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Puppy agressiveness

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Winniethepoodle, Sep 16, 2020 at 2:19 PM.


  1. Winniethepoodle

    Winniethepoodle PetForums Newbie

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    My 91/2 week puppy is displaying behaviour I just don't know how to deal with. She often gets overtired and I am working hard to avoid this situation by playing calmly and we play training games which she likes and she does take lots of regular naps throughout the day. I let her sleep so she is well rested. But sometimes she gets wound up if I am trying to stop her doing something she wants to do. For instance today she was trying to get into an area of the garden that is not suitable for her and no matter how much you try to block her access she will try and try to get in. It becomes almost a battle of wills and then she becomes overtired trying. I try to distract her away but she doesnt want to know and ignores all my attempts. So I pick her up and take her elsewhere and she goes back to try again. When I try to get her away again she becomes snarly and barks and jumps up to bite me. I try ignoring her and turn my back on her to walk away and she just charges at my legs biting my calves. So ignoring her and avoiding eye contact just results in her continuing to behave the way I am trying to avoid. What do you do when it backfires like this?
     
  2. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Take her out into the garden on the lead or a long line. She's pushing her luck as puppies do and they can be very determined little lovelies.
     
  3. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    Rather then thinking your puppy is aggressive, think of a 2 year old throwing a temper tantrum.
    If you have an area that you don’t want her going into is it worth fencing it off so she physically can’t get there without you having to try and stop her. She’s too young to understand the reason for you stopping her, all she sees is you getting in the way of where she wants to explore, hence the tantrum. Two year old toddlers are just as likely to bite and scratch too but it doesn’t signal aggression, just a deep frustration.
     
  4. Winniethepoodle

    Winniethepoodle PetForums Newbie

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    I have tried the lead but she hates it and fights it which then worries me as I fear this is putting her in the overstimulation/overtiredness range again.
     
  5. Winniethepoodle

    Winniethepoodle PetForums Newbie

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    Yes its exactly like a temper tantrum. She just tries to dig the lawn around it looking for another way in. Alot of the time she ignores it but when she decides its time to go look then she goes bananas when I try to stop her. She actually behaves this way whenever I try to stop her doing anything she doesn't want to stop doing so its not just the garden thing. This is why its frustrating as she has this temper tantrum and if I ignore her she just goes for me. The rest of the time she is a sweet little angel. I don't want her thinking she can bully me.
     
  6. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Can you explain exactly what you do when you're trying to stop her doing something undesirable because it rather sounds as if you are getting into a big argument with her?
     
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  7. Winniethepoodle

    Winniethepoodle PetForums Newbie

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    I do feel exactly like I am getting into an argument with her. I try to ignore her and turn my back on her and avoid eye contact or walk away, this is when she charges at the back of my legs and bites my calves or ankles almost like she is saying 'don't you dare ignore me and walk away!'
     
  8. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    So use a line that trails on the ground, When you need to, step on the end then pick it up and reel her in, calling her as you do. Then reward with a treat. That can soon become a much more mutually rewarding game for both of you.
     
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  9. Twiggy

    Twiggy PetForums VIP

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    Sadly I have a fractured wrist so typing with one finger is very difficult at the moment.
    It is very rare for a young puppy to be aggressive in the true sense of the word but she has spent several weeks honing her play biting and squabbling skills with her litter siblings. The only way for her to express herself and get your attention is barking, whining or with her teeth until she is taught otherwise. As has been suggested use a light line (obviously with no handle that she can catch her feet in). When she is hell bent on trying to get where she shouldn't be use a handful of tasty treats (small cubes of cheese or fresh chicken) and say something like "what's this" in an excited voice and when she looks scatter a few under her nose. You can practice that in the house so that "what's this" and the treats become by far the better option. She clearly doesn't like you grabbing her and will not understand what "no" means. Praise the good behaviour and ignore the bad. Hope this helps.
     
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  10. Winniethepoodle

    Winniethepoodle PetForums Newbie

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    Hope your wrist recovers soon, thanks for replying. We have noticed that she does listen to my husband a lot more than she listens to me, she understands 'no' from him. She obviously sees him as the leader of the pack and will immediately stop doing whatever she is doing. I can say and do exactly the same thing in the same tone but it doesn't have any effect. My previous dog also saw my husband as the leader of the pack and did everything she was told but she would also listen to me too. It's like Winnie is trying to claim second place in the pack over me. If my husband is nearby she stops what she is doing but as soon as he goes she starts off again with me. When he comes back she stops again. I can't be attached to him all day as much as I'm sure he would love me to be (haha!).
     
  11. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    Dogs don’t think in these terms, they know humans are not dogs and don’t treat us in this way. The pack ideas in dogs have been discounted as dogs don’t form packs like wolves do. The wolf pack is formed in the way it is as the wolves are related to one another, the scientist who wrote about the pack mentality studied a group of wolves that he had put together who were totally unrelated to one another and did not behave as a naturally formed wolf pack would do. Also dogs although related to wolves are not wolves and do not behave in the same way.

    I should imagine that your dogs don’t think that your husband is the leader, the reason that they behave with him is because they have learned that he doesn’t stand for any nonsense, whereas they are viewing you as more of a playmate. This doesn’t mean that you should shout or be strict or punish, but you need to be constant in what you do and say, be kind but firm and reward good behaviour.
     
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  12. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    I don't think any dog likes being grabbed. They will instinctively move away from anyone that tries and with very few exceptions, are much faster on their feet than the person trying to catch them. It's better to move away as dogs naturally follow something moving, and if you can move away, calling her and giving a nice reward at the end of it, you avoid the stress for all concerned.
     
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  13. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Also that men tend to have deeper voices, more reminiscent of the low growl that comes as a warning from other dogs. The pitch and tone of your voice makes a big difference in how dogs respond to you.
     
  14. Winniethepoodle

    Winniethepoodle PetForums Newbie

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    yes definitely
     
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