible for us to say. Can you see any marks on his lips?
     
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  3. wee man

    wee man PetForums VIP

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    Good idea to go to another vets and get a second opinion! That seems a bit dramatic for such a young puppy!!
     
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  4. leisurely

    leisurely PetForums Junior

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    Thanks for the responses. He doesn't have holes in his lips, rather little dents.
    Thanks again
     
  5. rona

    rona Still missing my boys

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    These teeth will fall out soon anyway. I'd get a second opinion.

    Is he showing any signs of discomfort, excessive licking etc?
     
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  6. leisurely

    leisurely PetForums Junior

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    None at all. Obviously we've been playing with him, stroking him, loving him etc. Didn't even cross my mind to open his mouth to have a look. Pets at home here we come!
     
  7. wee man

    wee man PetForums VIP

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    A second opinion, is a good decision.
    Puppies start to change their teeth at 16 weeks, starting with the very small front teeth.
    Good luck.
     
  8. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Malocclusions are caused by a misalignment of the teeth, you can get different causes and types and treatment depends on what type. This may be of some help

    http://www.sacvds.com/forms/malocclusions-orthodontic-treatment.pdf
     
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  9. leisurely

    leisurely PetForums Junior

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    Thanks for that. He doesn't seem to have a misaligned jaw, just his teeth don't fit as they should. I'll know more tomorrow.
     
  10. Mirandashell

    Mirandashell Banned

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    Let us know how it goes.
     
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  11. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    Just spotted this, it will not be long before they fall out on there own and if they are causing him a problem I'd leave them, but a second oppion never hurts. it's there adult teeth are the ones to keep an eye on.
     
  12. leisurely

    leisurely PetForums Junior

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    Yep, vet agreed. Baby teeth are not as important as adult teeth. She also questioned the wisdom of subjecting such a small chap to to an unnecessary anaesthetic. Phew!
    Although she obviously can't say one way or another, the impression I got was it was probably a money making excercise.
    Saved myself £280. Result.
     
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  13. wee man

    wee man PetForums VIP

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    Fantastic news :)
    There are a lot of vets out there that just want to take our money!!
     
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  14. Mirandashell

    Mirandashell Banned

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    Nice one!
     
  15. Ceiling Kitty

    Ceiling Kitty Hides away from much through humour...

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    Sorry, late to this.

    Main issue is NOT the deciduous ('baby') teeth in these cases, but the permanent adult teeth that follow. Just like in humans, the eruption of the adult teeth is guided by the position of the deciduous teeth and if the deciduous teeth are malaligned, the permanent teeth could follow.

    Watch this very, VERY carefully. Did you get a second opinion in the end? If the teeth do start to impinge on the soft tissues of his mouth, it will be painful.

    ETA: sorry, I misread your post - you did receive an opinion from another vet. Fingers crossed all is well.
     
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  16. JANE RICHARDS

    JANE RICHARDS PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, I couldn't find anything specific to dog dentistry so apologies if I should have posted this elsewhere.

    Has anyone any experience of a 6 month old puppy having all the back teeth extracted?

    I'm obviously concerned as this is major surgery and wondering whether I should request a referral to a specialist dental vet?
    I don't care what it costs - I doubt her insurance will cover it as she must have been born like this - I just want her to have the best care.
    Her jaw doesn't open fully and her lower jaw is much shorter than the top - she can't pick up a tennis ball and anything smaller gets stuck as she can't drop it. I had to take the Kong off her as she gets it stuck. She's happy and eats well but now her adult teeth are developing her gums look sore at the back and the rear upper and lower teeth are touching.
    The vet said to wait until she was spayed and they would have a proper look then but I don't think she can wait potentially several months, I'm concerned about pain and infection setting in. She is registered with a relatively new local practice as I don't trust my previous vet following the death of my previous dog.
    Any advice appreciated...
     
  17. wee man

    wee man PetForums VIP

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    second opinion from an independent vet not connected to the practice that you use now!
     
  18. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    @JANE RICHARDS, could it be that the deciduous teeth are being pushed up by the adult ones coming through, and once the puppy teeth are out, the adult ones could be OK? Has she always been unable to fully open her mouth? Gums are often red and sore as the new teeth erupt.
    Many people spay/neuter at 6 months or thereabouts. It's not something I'd want to do though. I agree, get a second opinion.
     
  19. JANE RICHARDS

    JANE RICHARDS PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for your reply - I'm having trouble navigating around this site - (I'm a dinosaur)
    It wasn't a teeth problem after all - After several x rays it was plain to see that Audrey has a congenitally deformed skull so will never be able to open her mouth fully - however the vet said to "wait & see" - she was happy to refer to an orthopaedic specialist but as Audrey is happy and eating without trouble then I've decided not to pursue it. She has a grossly undershot jaw but I'm happy with my wonky dog. There was no underlying swelling or infection and nothing nasty that could be seen on an Xray so best left alone I think. Radical surgery for a non life threatening issue isn't something I can put her through. She's very nearly seven months now and has been spayed which wouldn't have been my ideal time but better to just put her through one anaesthetic I suppose. 48 hours later she is still a bit spaced out but she's eating and has been to the toilet so fingers crossed this will be the least trauma she has to go through in her life.
    Thanks for the support :)
     
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