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Proving Cat Ownership

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by RamblingRose, Jun 3, 2017.


  1. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry to be long winded, but I could really use some advice....


    Until last week I worked at a residential home for adults with learning disabilities and/or mental health illnesses . One of the residents bought a kitten on Gumtree after gaining permission from the home's manager. The female, non- pedigree, kitten was approximately four or five months old. After a week or two it became apparent that the kitten was pregnant. The resident was supported with cat care and eventually the cat gave birth. There were complications with labour and staff at the home supported the resident with seeking veterinary assistance. Thankfully the litter was born and the resident was left with a large bill and given two weeks to pay it.

    The resident then, 2 days later, decided that they could not cope with the kitten and her litter.

    I offered to rehome the kitten and her litter and the resident signed a piece of paper giving me the kitten and her litter. I transported them all to my home and they settled in well. Mum and babies are thriving.

    This is where it gets complicated!.......

    I left my job at the home 3 days later due to other staff being unpleasant to me. I have handed in my notice and am signed of sick until my notice runs out and my contract of employment expires.

    I do not have a copy of the paper on which the resident signed the kitten and her litter over to me.... I do,however, have witnesses ( nice staff members).


    Am I liable for the large labour related veterinary bill incurred before the kitten family were signed over to me?

    The resident may change her mind about signing the cat over to me and I am concerned that the nastier staff at the home may "loose" the paper that the resident signed. If the resident does indeed change her mind - am I obligated to hand the kitten family back?

    If there is indeed an ownership dispute I am wondering where I stand? The resident was not given a receipt or any paperwork when the kitten was delivered by its former owners. All the resident has is the invoice for the veterinary bill.

    The kitten family are settled at my home and the teeny kittens are now a week old and doing well. Mum is fantastic and doing all the hard work.

    I have booked mum and babies into my local veterinary surgery to be checked in a few weeks. I am happy to pay for worming and flea treatments etc and any other veterinary costs since I took them on. I have also booked mum in to be neutered in eight weeks and plan to keep her indoors until this occurs - ensuring that she doesn't mate again. I have also booked for her to be microchipped with my details while she is under the neutering anaesthetic .

    As for the teeny kittens, they have doubled their birth weight and doing really well.

    If anyone has any advice or knowledge to share I'd be very grateful!

    The resident who signed the family over is prone to mood swings, destructiveness and challenging behaviours. Other residents in the home are the same.

    I am truly worried that the little family would suffer if they went back.

    Should I microchip the teeny kittens too? Would microchipping prove ownership of the kittens?

    Please help!
     
  2. TallulahCat

    TallulahCat PetForums VIP

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    The paper he signed is not for him, it is for you. It's a bit weird that the home have kept the original (they would be entitled to a copy of course). Can you contact any of your better colleagues and ask them to slip you a photocopy?

    As the bill was incurred before you own the cat, you shouldn't be liable for it. The resident would have given the vet his contact details, not yours, so the vet will have no way to chase you anyway.

    Microchipping can be used as evidence of ownership. If he decided he wanted them back, the onus would be on him to show that you somehow duped the vet into chipping them and lied about ownership. The signed letter will show otherwise.

    The kittens will be too small to be microchipped at this point. In 8 weeks time they could probably be microchipped along with mum though. Or you might want to wait until they are neutered and have the chipping done under anaesthetic. Best to seek your vet's advice on this.

    How many kittens are there? Do you intend keeping them all? We love photos here!
     
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  3. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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  4. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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    There are five, this photo was taken hours after they were born.
     
  5. TallulahCat

    TallulahCat PetForums VIP

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    Oh they are beauties!
     
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  6. moggie14

    moggie14 PetForums VIP

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    Completely agree with @TallulahCat
    I see no reason why the resident would want the cats back, unless out of spite?
     
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  7. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you!


    I'm afraid that I have another question!!!!

