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Puppy eatting habits - pulling my hair out

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Colo, Apr 7, 2011.


  1. Colo

    Colo PetForums Junior

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    Hi,

    My 15 week old Tibetan Terrier is eatting properly.

    She just doesnt seem interested in the food I give her. I have had for almost 4 weeks and I really have to coax her into eatting.

    I started off with the routine the breeder started but then she refused to eat it, such as puppy butchers, cooked mince and kibble.
    She suddenly decided she didnt like it and refused to eat it.

    I then tried James Wellbeloved and she ate this, but then stopped.

    Today all she would eat was a can of tuna. But she acts liek she is starveing and went crazy for my spagetti dinner and then yapped madly for a bit of my bacon sandwich. Bad me then gave her a bit of bacon which she gobbled up.

    She continually sniffs around the floor looking for food. Yet won't eat any of her own food.

    I feel really frustrated and never had this issue before with my other dogs.

    She is a bundle of energy, she goes crazy running around like a mad thing.


    I'm not sure what to do. I was going to take her to the vet but I don't think she is ill, as she is eatting but seems overly fussy.

    Any advice?
     
  2. henry

    henry PetForums VIP

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    I would try some Naturediet Puppy, Natures Harvest Puppy or Natures Menu Puppy. Also Wainwrights Puppy trays by Pets at Home. These are complete, moist foods in trays/pouches, but are around 70% meat, rice and vegetables. No additives or preservatives, etc. You can add them to the kibble if you adjust the kibble down or feed them alone.

    Personally I'd try this - you can buy the foods singly at PAH for around 80p-£1 each. Not known many dogs to refuse these foods and many people on here have had success with them. Good luck! Claire
     
  3. Colo

    Colo PetForums Junior

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    Hi Henry,

    I did try these, I make sure its all the good stuff, but then she goes off it.

    I'm worried I have tried so many now that she thinks she is in a restaurant and can have new things. So by trying to get her to eat something by choosing new food I am making things worse.
     
  4. henry

    henry PetForums VIP

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    Hi - well, if she's going to be that fussy there's probably only one thing for it, I'm afraid. I would pick one of the really good quality foods such as the ND, etc and just put it down and take it up after 15 minutes until the next meal. No treats of any kind in between meals. She will eat it when she's hungry - you've tried different foods so you've given her the chance to pick one.... there's not much more you can do.

    Have to say, this is a common thing with pups/adolescents... Henry went through a stage around 6-8 months like this, he came through it in the end. Have you tried warming the food slightly - it smells better for them and sometimes works?

    Claire
     
  5. dvnbiker

    dvnbiker PetForums Senior

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    second what Claire has said above about the only leaving it down for an amount of time. I went through exactly the same but my pup would starve herself over eating any kibble. We now feed raw and she never leaves a meal.
     
  6. Colo

    Colo PetForums Junior

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    Thanks. I will try that, it's really frustrating. Actually warming it up did help but then even that stopped worked. I thought perhaps its because she is teething.

    It's annoying wasteing so much food. But I will try the 15 mins idea.

    I could try raw. I did look into it but then saw it was a little controversial
     
  7. Lyceum

    Lyceum PetForums VIP

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    Agree totally with the 15 trick. If tyou don't nip this in the bud you will end up constantly fussing over your dogs food, and wasting ££££ on uneaten dog food.

    You need to teach her that if she doesn't wat what you put down, she goes without.
     
  8. Marley boy

    Marley boy PetForums VIP

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    First of all if she is happy and full of energy then she is obviously getting enouth food so try not to worry. Never give in to her pleas for food off your plate as this can be a hard habbit to break. I would reccomend weinwrights trays for fussy eaters :D
     
  9. Colo

    Colo PetForums Junior

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    Thanks, so we serve it up, (breakfast) leave it for 15 minutes and then take it away.

    We then replace with the next meal, (lunchtime) and leave for 15 mins and take away.

    What if she doesnt eat all day? Do I just let her go hungry? I am weak but perpared to be harsh if in the longrun it helps :D
     
  10. Colo

    Colo PetForums Junior

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    Yes tried those, she wouldnt eat it. She is like mega fussy. She did eat Naturediet until that was boring.

    In my desperation I think I tried too many foods and it has made the matter worse. She has become like a displeased Mary Antoinette and I'm her cook.

    I think I'm going to have to to be tough on her.
     
  11. ian1969uk

    ian1969uk PetForums Member

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    She will eat it eventually, and long before it's done her any harm.

    By fussing like this, and giving in, all you are doing is reinforcing her behaviour as she thinks she can pick and choose what to eat and you will respond accordingly.
     
  12. Colo

    Colo PetForums Junior

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    Yes I have been overly indulgent to her behaviour. I was just worried because I keep getting told how important it is that as a puppy she eats properly.
     
  13. Marley boy

    Marley boy PetForums VIP

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    hhhhhm sounds like your just going to have to be cruel to be kind :) i don't think a dog will starve it's self if there is food around. hope you have a break though soon :)
     
  14. ian1969uk

    ian1969uk PetForums Member

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    Don't criticise yourself, we've all been there :)

    I can second a recommendation for Wainwright's, a very good food imo.
     
  15. Lyceum

    Lyceum PetForums VIP

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    Pretty much yes.

    In this case you need to be cruel to be kind. Put the food down for 15 mins, if it's not eaten take it up, and do the same next meal time. Don't give anything in between, no treats, nothing.

    It is important for her to be having a good diet, which means regular meals. So it's important to nip this in the bud.

    Novak did this at about 6 months, and I pandered to him till the vet suggested the 15 minute trick, it was hard and he missed three meals but has never done it since.
     
  16. Colo

    Colo PetForums Junior

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    Thanks. No treats and we took the food away after 15 mins. She is in a real strop as we ate our dinner and she wanted some. So shes off sulking.

    Thanks for the advice. It feels like a battle of wills that she shouldnt be able to win.
     
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