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My 4 month old kitten, Bonnie has just undergone surgery for a severe knee dislocation on the right leg. The groove in the femur has been deepened and the patella ligament has been fixed to the tibia. Although not severe the same looks like it might happen on the left leg.

A small area has been caged off, with food, water, litter tray and a large blanket to reduce her movement. I am a little concerned she may attempt to climb the cage especially as she comes out of the drowsy state.

Does anyone one have first hand experience or advise they can pass on to ensure she has the best opportunity to make a good recovery.
 

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I think you need to get one of those large plastic dog carriers to restrict movement and not allow her to be able to move about too much. Its many years since I had a kitten with a broken leg, but I remember taking him to bed with me which seemed to settle him much more.
 

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I have a kitten (3.5 month old) who had an operation 3 weeks ago to put a pin in his broken femur. Strict cage rest - I have a medium dog cage with the smallest litter tray I could get, small bed and clip on water bowl. He was quiet for the first week but then the weekend after his op, suddenly decided to climb the bars of the cage as if he did not have a broken leg! I did as the vet advised and covered the inside walls of the cage with cardboard so he didn't have anything to hold on to (only covered the top half of the door side, but he can't get any grip high enough to dangle from).

Then, a week later, he decided he'd had enough of that and leapt up, hanging from the top bars by his claws. So then I had to cover the inside top of the cage with cardboard as well. He is now basically in a large fortified cardboard box! But no more climbing, which is a relief. I also keep the cage in a quiet, warm spare room as when people are there he gets over excited and starts dashing about inside the cage. I feel really mean leaving him in there but each time I tell the vet they are adamant that he is better to be under stimulated and rest the leg. He does come out of the cage for food, and sometimes for a cuddle when he is quiet and not trying to play with everything he sees...
 
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