    The lovely boy in my avatar photo is Seamus, my own cat. He's eight and totally spoiled...... at what point should I introduce him to the mum and her kittens? I have so managed to keep them apart at different ends of my home. Any tips on how to ease introductions would be gratefully appreciated! ☺️
     
    #7 RamblingRose, Jun 3, 2017
    Last edited: Jun 3, 2017
  8. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    i would not introduce Seamus until the kittens are older, running about and starting to eat solids. This is usually around 4 to 5 weeks. Before that the mum cat will be very protective of her kittens and she may be hostile or aggressive to Seamus. Worse case could be that she might attack or kill her kittens if she feels they are at risk from another adult cat.
     
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  9. buffie

    buffie Mentored by Meeko

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    TBH I wouldn't introduce Seamus at all until the kittens are a good bit older as apart from a danger of him hurting small kittens mum will I imagine be very protective of them for a good while yet and will no doubt attack him as she doesn't know who he is.
    If this were to happen then it would not be helpful in any future relations between Seamus and the mother cat.
    Another thing that would concern me about allowing intro's would be if Seamus is a cat that is allowed to go outdoors he could bring infection in to the kittens and mum for that matter.
     
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  10. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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    Mum and little Wicket
     

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  11. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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    Dark tortoise shell is Chewbacca

    The mostly black one is ObiWan
     

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  12. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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    Light tortoise shell is Jabba

    Black with white tummy and socks isYoda
     

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  13. Erenya

    Erenya PetForums VIP

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    Surely, unless someone at the home gives the resident your contact details they would have no way to get in touch anyway.

    If someone at the home DOES give the resident your contact details they've MASSIVELY breached the data protection act by passing on confidential hr data and you can contact the ICO and make a formal complaint.
     
  14. havoc

    havoc PetForums VIP

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    You never entered into any contract with the vet so they have no claim against you. Whether they have a valid claim against the resident will rely on that resident being deemed to have capacity to enter into such a contract.
     
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  15. bluecordelia

    bluecordelia Footy

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    I second all of the above. I would see if someone can get you a copy of the letter.

    Be warned though as people can be disciplined if they take photos on "health" premises. I.e. Use of camera phones. You are not liable for the vet bill. Do not pay it as you did not enter into a contract with the vet.
     
  16. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you all so much!


    It looks as if the previous owner has lost all interest in the mum and her kittens! Phew!!!

    The kittens are doing so well. Their mum is fantastic and all is well!


    I have another question however!!!!

    Has anyone else here wanted to keep their enire litter of kittens forever?!

    I have completely and utterly fallen in love with mum and all her little ones! My husband also loves them!

    Those of you who have been in my position- how did you cope?

    I love cats, but we have always males and had them neutered at the earliest possible opportunity as we don't want to add to the unwanted cat/kitten problem. Now we have a mum and her litter we have turned into complete emotional softies!

    if we do manage to pluck up the courage to rehome any of them, I want them to be neutered and to be regularly de-wormed and flea treated etc. I also want them to be pampered etc! But if they live with someone else we would not be able to ensure this!

    So, how do we emotionally detach from our cats?!!!
     
  17. Calvine

    Calvine PetForums VIP

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    She is a sweet-looking girl! And she has done an amazing job considering her age.
     
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  18. RamblingRose

    RamblingRose PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you Calvin! She truly is a beauty!
     
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  19. havoc

    havoc PetForums VIP

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    Every single one from every litter :)
    Here's how it's always been for me -
    For the first couple of weeks it isn't even thought about.
    Weeks 2 - 6/7 I can't imagine letting them go, can't think I'll ever find anyone I trust enough to have one.
    Weeks 8 - 10 I start meeting the prospective new owners as they visit to book their kitten and I find they're lovely people who are actually perfectly capable of looking after my precious babies.
    Weeks 11 - 13 I start really feeling the hard work and expense of these kittens and am becoming ready to let them go.
    Weeks 13 - 14. One by one the kittens are collected by their new owners and I cry buckets at every one :)
     
  20. Calvine

    Calvine PetForums VIP

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    Mum is a slip of a thing, isn't she?
     
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