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Problem Dog - Help!

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Arcmedic, Feb 3, 2008.


  1. Arcmedic

    Arcmedic PetForums Newbie

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    I have 3 dogs - Choc Lab, Collie and a Rottador (Lab/Rott Cross). The Choc and Collie I have had from pups, from the Rottador was a rescue when we got him at 8 months old. He had bought originally by drug addicts who had abused him.

    At the start was the Collie (who is now 3) and then we got the Rott as a rescue (Who is now 3). Similar ages, at first they got on together ok, but the Rott has always had an 'attitude problem' shall we say, alarm barking, aggression over toys. This would come to ahead that when we took them out and let them off the lead, he would jealously try and fend my collie off from playing with other dogs by chasing him and biting into his side or aggressively barking into his ear. This creates worried looks when people see the 2 dogs hurtling towards their dogs, one wants to play the other wants to stop one from playing.

    On 2 occasions, the rott has bitten the collie, this has required an operation and stitches both times in these pursuits.

    Since we got the choc lab as a pup, he has not bothered with it and even plays with it happily. I suspect since the choc lab is 10kg heavier than him he is a bit more wary.

    The aggression still persists, such as grumbling when getting off of furniture or sneaking onto the bed when he clearly knows that it outside his boundaries. If he 'steals' anything he hides under the bed and bears teeth, growls if you try and retrieve it.

    I have most things, not hitting him, showing affection, asking him nicely but this turn of aggression still exists. What is more worrying is my wife is almost 30 weeks pregnant, and as much as an animal lover that she is, she is getting extremely worried that 1 second alone with the baby he might attack it.

    At the moment he is on the lead and I don't trust him off it. I have phoned the dog rescue we got him from (no answer - Sunday) and have set him strict boundaries, he is actually a very loving dog in the house, affectionate, and at times quiet, but it is so Jekyll and Hyde turn of mood that is worrying us the most.

    Is this something that we can ever train out? or should after 2 years of having him return him to the trust (which would break both mine and my wifes heart to do). I already understand that we can't risk the baby at all.

    Advice appreciated.

    Michael
     
  2. Jenny Olley

    Jenny Olley PetForums VIP

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    Hi Michael, no-one can answer how your dog will be with your new baby, but from your post you may have a problem. No dog however trustworthy should be left alone with a baby or young child, even for a second.

    I would get some professional help asap, your baby will be too precious to take risks with, hopefully you will get someone from the rescue centre on Monday.
     
  3. Eolabeo

    Eolabeo Guest

    Sorry but i wouldnt trust that dog around my children end of.

    Maybe you have got attached to the dog but what if he turned on one of your children? ( god forbid ) would'nt be me taking that risk.
     
  4. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

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    Hi Michael, you CANNOT ask a dog nicely. Please, please remember, that he is a DOG not a human being. He does not think like a human, he does not reason like a human being, so you cannot expect him to respond like a human being.

    It sounds like he is acting as pack leader, putting everyone in their place, including you. In order to resume control, you MUST seek professional advice for this problem. Babies and children are unsafe with dogs who have gained pack leader status, and nobody can give you the type of advice required on a forum.

    If you have insurance, ask for a vet referral to a behaviourist. You need a consultation before starting any rehabilitation programme, and you will only have to pay the excess.

    Good luck.
     
  5. Sam88Smith

    Sam88Smith PetForums Newbie

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    if it was me i would try to rehome him. i know it will be extremely hard for you coz you love him but your child should come over any dog.
    i have a 10 week old border collie and i wont dare leave her in the room alone with my 2 year old and 8 month old!
    hope you work things out,
    sam x:confused:
     
  6. Jo P

    Jo P PetForums VIP

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    Excellent advice from Nina - this cant be dealt with on a forum - try again to get the rescue centre as they may be able to help and also get a referral to a behaviourist.

    Can I just ask are the dogs entire??
     
  7. garryd

    garryd Guest

    I gota agree with Eolabeo,way to risky for my tastes !:(
     
  8. Nina

    Nina PetForums VIP

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    Sam, you CANNOT pass this problem on. Aggression in all dogs needs expert help, and as I said previously, you CANNOT deal with this kind of problem on a forum.

    I just hope that my advice is taken on this one.
     
  9. chirpyyorkshire

    chirpyyorkshire PetForums Newbie

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    Please get qualified help and support. A friend of mine had a similar dog and it bit their child - unfortunately the dog is no more. Don't let it get to that, get qualified help and support. Until then, if your dog is aggressive then separate him - put him in another room. Dogs need to be shown that they are not the leaders- you are. If he growls, out of the room away from everyone else, or if outside - turn your back on him.

    Best of luck - you never know, the right training could help him become a family dog.
     
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