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Probiotics for Dogs

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Quinzell, Jun 10, 2011.


  1. PennyGSD

    PennyGSD PetForums Senior

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    Pretty sure they all still work to indiscriminently kill or encourage bacteria though, even if the bacteria themselves are different.

    As I'm allergic to penicillin I'm often prescribed metronizadole. Metronizadole is a common antibiotic used in dogs, so I'm guessing they ain't fussy about what sorts they kill or encourage. Kind of the point really.

    However, needs more reading up as it may be that the probiotics help the good stuff overcome the bad (apparently - after a quick Google, but can't find a reliable source just yet)
     
    #21 PennyGSD, Oct 22, 2014
    Last edited: Oct 22, 2014
  2. Old Shep

    Old Shep PetForums VIP

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    Some of the organisms in probiotics are host specific- they will not adhere to gut mucosa in a different species. Unless the organism adheres to the gut, it will be ineffective. It will just be pooped out without doing anything at all.

    Better spending your money on probiotics specifically manufactured for a canine gut.
     
  3. Old Shep

    Old Shep PetForums VIP

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    .........just checking my shares in Big Pharma. 'Scuse me.


    :cool:
     
  4. mollypip

    mollypip PetForums Senior

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    Theres a strain of bacteria called E Faecium which is hugely important for dogs and as far as Im aware only found in dog probiotics, it wont be in human ones.
     
  5. Hopeattheendofthetunnel

    Hopeattheendofthetunnel PetForums VIP

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    Be careful with the Vitamin C.

    As dogs, unlike us, make their own Vit. C there is some fairly plausible evidence that if we supplement this vitamin - especially for an extended period of time - the dog's inherent production of it diminishes.

    Meaning that you are either stuck to give it forever or have to withdraw it gradually - bit like cortisone - to kickstart their inert production again.

    Like mollypip I used to routinely give ester-c for years, not sure in hindsight whether this was necessarily wise.

    But if you only plan to give it for a week or so you are unlikely to cause any issues.
     
  6. mollypip

    mollypip PetForums Senior

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    I didnt know supplementing with ester c could cause a production problem, oh dear! I give it to my Lab for her mild hip dysplasia, as theres some evidence it helps, and it does help her mobility (alongside Cartrophen and other supplements). As I plan to continue it for the rest of her life hopefully I wont be causing a problem .:eek:
     
  7. Hopeattheendofthetunnel

    Hopeattheendofthetunnel PetForums VIP

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    If you carry on giving it to your girl she will have no problems whatsoever.

    I simply didn't know for a very long time that dogs even COULD make their own Vit.C. Which is why I happily gave a daily Ester-C to my youngsters and continued it. By the time I did learn about it, I HAD to continue giving it. I seriously doubt it did them any harm, but it most probably was an unnecessary expense and daft supplement for a young, fit dog.

    Your girl will be fine, do not worry. :)
     
  8. Old Shep

    Old Shep PetForums VIP

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    I don't think (the bold part) is accurate.
     
  9. Hopeattheendofthetunnel

    Hopeattheendofthetunnel PetForums VIP

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    You could well be right.

    At the time, shutting down the dog's own Vit C production via supplementation was widely suggested. I do know they reformulated quite a few products, e.g Cosequin, because of it.

    Whether by now they have reached a different conclusion again - I am not aware of such.

    What do your sources say?
     
  10. Old Shep

    Old Shep PetForums VIP

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    Dogs synthisyse vitamin C in their liver using an enzyme (L- guluno-y-lactone oxidase). This is the enzyme u
    Humans lack, which means they must ingest vitamin C.

    Vitamin C is water soluble and is excreted via the kidneys (which is why you can't overdose on it- unlike the fat soluble vitamins ADE and K)

    I cannot understand a mechanism whereby supplimentation would suppress the production of the enzyme necessary to synthisise it in dogs.

    It just doran make sense to me.

    It's not the same as steroids at all.
     
  11. Daffers

    Daffers PetForums Junior

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    Yumpro is a good product too - especially for dogs !!
     
  12. Abby McEvoy

    Abby McEvoy PetForums Newbie

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    My rescue dog is currently taking steroids after recently having meningitis. His tummy was always a little soft anyway but it’s a lot worse now he’s taking steroids. Is there anything I can give him to help firm him up that won’t work against the steroids?.
    Was thinking of the Bionic Biotic but he will need to be on these tablets for some time so will it actually work?
    Is there a good sensitive dog food anyone can recommend that might help also?
    I was told by my vet a higher protein and higher fibre content but won’t a higher fibre content make him go to toilet more rather than firm him up?
    Thanks in advance
     
  13. Silverpaw

    Silverpaw PetForums Junior

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    Yudigest used here on an ongoing basis and Dorwest Tree Barks Powder when needed.This seems pretty effective but my dog had just about every test going to eliminate anything underlying his poorly tummy at vets first.Lily's Kitchen Recovery Recipe has been brilliant for him.Contains chicken,potato and banana,so obviously avoid if allergic to any of those.Hope you find something to help,I know how worrying it can be.
     
    Mum2Heidi likes this.
  14. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    I've just started my new rehomed dog on Bionic Biotic , it's brilliant stuff, my old girl was on it almost continuously for gut problems.
    My new boy has had very soft stools since we got him so he's on a diet of Chappie gradually transitioning to Forthglade, plus the Bionic Biotic.
    I always keep Prokolin in too.
     
    Mum2Heidi likes this.
  15. Mum2Heidi

    Mum2Heidi PetForums VIP

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    When Heidi was a year old she had an ongoing tum upset. I was continually back at the vets for repeat meds. Went on for months until I used Bionic Biotics. Worked very quickly and was my “go to” for years.

    More recently she had reflux issues and I Yudigest worked better.
    Slippery Elm Powder. (Similar to Dorwest Treebarks). Is very healing and soothing.

    For us, Bionic Biotics = lower digestive tract, Yudigest = upper and Slippery Elm somewhere in between.
     
  16. CheddarS

    CheddarS PetForums VIP

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    YumDigest here (was previously known as YumPro) alongside Kefir...works well as maintenance for my raw fed boy.
     
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