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Possible Adoption problems/solutions

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by Readergirl7, Jul 10, 2018.


  1. Readergirl7

    Readergirl7 PetForums Newbie

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    I am wondering if adopting my grandparent's dog is possible for me.
    Please read situation below.

    My parents live on a 50 acre orchard with and have a boxer that is about 4 years old. He has had free reign of the property for his whole life, with a shock-collar underground boundary and a dog friend who is owned by another family who they ran the farm with. I live on a small lot in a fairly large city. We have a small flock of chickens and a rabbit, neither of which the dog is used to.
    Is it at all feasible that he could be adopted into our 6 person family as my parents are moving "in to town"? So far he has very limited training, does not walk well on a leash and is not allowed in the house, but is allowed to sleep in the garage. Would a "boot camp" be a good choice, or is it out of the question?
     
  2. kittih

    kittih PetForums VIP

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    Hi and welcome. You might want to post this in dog chat or dog training as more people who can help with your question will see it there.
     
  3. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    What do you mean by a boot camp? Do you mean send him somewhere for intensive 'training'? In which case I would say definitely no, as that would be an awful shock to the dog. Far better that you take time to do the training yourself.

    Can dogs adapt to different living? Yes, of course they can. It may depend on the individual dog of course ( I presume he is socialised) but by taking time to introduce the dog to his new environment and teaching him how to walk on the lead and ensuring he gets lots of free running walks I am sure he can learn that his new home is a good place to be. Dogs can adapt to where they sleep easily enough. Adapting to livestock may be harder but that will depend on the dog and I presume that the chickens and rabbit are fenced in anyway.

    The alternative of course would be to re home the dog.

    J
     
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  4. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    If you have the time and patience to help him adjust to a new environment, yes.

    I’d ditch the shock collar (horrid things :() and create a securely fenced area for him to use, away from the chickens and rabbits, obviously.

    I would never use “boot camp” as a training method as I would very very concerned at the negative effect it could have on the dog with no way of knowing what methods would be used.

    Far better that you (and the family) engage in his training using positive, reward based methods in addition to careful management of his environment.

    Look at Kikopup and positively.com for some tips but finding a good trainer/behaviourist (who uses positive methods) to guide you would be useful.

    My sister has recently taken in a street dog and she has adapted well to living with her other dogs/cats (chickens too in a secure area) and the home environment - small, gentle steps to adjust. She’s never known a “home” before but she has settled well.

    If the boxer has pretty much “ran wild” he will need exercise and mental stimulation to help him adjust so he doesn’t get bored and up to mischief,
     
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  5. ThisIsketts

    ThisIsketts PetForums Newbie

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    I mean sure, but have you asked these questions, will you have time for the dog, be able to take it on walks etc, can you afford vet bills if there's an emergency. If he isn't trained well then that's another thing you have to do, you can find a trainer but you still have to keep at the training. There are doggy boot camps. Place near ours does a 2-week stay with the trainer where you can visit then a month training with you at home. There is also a doggy daycare if you work and don't trust him to be home alone but is he socialised with other dogs, with the chickens and the rabbit, it's introducing him slowly, show its not something to attack but its just there. In the end, it's a question you gotta ask yourself. Can I make the commitment to this dog? If you can go for it. Dogs are amazing. I always never thought I wasn't going to get a dog, was a cat person was brought up around cats, Met my partner who was brought up arround dogs, she wanted a dog it did cause a few arguments. We came across Ridley he had a tough start in life, I will tell you the truth I did hesitate to get him, I was worried about the cost, training him, making sure he got enough exercise, but I said yes for my partner. Now looking back, best decision I made, I get out more because I walk him, meet new people, He is fun and loves to play, I don't mind the clean up when he destroys his toys. I'm healthier and happier. It's entirely your decision only you know if you capable.
     
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  6. Readergirl7

    Readergirl7 PetForums Newbie

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    I am currently doing full-time online school, so I am home most days if not all. I recognize that this dog with need a LOT of training but I'm concerned with what will happen if it doesn't work out as well. I'm assuming he would have to be given to a shelter and I would feel terrible if that happened. I do have the time to walk and train him, although I may need help with the training. In the end, do you think there's any chance he would be happy here in the city growing up on a farm?
     
  7. ThisIsketts

    ThisIsketts PetForums Newbie

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    As long as you have time then yep he should be happy, may take some time for him to adjust to his surroundings. so he may not seem happy at first but that's partly due to the change but dogs do adjust and I'm sure he will see your parents still. You just have to fill his time with other activities, toys and make sure he gets plenty of attention etc. Also, it may not be something that takes a few months it could take a while for him to settle properly. But he will.
     
  8. Readergirl7

    Readergirl7 PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks for your reply!

    any tips for training strategies?
    Is there any hope for a dog "boot camp" or should I train with him with a trainer/alone?
    I am willing to do some training but do not want to sacrifice my other animals during the basic training process.
     
  9. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    Lurcherlad likes this.
  10. Readergirl7

    Readergirl7 PetForums Newbie

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    Sorry about the double post! My mistake!

    If send-away intensive training is a big no-no, should I start the training where he is now or bring him to my house right away?
     
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