Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Puppies - how much exercise?

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by joxand, Apr 19, 2011.


  1. joxand

    joxand PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi,

    We're due to collect our new Doberman puppy in a couple of weeks. We already have a dog (a greyhound) and have had dogs in the past, but we've never had a puppy before as they've always been rescue dogs.

    I've been reading that you should be careful not to over exercise a puppy as it can damage them as they are growing. So, I'm wondering how to work out how much is too much? Is it just a case of watching them to see if they are getting tired or should I limit the walk to a few hundred yards and do this 2 or 3 times a day? The puppy will have had both vaccinations when we collect it, so as I understand there should be no problem with going out.

    Thanks
    Jo.
     
  2. WestYorkshireGuy

    WestYorkshireGuy PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Aug 15, 2010
    Messages:
    229
    Likes Received:
    2
    Hi there.

    A good rule of thumb is a puppy should be walked 5 minutes for every month of age. So an 8 week old pup shouldn't be walked for more than 10 minutes.

    2 x 10 minute walks should be fine for an 8 week old puppy.
     
  3. Ducky

    Ducky PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Nov 23, 2008
    Messages:
    4,349
    Likes Received:
    65
    a lot of people go by the 5minutes for every month rule.

    so if the pup is 8 weeks when you get it, that would be a 10 minute walk. but you can do this a couple of times a day. its also only based on like hard ground walking, not free roaming on softer ground. but that still watch your timing with that too.
     
  4. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    21,576
    Likes Received:
    665
    The general rule is 5 mins per month of age. :)

    Now let me explain, a lot of people scoff at that rule, how on EARTH can I keep my puppy exercised at THAT rate??

    The rule was made by a friend of mine, who is incredibly knowledgeable about dog health, and retrievers in particular, and I count myself lucky to be one of his friends, and I have made use of his knowledge many times. So, what does the rule mean? It's simple, it refers to forced exercise, where you stick a collar and lead on a pup and walk it. Play exercise, is just that, and all pups need to play to develop. The only thing you need to watch with play, is over excitement, where a pup continues long after it's tired.

    Good luck with your new pup, Dobes are fabulous, a breed I have long admired :)
     
  5. joxand

    joxand PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    What a quick response from lots of people - fabulous!

    The '5 minute for every month' rule is really helpful to know. That's exactly the kind of thing I was looking for - I'm so glad I found this place :001_smile:

    Thanks
    Jo.
     
  6. tiddliewink

    tiddliewink PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2011
    Messages:
    23
    Likes Received:
    0
    Not suggesting anything wrong but, wonder how come the pup will have had its 2 vac's when you get it. :confused:

    Any breeder worth their salt, will give you all this type of information. Next time you contact them ask what information will be in the 'puppy pack'
     
  7. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    39,822
    Likes Received:
    10,365
    With a large breed like a dobie, they do have rapid bone growth, so you do need to take care during these periods especially. Everything is also new and strange and they have to get used to sights sounds and situations they have never probably encountered before and that initially can be frightening. So out for too long can be too much at first and take them over threshold of what they can cope with. Usually "rule of thumb" is 5 minutes walking per month of life, 2 or 3 times a day, so a 12 week pup would be about 15min walks give or take slightly. If you need to keep them occupied in between, then a couple of 10/15minute training sessions a day mixed with a bit of play tires them out physically and mentally too. They are usually receptive and eager to please at this age, so beginning a bit of basic training is a good idea.
     
  8. joxand

    joxand PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think it's because the pup will be 10 weeks when we collect him. I've read of several breeders who get both vaccinations done before letting the pup go so that they can socialise straightaway. Also, as I understand it, there can be a problem if the breeder only has the first vaccination done in that unless your vet has the same vaccine to do the second one, they have to start again and do both vaccinations meaning that the pup gets jabbed more than they need to be.

    I will definitely ask what will be in the puppy pack when I next talk to them. They did tell us when we viewed the pups but I didn't write it down so I can't remember all the details. Thanks for reminding me about it.

    Cheers
    Jo.
     
  9. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    21,576
    Likes Received:
    665
    Without meaning to sound contentious, why does a dobe have a more rapid bone growth than a Yorkshire terrier, where does this myth come from?
     
  10. Sleeping_Lion

    Sleeping_Lion Banned

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2009
    Messages:
    21,576
    Likes Received:
    665
    I'm off to get a very small nightap before beddie byes, but please, after reading back, the 5 min rule applies across the board. This is a general rule to help prevent you over exercising your dog, whether big or small. For some bizarre reason, people associate big with hip dysplasia and joint problems, and yet, one of the known contributors to the Labrador retriever as we know it today, was a greyhound, the pedigree is listed in there for those with databases. Is a greyhound bigger than a Labrador, yes, do greyounds suffer from more joint problems, I'd hazard a wild guess at no, so why this assumption that bigger equals more joint problems? When history has shown us that the introduction of a larger breed doesn't necessarily bring in joint problems, but healthy joints??
     
