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Puppy barking

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by thecaddy76, Jun 28, 2021.


  1. thecaddy76

    thecaddy76 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi all,

    have a puppy of 10 weeks old and am struggling with barking / howling through the night. I have purchased an anti bark device (sonar) but am questioning internally the ethics of this and my dogs sanity. Reviews are all good and my vet is not adverse to the idea but I keep thinking ‘Chinese water torture’

    any thoughts / advice

    ps I have not activated it yet
     
  2. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    Bin the collar.

    At 10 weeks this is just a baby, are you with the pup when they’re barking or are they on their own? It can take many weeks before a baby pup is confident enough to sleep alone (some never really do). You need to sleep in the same place as the pup, make them feel safe, assure them, even if that means sleeping on the sofa.
     
  3. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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  4. tyg'smum

    tyg'smum PetForums Senior

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    If he's only ten weeks old, he's feeling lonely and insecure at night - he could well be missing his Mum. Where is he sleeping? He'll settle much better in your bedroom, either in a bed or a crate, where you can reach out and talk to him when he gets distressed.

    (I ignored this advice when I adopted my girl - as a result we ended up spending 12 weeks sleeping on the floor with her! Believe me, you don't want to go there...)

    Edited to add: bin the collar. Leaving ethical considerations aside, it'll only add to his distress.
     
  5. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    Please don't use the collar. Your puppy is howling because he is afraid - apart from the fact that fear is an emotion, not a behaviour (he isn't choosing to feel afraid, he can't help it) aversive tools like these may suppress the behaviour but absolutely don't fix the problem. You would have a puppy that is still afraid of being alone at night and also afraid to tell you.

    I'm guessing you have been told to leave him to 'cry it out'. That is quite old fashioned advice that we now know does a lot of harm. And in the wild, baby animals would not be separated from their mother for much, much longer.

    So, for a few weeks, have his bed in your room, or you sleep in his room. It doesn't have to be forever, once he is sleeping through the night you can start to move his bed, in stages, towards the room you want him to use.

    Right now, he is an infant who has just been separated from mum and littermates and meeting his emotional needs is just as important as meeting his physical needs. When he is crying, it is because he is alone in the dark and anxious. By you being there for him, you won't make him clingy, you will help him develop his confidence by protecting him from the scary night time and he will grow in confidence as he learns there is nothing to fear. You are not ”rewarding his crying,” you are meeting a fundamental need of an infant.

    Hopefully you wouldn't leave a child who was afraid of the dark to cry themselves to sleep, alone. Your puppy is the same. The dogs that stop crying don't do so because they suddenly realise everything is ok, they do it because they have given up hope. It is an extreme example but in trauma victims, it's the silent ones who are most damaged.

    This article explains the science behind it.

    http://www.simplybehaviour.com/letting-dog-cry-cause-permanent-damage/

    It is a good idea to start helping him develop independence soon though, and Emma Judson's Flitting Game, described about ⅔ of the way down this link is a good way to start.

    https://www.thecanineconsultants.co.uk/post/separation-anxiety-fact-vs-fiction
     
    DanWalkersmum, O2.0, Twiggy and 2 others like this.
  6. thecaddy76

    thecaddy76 PetForums Newbie

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    We have not left him alone at night yet but want to get back to normalcy. Life solution is not one of us sleeping downstairs with the dog.

    T’he device I have is not a collar but a reactive speaker, pretty sure Alexa has the same as an app.

    I do think it is safe but I am a human and do love my pup and don’t want to hurt him in anyway either physically or mentally
     
  7. Pricivius

    Pricivius PetForums Member

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    So your pup is barking and howling when you are lying next to him? You can reach out and touch him, but he still howls? It may help if we understand your current set up..
     
    JoanneF likes this.
  8. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    If the pup is alone and you’re using a remote device to try and soothe him, but he’s still unsettled then it’s obvious he needs company. Tbh I think such a device in a dark empty room would actually scare him.

    I would have him sleep with me at first … he needs company, cuddles, warmth and reassurance.

    Progress then to his own bed next to you and gradually move him to where you need him to be.

    Or sleep downstairs next to his bed.
     
    #8 Lurcherlad, Jun 29, 2021
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2021
  9. bunnygeek

    bunnygeek PetForums VIP

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    There’s no going “back to normalcy”, you have a puppy now, there is a new normal ;)

    The dog needs comfort and assurance, read the links above.

    I agree it would be helpful to know what the situation is exactly when the pup is barking and howling. Are they getting time to sleep? Baby pups need a lot of sleep but, like human toddlers, can get over tired and refuse to take naps.
     
  10. Mum2Ozzy

    Mum2Ozzy PetForums Member

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    It won't be forever. It took about 2 weeks for us and Ozzy slept soundly ever since. He doesn't wake us up in the morning either, I'm usually the one waking him up and he goes straight back to sleep once kids leave for school/nursery x
     
  11. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    His only a baby, his been taken away from his Mom and Sibling for cause his going to cry wouldn't you.

    I slept on the sofa with Dillon in his crate next to me for over three weeks until he was dry though the nigh a settled. I just gently spoke to him when he cried but nothing else, and it was easier for taking him out for toilet breaks when needed.

    Has he got some some soft cuddly toys to snuggle into at night.
     
  12. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    Presumably you’ve had this puppy for 2weeks, if he’s now 10 weeks?

    So you’ve put in 2 weeks effort so far. Was that as much as you expected before ‘normalcy’ returned?

    Sleeping with the pup, to keep him company, while he gets used to being away from the companionship, warmth and security that were his mum and litter mates, isn’t a lot to ask if you’re actually committed to doing the best you can for him.

    It won’t be for that long; maybe weeks but as you’re going to have this puppy for maybe up to 15 years then it’s surely worthwhile to start growing a confident, well balanced dog?

    There will be further issues to overcome in the future, and in no case is the best solution buying a gadget online.
     
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  13. GB70

    GB70 PetForums Member

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    One way or another you've got to pay the piper :(

    Either make the bigger sacrifice now, let him sleep in your room and be prepared to get up and comfort him when he barks/cry's.

    Or try to return to normality, let him sleep on his own and cry/bark, in which case it will likely go on for a lot lot longer and possibly lead to issues that are harder to fix.

    I took the first route and after a couple of months she decided to sleep downstairs by herself (where she was spending all her time anyway).

    Good luck :)
     
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