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Post PU Advice If Possible.

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by sskmick, Sep 28, 2013.


  1. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

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    Some background information. 3 years ago Sooty was straining to wee, one morning he was in so much pain he was gingerly crawling low along the floor.

    I took him immediately to the vet, and he had a blockage in his urethra. His bladder was so full it almost ruptured. He had emergency treatment, an abdominal drain to his bladder and they tried to catheter him to free the blockage. Unfortunately they couldn't unblock him, over the course of a few days they tried to catheter him to unblock his urethra but without success the only way to drain his bladder was abdominally.

    On their last attempt, I was told that there was nothing else that could be done, if they weren't successful. This was because of the damage and risk of infection to his urethra. Fortuntely they were successful but they were reluctant to remove the catheter because of the amount of crystal build up, there was fear of another blockage.

    In view of the severity of his condition and after having lengthy discussions with his vet it was decided the best option for him to have a normal life would be for him to have a Perineal Urethostomy (PU) operation. After the operation I was told I would have to watch for signs of infection from now on.

    Not long after moving here, I noticed he had an infection (straining to wee, cleaning himself more than usual, blood in his urine). I took him to our new vet and on our second visit was given the correction medication for him. I assumed it was the stress of moving here that triggered his behaviour of over cleaning causing him to bleed resulting in infection.

    Unfortunately he is presenting the same symptoms. This is now two infections within a year. He is 5 years old, he is currently being treated but I just wonder what his long term prognosis is.

    My original undertanding was that he would live a full normal life, Has anyone got any experience of the long term prognisis for cats after a PU.

    The little chap is very uncomfortable, but very loving and affectionate. I am now questioning whether having the PU was the right decision.

    I'm feeling a bit upset at the moment, he is on my lap purring away, bless him.
     
  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Sorry to hear your boy is poorly. As he has had PU surgery this should have made it easier for him to pass small crystal deposits before they get large enough to cause a blockage.

    Can you explain what methods you've been using to reduce the risk of him repeatedly getting crystals in his bladder, e.g. what diet is he on (hopefully he has not been fed any dry food at all since he had the first episode of blocked urethra).

    Are the crystals "struvite" or "oxalate"? Each has a different cause and requires different treatment.

    Bladder Crystals in Cats | eHow

    For prevention of struvite crystals the ph of the urine needs to be slightly acidic, and this is achieved by feeding a good quality wet food that is high in meat protein, such as e.g. Grau, Animonda, CatzFineFood, Macs or OmNomNom. Even better, would be a balanced raw diet. Feed no dry food at all.

    Avoid all foods that contain gluten, such as maize, wheat etc. and avoid foods with additives as far as possible. Also check the magnesium levels in the food are not high.

    Keep up fluid intake at all times by adding a little water to the wet food, and also make home made chicken broth or beef broth and feed him a warmed saucerful twice a day. If you cook up a panful of broth, you can then freeze it in ice cube trays, so it keeps better and you always have some to hand to defrost for him.

    Oxalate crystals are more likely to occur in cats where the urine ph is acidic and the calcium levels in the blood are high. This could be caused by an excessive intake of calcium, sodium, protein or Vit D. Again the diet should be a good quality wet food, and fluid intake should be increased considerably to make the urine more dilute.

    Ensure he is getting plenty of exercise. If he is an indoor cat, provide lots of climbing opportunities for him, such as ceiling high cat trees, or put shelves up a wall like this:

    cat shelf - Yahoo! Image Search Results

    Play with him interactively using a Da Bird fishing rod toy and if you have stairs encourage him to race up and down chasing ping pong balls you throw for him. Also get a laser light and play with him.

    If he is not very motivated to play and exercise, maybe consider investing in a McLaw Exercise Wheel, which is also interactive:-

    Cat Exercise Wheels - The Maclaw Wheel

    You use the laser light to get him running, and then you guide him on to the wheel. :)
     
  3. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

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    Thank you for your reply, it is very informative, most of which we are already doing but I will take a closer look at his diet and see if it is on record what type of crystals he has.

    I felt a bit upset knowing there is nothing more that can be done for him other than antiflammatory and antibioltcs.

    You have opened a window for me and given me hope.

    Thank you.
     
  4. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    I have known cases where the cat recovered completely and had no more crystals, simply as a result of good dietary changes as well as being given extra fluids daily. No reason why your cat should not be the same.:)
     
  5. sskmick

    sskmick PetForums VIP

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    I never actually thought about it being the crystals, simply because the vet said any crystals/grit would flush straight through.

    His bleeding is round the opening where he is licking. I have to watch that the opening doesn't close up.

    He has never fully recovered from his op. That area seems to be a source of annoyance and discomfort for him.

    Thanks again for your advice.
     
  6. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    Have you discussed this with whoever did his op?
     
  7. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Ah....... well it is possible the source of the problem is the surgery itself, and not crystal formation. Certainly what the vet said is true, i.e deposits should in theory flush straight out of the bladder in the form of grit and not sit around inside the bladder getting larger until they cause a blockage. The purpose, as you know, of PU surgery was to make a wider opening for the bladder to empty through.

    I agree with OS - I would go back and discuss this with the vet who did the op, and if you get no further help, I would seek another opinion from a vet in a different practice.

    If you were to speak to the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons they may be able to give you the name of a vet near you who specialises in PU surgery.
     
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