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Puppy Crying in his Crate HELP

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Mikeyboy, Apr 4, 2020.


  1. Mikeyboy

    Mikeyboy PetForums Newbie

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    Hi everyone, this is my first post!

    About 3 weeks ago I picked up a ten week old bedlington whippet puppy: Sid. I thought it was perfect timing with a scheduled 2 week break from work but obviously that has turned into indefinite lock down which adds some context.

    Sid's my first puppy but I think I'm doing an OK job. He sits, comes and stays well and even though he's quite bity and hyper sometimes, he's mostly very chilled out! He even asks to go to the toilet in the garden (with only the occasional accident).

    I'm having a big problem with separation anxiety (I think) but not all the time. He's pretty OK being left alone for short periods when I'm out as much as I can be in lockdown and he goes into his crate by himself at night and settles. He was in a crate in my room for the first two weeks but now he's in the living room. We g to bed at 11 after he's well fed and exercised with a few hours wind down. He'll drift off and wake up at 1:30 and 4ish to go to the toilet. After being put back in his crate after his last toilet break at 4 he will scream and bark and whine so loudly and there is nearly nothing I can do to settle him. I've tried everything, giving him treats when he's quiet, training him to be left in the crate in the day, Kong toy, meals in the crate, giving him a whole room to sleep in at night, ignoring his crying etc. But it's nearly impossible to leave him to cry as he keeps me, everyone else in the house and the neighbours up!

    The only thing that works is taking him into bed with me, a habit I'm desperately trying to put a stop to. But for my own sanity and that of the neighbours I need to do it. It's also for his own safety as he will do everything he can to escape his crate.

    When I try to train him in the crate in the day he also cries and whines when I leave but I don't understand because he seems to really like his crate and takes his toys there etc.

    I'm trying my best to give him all the exercise I can without his jabs but this problem has to stop and I don't know whether to give up on putting him in his crate because he finds it so stressful and try something else or persist in agony and no sleep! I'm worried I might be being too soft on him but I read so much conflicting advice online that I'm a bit lost.

    Please help if you can!

    Thanks

    Mike
     
    #1 Mikeyboy, Apr 4, 2020
    Last edited: Apr 4, 2020
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    If he is screaming and whining, and you leave him to do it, you risk making the crate a place he fears and hates. It won't be the happy place you need it to be. And if he is trying to escape the crate, he is pretty distressed.

    So, I'd take him to your room - not necessarily in your bed if you prefer not to. Can you have his bed either at the side of yours or better still on a box or something so it is level with your bed, so you can reassure him?

    That isn't being soft, it's just comforting an anxious baby.
     
    Torin. and Lurcherlad like this.
  3. Mikeyboy

    Mikeyboy PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks JoanneF

    I've been thinking about doing that but I don't know if it'll set a precedent?

    I'm going to try it tonight though!

    Mike
     
  4. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    It doesn't have to be forever. Once he is settling well, you can move his bed from right beside you to the floor for a few nights, then by your bedroom door for a few, then outside your room for a few and so on. Take it slowly though, if he cries you are going too fast and then you will have to go back a step for a few more nights.
     
  5. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    I think the crate is now not the safe, happy place it should be so I’d dump it tbh.

    Have him back in your room at night, preferably on the floor in his own bed next to yours so you can touch him and use your voice to reassure him.

    Work on leaving him with a Kong for a few seconds at first, returning before he stresses and build from there.

    Create a safe room for when you have to leave him to go to the shops etc.

    When is his last meal? It might be he’s hungry which wakes him then he needs comfort to resettle.
     
    Torin. likes this.
  6. Mikeyboy

    Mikeyboy PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for the replies!

    I'll try the slowly slowly approach. He was settling quite well when in the crate in my room so might revert back to that kind of setup (less the crate).

    He was eating at 7 but I thought he might be crying cause he's hungry too so I moved it back to about 8 ish.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  7. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    I'd give him a few pieces of food or a small biscuit right before bedtime.
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  8. Kakite

    Kakite PetForums VIP

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    Also wouldn’t worry too much about “setting a precedent”. our pup slept with us in bed for a good two weeks and then happily slept in the crate in our bedroom and now she prefers to sleep in her crate (with the door open) .
     
    Lurcherlad likes this.
  9. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    The less anxiety they suffer in the early days the sooner they will settle into their new life and will progress to becoming a confident, independent pup going forward ime.
     
    Kakite, Torin. and JoanneF like this.
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