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Puppy advice needed please :)

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by DebsEvs, Jan 8, 2012.


  1. DebsEvs

    DebsEvs PetForums Newbie

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    Hiya, I have a 15week old staffy x husky and he is doing really well with training and I'm really pleased with him, the only thing about him he can never relax, I walk him everyday for up to 2 hours so I don't think it's boredom, I have taken him into work but he won't sit down and pee's all over, i keep the patio door open at home for him to come and go as he please's and he is constantly running around if he does sit down it will be for no longer than 2 mins and he is off again, he goes wild if I have guests to the point where I have to put him outside to chill out, he snaps at my son all of the time, if my son tries to play the dog will jump all over him at first it was funny but my son gets fed up and now sits upstairs most of the time unless the dog is in his crate, I know that pups have lots of energy but he seems to have the litters worth, I put him in his crate when I go to bed and can guarantee that within 2 mins of me walking away he will be snoring, I don't want to have to crate him every time my son comes downstairs or I have guests, I have spoken to the vet and he said that he will prob have the snip at 6 months to calm him down as he was concerned about the way the dog is with my son. Please help :scared:
     
  2. astro2011

    astro2011 PetForums VIP

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    I'm assuming you know about huskies? Also I don't recommend you walk him that long. He is still growing and the rule is normally 5 minutes per month. I go over this with my own pup, but not by much.

    The issues with the pup jumping at your son is just play. I really don't have anything more to say than it's most likely the husky in him that causes him to have a lot of energy.
     
  3. LisaZonda

    LisaZonda PetForums VIP

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    What she said :thumbup1: :D

    My husky pup is 10 weeks old and has ridiculous amounts of energy, my girls are ages 6 and 9...as much as they love her to bits, they get hell from that sharp, over excited little mouth, it is like living with a hyperactive, furry piranha!

    Embrace the chaos, its all part of the fun :D

    Edit : After reading that over again (its now the next morning) I notice I really wasn't very helpful! I think I had one too many glasses of red and was in "oh don't worry, it'll all be fine" mode :eek:....*Note to self : don't give advice when been on the booze* :001_unsure:
    p.s I haven't had enough sleep and have a slight hangover...not good on a monday morning :(
     
    #3 LisaZonda, Jan 8, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2012
  4. Catz1

    Catz1 PetForums VIP

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    Sounds like your pup is getting lots of exercise but no metal stimulation. Mental games tend to wear a puppy out much faster then walking. Have you thought of using a clicker to teach your pup some tricks? Using his daily meals as treats for good behaviour and feeding from a kong instead of a bowl are a great way of getting his brain going.
    This page has some good ideas but you'll find loads of great mind games if you google it..
    Mental Entertainment for Dogs
    If your puppy is jumping all over your son and nipping him then you need to teach him bite inhibition and some self control. Your pup only acts this way because he is yet to learn another form of appropriate play. There are some good stickys on this forum that talk about teaching bite inhibition. Have your son engage with the pup using toys so he can play without being bitten.
    Instead of putting your pup in a crate when your son or visitors are around you need to have him out so he can learn the proper way of greating people. Have him drag a light leash around the house so you can grab it and redirect your puppy when he's getting himself into trouble. Give plenty of praise and treats when he acts calmly. Give your visitors some treats and tell them to ask for a sit before greating him. This way your puppy will learn he gets attention and treats when he waits calmly.
    Dont forget you have a Husky mix so your puppy will be smart and have buckets of energy so you need to teach him proper manners :)
    I hope this helps!
     
  5. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Some of them really dont know how too quit, they can get so wound up and hyper that they literally cant and wont wind down on their own you literally have to enforce it. A lot of it is over stimulation and also they get overtired and then the nippy mouthy biting behaviour can begin, they literally dont have an off switch. Thats probably why he zonks out when you do put him in the crate at night hes exhausted himself.

    Like you said the diving at your son was funny at first, and Im guessing here but Im betting your son did all the rough housing play fighting back? If he did then likely there is the problem he has encouraged and rewarded it and the dog thinks thats what he is to do and its acceptable. If vitors also made all the cooing noises at him as a pup and excitedly greeted him and didnt correct the jumping up and carried on giving him attention again its rewarded it.

