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Puppy behaviour.

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Effy123, Feb 6, 2020.


  1. Effy123

    Effy123 PetForums Newbie

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    Hello, just want some advice as everything I’ve been reading on the internet is not helping me.

    I have a 6month old puppy and a 2year old dog both springers very active dogs,
    The puppy is good at telling me when she wants letting out to the toilet which she always gets let out, but the minute it comes to nights or being out the house or upstairs for a short amount of time she will wee in the house, she will wee on fabric like her bed or on carpet if she can or if she can’t she will wee on the kitchen floor. I will always let her out before bed, going upstairs, going out but she will wee no matter what. She is good at going outside when I’m about and asking to go out, just don’t know what to do...

    Also when ever she is in the kitchen she will try to escape into the rest of the house when I am in the house or not she will try to get thorough to the rest of the house. Also she will cry and so will my other dog which the older dog has only started doing this recently. Read that this is to do with boredom which she is getting a walk each morning and evening and then she has my other dog to play with plus lots of toys and chews.
     
  2. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Could be separation anxiety rather than boredom.
     
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  3. Whiteshadow

    Whiteshadow PetForums Senior

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    Sounds like they know you are in the house and want to be with you. Thats very natural .Are they kept separated in the kitchen?
     
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  4. Effy123

    Effy123 PetForums Newbie

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    They are both in the kitchen together so they can play, they come into the living room sometimes in the evenings when I am there but are kept in the kitchen and conservatory most the time.
     
  5. Whiteshadow

    Whiteshadow PetForums Senior

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    Dogs are different but most dogs I know value their owners company more than other dogs company. We give then security,company ,schedule,training food and treats.
    I'm at home now with my girlie and her best doggie friend they are curled together on the sofa but won't take their eyes off me and if I go to another room they will follow me eventually and none of them is an anxious dog.
    If I were you I would start allowing them more time with you when you are home . That doesn't mean you have to give them attention 24/7 they just want to be with you.
    The assumption that if you put two dogs together with toys they will entertain themselves is simply wrong for most dogs I'm afraid.
     
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  6. Ian246

    Ian246 PetForums Senior

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    I think Spaniels can be particularly close to their owners. My Sprocker is a rescue (so, there’s all that), but he generally prefers to be with me and I’ve dad the same of Springers in general.
    You say they can play with each other, but do they? As Whiteshadow says, dogs don’t really entertain each other that much. I’d say my two play together for about thirty seconds per day on average...if they play at all.
    Ref the weeing, I get the impression that it’s when she’s not with you that she wees. That may be the answer: she may be getting so stressed and it’s nervous weeing.
     
    Lurcherlad and kimthecat like this.
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