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Protein level of dog food

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by kaz, Jan 18, 2008.


  1. kaz

    kaz PetForums Junior

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    I know that there has been a very informative dog food thread but does anyone know what level of protein is best for dogs?
     
  2. Debbie

    Debbie PetForums VIP

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    It depends on what your dog does etc, all dried foods have a varying amount of protein for a reason - ie - high levels of protein are needed for working dogs or those that are doing activities like hunting - puppies and bitchs in whelp need a higher protein in their diet too. :)
     
  3. Rickygee23

    Rickygee23 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi: There is a website where you can get information on the level of protein in puppy food.
    this website is: www.carimbosproducts.com - Home. (check it out).


    Ricardo.
     
  4. Fleur

    Fleur Vassal to Lilly and Ludo

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    I use Burns and that has a 20% protein level.
    The reason I use Burns is because I was told by my dog trainer to look for a food that had all natural ingredients with less than 25% protein, My understanding is pet dogs can't process to much protein and high levels can effect them in later life, such as Kidney disease.

    I don't know if thats true, I'm not an expert.

    Another school of thought is to feed Orijen which has 40% protein, the thought behind this is that is is made only of meat and fruit/veg so has the correct proteins for dogs to digest.
     
    #4 Fleur, Jan 10, 2009
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2009
  5. Kelsey

    Kelsey PetForums Junior

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    I think that if you have a high protein food for your dog you'll feed less of it than if you had a low protein food.

    EG: A 15kg bag of food that is 30% protein on a 30kg dog would last a little longer than a 15kg bag of food that is 20% protien but the activity level and general appetite of your dog would probably have an effect on this. You couldn't just feed your dog a 30% protein food just because it was cheaper if it didn't suit the dog.

    I would only put a dog on a low protien (less than 25%) if they were old or overweight. These foods tend to be bulked out with more rice and so the dog thinks he / she has eaten more. Basically, it doesn't really matter what the protein level is - if you have a high protein one, you'll feed less and if you have a low protein one, you'll feed slightly more - the protein then balances itself out, hence why there are feeding guidelines.

    The average protein level for adult foods is 25% on adult maintenance diets. You'd feed a 30% protein to puppies or working or show dogs with high activity - just like Debbie says.

    I think the ingredient content, where its sourced from, if its hypoallergenic is much more important personally!
     
  6. Freyja

    Freyja PetForums VIP

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    I feed red mills tracker which has 20% protein and is made fo resting and convalesing greyhounds. I used to feed the one for racing greyhounds 28% protein but William went loopy .As if he was full of nervous energy and although the whippets put weight on he actually lost weight as he was just burning it all of. Yes they didn't have to be fed the same amounts as with the lower protein but William started to put weight on and began to settle down when we changed his food.

    I think what amount of protein you feed depends on the dog you are feeding. I'm lucky as all mine do well on the same food even the setter eats the greyhound food.
     
  7. Certaining the 'quality' of the protien needs to be observed, as does what your dogs do active & working dogs need higher protien levels then senior dogs. Pups are always a concern with me as too fast a growth and two higher protien levels can be damaging in later years.
    regards
    DT
     
  8. Kelsey

    Kelsey PetForums Junior

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    Absolutely agree 100%! :thumbup1:
     
  9. jessejazza

    jessejazza PetForums Junior

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    Could you expand a bit further on him losing weight please? I switched my greyhound [11yrs] and lurcher [3-4 yrs] to wet [i.e. plain meat with biscuit]. The greyhound has started losing weight and the lurcher is putting it on [even with long runs across the local disused airfield - so exercise isn't the problem]. Both fed twice a day - lurcher on 6 oz + 2 oz mixer and greyhound 8oz + 4oz mixer. lurcher weighs 19kg [17 should be about right i reckon] and greyhound 22 [down from 25kg].

    To lower protein level i need to decrease meat and increase biscuit? There must be some ratio to get the balance right?
     
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