    He needs periods of activity followed by periods of rest, Two hours is miles to much for rapidly growing bones and soft delicate growth plates.
    Subsitute instead, shorter walks, and periods of training using reward based training, teaching him all the basics, trainings a calm way of interacting and improving focus on you and making him use his brain, it can mentally and physically tire without over stimulating.
    Stop any rough house wild hyper games thats going to send him into orbit.
    Substitute instead controlled games as part of the training working him towards making him sit and wait, chase and retrieve a ball, give it up by teaching drop, the running backwards and forwardsiis physical exercise but he has too concentrate and do mental challenges too.

    Get him things to amuse himself. Kongs that you stuff with food and he has to puzzle and work to get it out, you can get harder ones now like the genius and Kong Wobbler. Treat balls and other puzzle toys that you fill with kibble and set to distribute a piece here and there as he plays. There is other interactive toys too on the market, Plenty of chews like stag bars, they can chew and de-stress and get rid of fraustration on. Give him a wind down area with his bed and his interactive toys to wind down, and then rest in between the activity on his own with no stimulation.

    What are you feeding him? If its a very high protein high calorie food that likely is making him hyper and sending him into orbit. Ones with artificial colourings, flavourings, and preservaties can make dogshyper, supermarket ones and Bakers are known for it in some dogs, some are high sugar too, so the pups/ dogs, are high on a sugar rush. Years ago I was told not to feed sibes Eukanuba, that has them swinging from the light fittings. Over the years Ive spoken to people with extra nutty sibes and a few have been on it and other high powered food too. So look at his food as well. Might be part of the problem.

    Any nutty wild jumping up at you for attention, he must have nothing in reward, no speaking to him eye contact no, nos get down pushing him away, pushing away makes them bounce back more its a game then. Fold your arms turn you back and as your doing it say OFF. Keep turned away or walk off and totally ignore him, until he has calmed down, and stayed calm for a further minute or two, then call get him to sit, treats and attention. He sits first for anything attention, food treats everything. If he has to sit for everything it will become a conditioned response eventually when he wants sorething not bouncing all over you to get what he wants.

    If that doesnt work any time, out the room and leave him to calm down, then let him out but ignore him, if he stays calm a bit longer, the call over, the sit request then the treat and attention. Everyone has to follow it and do it every time too. its no good half of you doing it.

    ETA if you put him out and he comes back again the you just keep repeating the exercise over and over as long as it takes for him to get it.
     
    #5 Sled dog hotel, Jan 8, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 8, 2012
  6. DebsEvs

    DebsEvs PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you all so much for the advice, much appreciated x x :thumbsup:
     
  7. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    Hi, first of all, I have to comment on the amount of exercise you are giving your puppy.

    It is the equivalent of expecting a 3 year old to walk for two hours a day?

    Does that sound reasonable?

    So, what effect does this have on your dog?

    It makes him over tired, irritable and also an adrenaline junkie.

    The fact is, the more exercise you give a dog the more it wants, so if you are giving this dog 2 hours at 15 weeks, what do you think he will need at 12 months and beyond?

    Exercise releases endorphins (this is why people get addicted to exercise etc) it is not healthy in EXCESS.

    You need to teach your puppy impulse control so that he can develop it himself.

    You also need to teach him how to switch off, that is where the crate is useful, ie you can put him in there with a stuffed kong and teach your dog AND your son that when your pup is in the crate he is safe and can relax.

    This behaviour is not testosterone related so please do not have unrealistic expectations of what neutering can achieve.

    Here is a link re biting

    The Bite Stops Here by Dr Ian Dunbar

    Remember supermarkets sell some very high quality dog foods, such as Arden Grange, so not everything on their shelves is poor quality or filled with junk, any more than human food is. ;)

    Tests have shown that sugar has no impact on actual behaviour on either animals or humans (despite the perception) so that is not an actual concern, although sugar of course is unecessary for dogs. ;)

    I think it might help if you make up a rough timetable for your dog re eating, exercising, toileting and sleeping schedules.

    This will bring some organisation to the day, if you have a plan child rearing, puppy rearing and running a household tend to be much easier.

    HTH and Good Luck!
     
  8. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    I stand corrected then I dont know what food suits my own breed, or what implications certain things in the diet can have on their behaviour Certain super market foods like the Bakers specifically mentioned isnt full of colouring sugars and arficial stuff then and hasnt caused hyper activity and skin problems then, and when its been withdrawn from a dogs diet it hasnt made a difference. I imagined it when Ive changed a food that mine have gone from hyper and calmer especially with some of the puppy foods fine.
     
