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Puppy pulling on lead!

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Riosmumma, Jun 22, 2019.


  1. Riosmumma

    Riosmumma PetForums Newbie

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    Hi guys,
    My pup is 15weeks and loves charging around!
    We have started puppy classes she’s very bright and does every trick in the book! We do however have a problem with walking nicely on a lead. We have been advised to stop and wait until the lead goes loose, but this never happens! She’s desperate to run off with her big sisters.
    1- Will she just grow into walking nicely on the lead or are we going wrong?!
    2- She’s walked on an ezy harness, would it be better on a collar so we have more control? (With previous dogs we have had them on choke chains -many years ago- I know she’s in no way big enough for one of those!)

    I’ve never had a puppy before so I’m a novice!
    TIA
     
  2. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    Is she always walked with other dogs ? I would take her out alone and work on lead walking so she is not desperate to catch up.

    Never use choke collars use positive reinforcement. I have a harness for my pup it feels more sturdy when he pulls.
     
  3. Riosmumma

    Riosmumma PetForums Newbie

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    I have been taking her on her own as well, she’s not a food girl either so treats don’t do the trick, have tried taking a little toy as a reward but she’s more interested in everything else!
    I’ll try to walk them separately more though Thank you!
     
  4. tabelmabel

    tabelmabel PetForums VIP

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    It will happen, but you need bags of patience! What breed is your puppy? Some are definitely worse than others when it comes to pulling and it can take many months of consistant training to get a dog that walks well.

    When training heelwork, dont try to go anywhere. Start in a hallway or large room in your house, progress to your garden/yard and then just a short stretch on your street. When your pup pulls and you stop, it could be 10 or 15 minutes before you get going again. Then you get 2 steps and are stopped again. So it really isnt suitable to be going anywhere. But it does tend to get quicker as your pup catches on. I ended up with a yo yo dog with this method that ran ahead and back to my side constantly.

    Another method is to turn and walk back the way when your pup goes ahead.

    These methods worked better for me when combined with a clicker to mark the correct position. You need to decide if you want 'heel' to mean close by your side or just loose lead and stick to it. Be sure only to say 'heel' when your dog is at heel. It is all too easy to start pulling the dog back to heel and giving the command then, whilst bringing the dog back.

    Also be sure to teach the word first in a stationary position so your pup knows what it means.

    I like to teach heel on a flat collar and lead, but that's just a personal preference. I also used a gentle leader on both mine if i wasnt training and needed to actually get somewhere. You cant start teaching heel and then let your pup pull when in a hurry so think about how you will manage that.

    Getting your pup to heel in the house and garden off lead is also good to try. Many pups find this easier than on lead.

    It is not an easy or quick thing to teach though so dont expect quick results!
     
  5. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    Does she not eat? At 15 weeks she should be on three or four meals a day I would have thought. With all my puppies a proportion of their food allowance is fed by me, by hand as part of the training. Not given free in a bowl. Whatever food you are using on a daily basis can be adapted to training so I would look into that a little more closely.

    Tabelmabel has give good advice above re lead walk training - it's a process. And you need to walk her on her own. At 15 weeks I have to say i don't do much formal lead walking with my pups it's all garden practice and getting their focus through play (engagement) then letting them have a run in the field. Once I feel they are mature enough i start a more formal approach.

    Oh and I use a front lead harness for training.

    J
     
    O2.0 likes this.
  6. Tracey3cats

    Tracey3cats PetForums Junior

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    Personally I would start as you mean to go on and work on walking calmly.
    My collie is 17 months old and is a dreadful puller, especially on the outward bound journey. It is taking a lot of patience to try and correct this.
    I have been advised to stop walking, give a check of the lead and bring her back to my side as soon as she starts to pull and wait for her to relax the tension then start off again and repeat. Nearly 3 weeks in and there is a very slight improvement but only if we are alone. If we walk with anyone else she still tries to pull ahead!
    It's going to be a long process!!
     
  7. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    I wouldn't advise checking the lead, especially if the puppy is wearing a collar. You can cause long-term damage that way.
    And yes, please no choke chains, you will definitely cause physical damage with those.

    In addition to the already good advice, especially about dividing up meals and using training time as feeding time, I would teach your pup what to do when she hits the end of the leash. This video is about shy ore reactive dogs, but the principle works with all dogs. They need to see hitting the end of the leash as a cue to return to you. There are several ways you can teach this depending on what motivates your dog.

     
    Boxer123 likes this.
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