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Puppy eating grass and mud

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Chris Lisi, Jul 28, 2020.


  1. Chris Lisi

    Chris Lisi PetForums Newbie

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    Hello!

    I have a 4 month old cocker spaniel puppy called Charlie, ever since we first got him he has had a thing for eating grass and mud, I hoped he would start to grow out of it as he gets older but 2 months later and it’s no better, if anything it’s worse!
    I let him out into the garden to go to the toilet regularly to keep the house training going consistently but more often than not he grabs a clump of grass pulls it out by the roots and starts to eat it!
    I’m not precious about the lawn, I can fix that anytime, I’m more concerned about him, if it could be harmful and if he is likely to grow out of it? I mentioned it to the vet when he had his last vaccinations and she basically dismissed it as nothing to worry about. The trainer at puppy training said I should try to distract him with a toy, that works until he either gets the toy or I stop squeaking it and then he’s straight back to the grass, so it’s really not sustainable.
    At the moment when I let him out and he doesn’t go to the toilet and starts eating grass I bring him back in hoping that will end his fun and he’ll cotton on to eating grass = going inside but so far he hasn’t got it! :Banghead
    Is it something I should be worried about or should I let him get on with it? Has anyone else had this with their puppy and at what age did it stop? (If at all!)

    Thank you :)
     
    RachG likes this.
  2. MontyMaude

    MontyMaude PetForums VIP

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    My boy used to eat anything and everything as a puppy, thankfully he grew out of it eventually sort of rabbit droppings are still irresistible, but I started to teach a leave it and drop command indoors on toys and then always used to take him out on lead in the garden for wees and poops, he only got left off after doing his business to have a little play/run round, and once he got to grips with the leave it, I would ask him to leave it or drop if he had grabbed something, also a little treat used to work wonders to get him to refocus me on and leave whatever he was trying to eat, good luck, it normally just a phase but once they drop one annoying phase they tend to pick up another :D
     
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  3. RachG

    RachG PetForums Newbie

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  4. RachG

    RachG PetForums Newbie

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    Hi, I got a puppy rescue last month and he does the same. Except he likes twigs also. At the moment he is into pinching our shoes and hiding under the sofa to try to chew them. Unfortunately I'm not as small as him, ha! so I'm on all fours with the squeaky toys to entice him out!
     
  5. Chris Lisi

    Chris Lisi PetForums Newbie

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    I think like @MontyMaude suggested I might work on leave it / drop it commands, then hopefully when he goes for grass I can get him to stop and with enough consistency he should understand it’s not worth even trying!
     
    Kakite likes this.
  6. sarahjim

    sarahjim Banned

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    It's totally normal and yes its true puppies sometimes try to explore the world with their mouths. You need to try to teach your puppy to consult with you before eating anything on the ground by playing a few games that will help him practice impulse control. There is a game I found on the internet some time ago. They call this game 'it's your choice'. You have to follow few simple steps: 1. Put treats in your hand and hold your hand in a fist. 2. Let your dog sniff, nibble or paw at your hand. 3. Don't open your fist until your dog sits back to wait. 4. Close your hand when he dives toward the treats. When he sits back again and waits a second or two, place one treat on the ground for him to gobble up. 5. Gradually increase the time between opening your hand and delivering the treat to build his impulse control. Hope it helps. Good luck! https://esacare.com/qualifying-for-an-esa-letter-guide/
     
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