  9. smokeybear

    smokeybear PetForums VIP

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    I don't know who corrected you on most of the above, it certainly was not me, (as you will see if you actually read my post)

    However I will correct sweeping generalisations (as I always do) which imply that ALL dog foods sold in supermarkets are known for causing detrimental effects in dogs.

    Arden Grange is sold in supermarkets, and that is a high quality food which does not contain any of the ingrediens you allege to induce behavioural changes in dogs.

    As I will re sugar causing hyperactivity, there has been no scientific evidence to support this perception.

    Whereas there IS scientific evidence to support behavioural changes caused by colourings. ;)

    Yet another example of overgeneralisation, not only on foods but my post.

    If you had said in your original post that CERTAIN supermarket foods can cause problems I would have agreed with you. But you did not.

    As I keep saying, correlation is not causation.............
     
  10. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Its not correcting sweeping generalisations with you though or over generalisation, its nit picking as usual, and Im not the only one whos picked you up on it. You nit pick for the sake of it, same as you are rude and over bearing to people when you "offer" help sometimes. The fact that several people have commented on your posts now must say something.

    Just Because I said super market foods which most are crap as it happens, you just cant help yourself can you. You just have to pick holes.

    Apologies OK for taking your thread of track.
     
  11. LisaZonda

    LisaZonda PetForums VIP

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    I'm not sure how old your son is but definitely keep an on this, as SDH says....the puppy see's it all as acceptable behaviour and just continues with it.

    I have had this problem with my 6 year old Sophie, they start off playing lovely together but due to the age of them both it often turns into this over excited rough and tumble, which usually results in Sophie crying because Nikita bit her too hard or caught her teeth on her arm or whatever.

    I am constantly sitting Sophie down and trying to explain to her that she need to play calmly, the puppy is very young and doesn't understand, when she starts going mad jumping around the puppy will of course see this as encouragement and before much longer the whole situation gets out of hand.

    It is difficult with kids and puppies together....neither have the ability to listen properly when told the first time :rolleyes: If you think this could be one of the issues, have a chat to your son and explain to him how he needs to behave with puppy, it is lovely seeing the enjoyment they get out of playing together so hopefully this might help.
     
    #11 LisaZonda, Jan 9, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2012
  12. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    It is hard or can be with young kids and puppies, as both love to play both can equally get over excited at times so tend to as you said hype each other up.

    Its not always the younger kids though, older kids and it seems a lot of the time males even adult ones, will rough and tumble with a dog especially if a large breed.

    It is an easy mistake to make though, when you first get a pup in general especially if a first time owner, its something that doesnt occur to everyone when pup first arrives and why really should it, its just play initially not a problem.
     
  13. terencesmum

    terencesmum PetForums VIP

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    Back to the OP :eek:

    I would say stop walking your dog for 2 hours. FAR too much.

    Also, the type of x you have would be highly unlikely to be able to settle himself. Terence is a full Staffie and he is dreadful at settling himself. I need to stick him in a crate when I know he is tired. He can only settle himself when the kids are away, tv off and not much noise.

    The behaviour your pup is exhibiting towards your son isn't aggressive or anything that would stop if he gets the snip. This can be easily stopped if you are being consistent with telling him No and ignoring him for a while when he nips etc. The Dunbar link is quite helpful with nipping.

    I personally think having the snip at 6 months is far too young. If you want to have him done, wait until he is fully matured.

    Re food: There are many excellent stickies in the health section about dry food, wet food or raw, so all the info is there.
    Have fun with your pup. :)
     
  14. Dober

    Dober PetForums VIP

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    I would also add that gettig him enrolled in some sort of puppy obedience would be a great idea. No strenuous excersise, but very tiring for puppies as well as helping with socialisation and training. Make sure you research your class thoroughly and choose someone wih positive methods :)
     
  15. Goblin

    Goblin PetForums VIP

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    Can you give independent sources? All I've found is either in relation to children, not dogs and the general information sugar should be avoided by dogs.

    In regards to The children with the Attention Deficit Hypperactivity Disorder the Feingold Study shows how additives including sugar can make a difference.

    Langseth L, Dowd J. Glucose tolerance and hyperkinesis. Fd Cosmet Toxicol 1978;16:129-133. found 74 percent of 261 hyperactive children manifested abnormal glucose tolerance in response to a sucrose meal.

    There is some debate in the Feingold circles if other studies have had their outcomes influenced by industry interests in a manner inconsistent with good scientific research.
     
    #15 Goblin, Jan 9, 2012
    Last edited: Jan 9, 2012
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