  11. haeveymolly

    haeveymolly PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2009
    Messages:
    12,690
    Likes Received:
    321
    I think when talking about walking a pup, bone growth and development also bone/joint damage its not just about exercise look at a food that is not too high in protein a food that is high in protein is the reason for too rapid growth, too rapid growth can cause skeletal problems, ive seen people stick to the 5 min rule but stuff the puppy full of protein, i gave my pups burns mini bites Mr Burns is vet and promotes slow growth in puppies, i never stuck to rule tbh but made sure mine was off lead on grass and even surfaces there is no way my pups(springers) could manage with a 15 min walk at 3 months old, they were chasing around the house and garden, up the steps in to the house skating all over the place i figured this was much more harmfull that walking, walking naturally rather than legs splayed out so they were walked on an even grassy surface maybe at 3 months about 30mins. None of mine have ever had any joint problems at all well not up to now.

    Good luck with your new pup and look forward to seeing some pictures.:)
     
  12. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    39,822
    Likes Received:
    10,365
    I know someone who breeds racing greyhounds, and talking to them regarding breeding, it appears that the incidence of in breeding and line breeding is practically non existant. They are a healthy breed which I would assume a lot comes from genetic diversity.

    A larger breed would have higher metabolic demands for their rapid growth rate for starters. The post is about a Dobermann a large breed, therefore I was speaking about a Dobermann not a yorkshire terrier. If the post was about a yourkshire terrier I would have still advised the 5min rule of thumb.

    The Longitudinal growth of a bone occurs at the ends, rather than in the middle of the bone, when growth is occuring the epiphyseal plates tend to be enlarged especially on large breeds ie Malamutes for example. The degree of the enlargement is often an indication of the eventual size of the dog . Whilst bone growth is occuring, bumpy areas can be felt, on the cheeks and skull,
    and seen most noticeably on the front pasterns.

    Obviously a dog that goes from a Kg or so to 50Kg Plus and a height of 66-71cms in its first year as in an Alaskan Malamute putting on maybe 1-2Kg a week. Is going to have a more rapid growth overall than say a Yorkshire Terrier whos only going to go from between 2.5oz - 5.5oz at birth to around
    a total of 2 - 6lbs in a year with a maximum height of 8inches.
    personally I cant see how its a myth, large breeds have more growing to do and do it rapidly. Not exactly rocket science.

    Regarding the subject of greyhound health versus Labrador, as far as I can see on a quick check Labs seem to have an average hip score or 13, plus Incidence of elbow displasia, as far as I can see Grreyhounds have none at all problem wise with hips and elbows.
     
    #12 Sled dog hotel, Apr 20, 2011
    Last edited: Apr 20, 2011
  13. Maiisiku

    Maiisiku Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2009
    Messages:
    4,561
    Likes Received:
    27
    The 5 min rule is genrally good to go by, but that is for hard surfaces. They can walk a bit further on grass etc as their bones are not quite as impacted. I walk Aya with Yuri for 40 mins but it is mainly on grass, only the first 5-10 mins is on path. Sometimes we will go a bit further but it is on grass and we do take rest invivals so she can rest up as I wouldn't want to over do it for her. She is 5 months.
     
  14. joxand

    joxand PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    I've just read (in a list of 'golden rules' for puppies in the breed specific book I'm reading) that you shouldn't let a puppy climb up and down steps/stairs for the the first year.

    Do others follow this rule? It seems a bit excessive to wait for a whole year. We live on a hill with a number of steps on the paths that run between the houses and we have about 10 steps from our front door to road level. It's not a problem to start with, but I don't much fancy carrying a growing Doberman pup up and down the steps. I've had to carry my very accident-prone greyhound up and down more times than I care to remember so I'm sure I'll manage but would prefer not to if it's not really necessary.

    Jo.
     
  15. joxand

    joxand PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2011
    Messages:
    13
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks!

    Oh, I'm sure I'll inundate everyone with pictures as soon as we get him :001_smile:

    Here's a fuzzy pic that I took on my phone when we went to see him last week.

    Dobie_01.jpg


    Jo.
     
  16. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    39,822
    Likes Received:
    10,365
    Aww Hes cute, Ive got a soft spot for Dobies, my Dad had two and my sister has one, they are great dogs.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice