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Poor puppy (dog attack)

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Squeeze, Apr 18, 2019.


  1. Squeeze

    Squeeze PetForums VIP

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  2. picaresque

    picaresque Mongrelist

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    Poor pup and family :(
    Ever since getting a small dog I've worried about this sort of thing. I know it's quite rare but it's frightening.
     
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  3. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    It's times like this I realise how lucky Stan was. He was extremely poorly bless him, it's harrowing seeing the picture I took of him at the vets to keep my son updated and that's when he was 'feeling better'
     
  4. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

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    :( Poor pup .
     
  5. DaisyBluebell

    DaisyBluebell Earth, the insane asylum of the Universe

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    Words fail me! RIP little Basil
     
  6. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    Why do people own dogs like that and why on earth would ignore it. You have to assume the dog has done similar before or the owners would not have walked off. It wont help poor Basil but I hope the owners get found and prosecuted.
     
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  7. ttaylor45

    ttaylor45 PetForums Member

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    This happened to me about 6 years ago when I was out walking my two toy poodles fortunately Pepe survived although he had a broken rib and torn abdominal wall which required stitches. We were on a main road and the women with two Rottweiler cross labradors was walking towards me suddenly they dragged her towards me and at first I thought they wanted to say hello to my two but then Pepe started screaming (he was the smaller one in the photo) and I realised he was being attacked. I picked him up and then asked the women for her details so she could pay the vet bill. It was a Saturday afternoon so the bill was over a hundred pounds which she paid. It was only the day after I discovered Pepe had a lump underneath so back to the vets Monday morning were it was diagnosed by X-ray the tear which was stitched and the broken rib which the vet was caused by the other dog biting. I had another bill of 400 or so pounds which the women would not pay. I reported her to the Police where it turned out she had been reported before and was ordered to muzzle both dogs so we took her to court and all she received was a 40 pound fine in which she had a month to pay as she was on Job seeker allowance and a list of restrictions including muzzling. Pepe was lucky that day because he was wearing a coat as it was raining and the vet said that most probably saved him. My other dog Rusty was attacked by a staffy three years later again the dog ran across the road having pulled the lead out of the owners hand . Rusty had 5 stitches in his back and we had a 250 bill which the owner wouldn’t pay and he had the cheek to make out he didn’t live in the area we he clearly did as we saw him several times after. We reported him to the Police but because he was not known to them they weren’t interested. I sadly lost Rusty and Pepe last year due to illness but hope if I get another dog I will not encounter any more horrible dogs on my walks. It’s about time owners were made to be responsible for their dogs attacking others and also I don’t like extending leads being used except perhaps were a dog is walked in a park or somewhere similar.
     
  8. Squeeze

    Squeeze PetForums VIP

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    A friends dog was attacked 3/4 weeks ago, different location but description matches that of the dog and was with two women.
    Both dogs were on lead on this occasion but my friend (who was heavily pregnant at the time) and her gran who was walking with them both ended up on the ground. Thankfully both and the dog had no injuries but again the two women walked off without even check they were ok.

    In this day and age there’s so much advice readily available to help people deal with reactive dogs...
     
  9. Squeeze

    Squeeze PetForums VIP

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    @ttaylor45 - That sounds awful... I also always wonder about the psychological damage attacks have on dogs...
     
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  10. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    So sad and avoidable. Poor little dog. I live on a big estate but rarely walk the dogs through it and tend to head out of town.

    Sox was attacked several times when he was little once by a dog on lead the women couldn't hold onto him. He is now a bit reactive. Loads of people don't use leads it seems to be a status thing.

    I am aware I have two strong male dogs we will be mostly walking separately unless I have help so I know I can control both of them. I don't understand why people take out dogs they have no control over. I can't think of anything more stressful
     
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  11. Squeeze

    Squeeze PetForums VIP

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    I couldn’t possibly comment too much about owning a reactive dog as Jaxon is a submissive as they come...
    But I agree @Boxer123 it must be so stressful... it’s in the dogs, the owners and the general public’s best interest to do something about it...

    I still can’t decided if I’m more angry or sad about the whole situation... Especially as it’s somewhere we go often.
     
  12. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    It can be stressful but there are so many things you can do to manage it. Loads of training ideas and suggestions you can muzzle ect.

    Sox is fear reactive he only reacts if someone really enters his space a jack Russel tried to mount him a few weeks ago and he just froze.

    For this reason to keep his stress levels down I walk him in low dog areas if I see a dog I recall him he goes on a lead and we avoid if we can if not I give him treats as they go past. If I get stuck in a small space I get him in a sit and body block. I don't think he would bite another dog but I'd never risk it.

    I just feel so sad for the family who have lost their little friend.
     
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  13. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    @Boxer123 dogs are reactive for many reasons. Sox may be powerful and I can understand why he may not want a dog to come near, you don't need the stress of a upset dog reacting on a walk to tell another dog to go away. Like you say it's not your fault that Sox reacts because of 'my dog is friendly brigade' which usually means my dog has no social skills, runs up to all and sundry and the dog who then says hey you are being a rude jerk is the one that all owners look at as a devil dog. You do everything you can to protect Sox (and Loki) from the article, this was an unprovoked attack. The owner should never have let their dog get close to the dog...it's ridiculous. A totally different concept.

    As an owner of toy breeds and a huge lump of a sighthound it's actually not in my interest to walk my 3 together. Maisie is brilliant with supervised play at home with Eevee. We monitor calm it down, and don't let it get over aroused. I don't like too much play at home per se although the minibeasts have a wrestle upstairs whilst I go for a bath. On a walk it would be different. Play arouses and can escalate so easily that it can soon go from innocent play to the predatory sequence. Like I say not seen any evidence of this happening but I don't want adrenaline running through her body as it would running with the minibeasts.

    When Stan was attacked it was a complete freak event. I was in the alley at the back of my house and a dog came from no where. Didn't see it come over and just set upon Stan. Stan has been out there a zillion times not running about and stands near the gate. Which he was doing at the time. Never seen the dog since, so am guessing it's one that was visiting or maybe kept inside a lot. Dog warden, police and local rescue centre notified incase someone found it as a stray. No luck. I didn't go to the media as every time in my area someone does with a dog on dog attack they insert a picture of a snarling bull breed/rottie or GSD that doesn't sound like the dog described so I thought there was no point. People don't realise they are library pictures the majority of the time.
     
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  14. DaisyBluebell

    DaisyBluebell Earth, the insane asylum of the Universe

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    I live in dread as soon as the kids are on school holidays - so many times I see young children walking dogs that there is no way they could control should the dog decide to take off which means either the kid being pulled into the road or the lead dropped and their dog allowed to attack - I know exactly what happens the kid says 'I'm bored' & is told oh take the dog for a walk then. Last summer I saw two little girls no more then 10 years old walking 5, yes 5, smallish dogs & I guarantee they did not have a dog bag between them, let alone have the ability to control them !
     
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  15. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    I hope they called the police, if people are allowed to get off with it there will be even more damage done and the police would have taken it very seriously
     
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  16. Boxerluver30

    Boxerluver30 Hound Lover

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    So sad, RIP little pup :(

    I've owned dog reactive/aggressive dogs before and it really isn't difficult to keep them on lead and secure (even muzzled if they are that bad, although obviously with proper conditioning first) to avoid incidents like this. I just think these types of owners really don't consider the impact they have on other dog owners, I've noticed they are usually the type to not give a crap about other humans either so really not surprising!
     
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  17. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    Oh that poor pup, poor family :(

    I don't know that I would call a dog who would quickly grab and kill another dog 'reactive'. That's a bit more than reactive in my book.

    My Bates is a big old jerk of a dog who has very little chill when it comes to rude dogs. He's had his share of altercations in his life but even when he's gotten to the point of using teeth - even on little dogs, he has not done huge damage. He's out to correct other dogs, not really hurt them.
    Once my neighbor's dog got loose and came on to our property and stupidly decided to square up to Bates. I was out there and it didn't really compute in my head what was going on - you know how when you second guess what your eyes see? I saw what looked a lot like the neighbor's dog, but she was on our property, which didn't make sense in my brain, so I was trying to square that in my head and didn't think to tell Bates anything until the fight actually started. Fortunately they both stopped as soon as I yelled at them. Bates is an 80 pound big dog, neighbor's dog is a very little terrier, westie sized. She had a good puncture wound in the meat of her back thigh, and lots of slobber all over her. That's all. This is the same dog who has killed small animals the same size or larger than my neighbor's dog with one bite.
    (BTW, I took the neighbor's dog home, told them what happened, offered to pay vet bills and they wouldn't hear of it as they considered it their mistake for letting her get loose. I did still make her a "get well" package with treats, some wound care stuff, and a card. Yay for good neighborly relations and understanding dog owners.)

    Dogs absolutely know what they're doing with their mouths, even in the heat of a fight. Bates and Lunar (140 pound great dane) got in to a spectacular fight when we first got Lunar, and I stupidly got in the middle of it. My only injury was a scratched top of my foot where one of them stepped on it and dug in with his claws. They were actively poking holes in each other and still managed not to land a single bite on me even though at one point I had Lunar in a bear hug trying to restrain him while screaming at Bates to back off (which he thankfully did). I am NOT recommending this tactic, it was very stupid of me, but at the same time, I feel we just don't give dogs enough credit for the amazing control and awareness they have over their mouths. And in turn, how when aberrant behavior does show, that we should see it for how out of the norm it is.

    Here's the thing. A dog who kills another dog with one bite damn well knows what he's doing. And if he doesn't know what he's doing, is even more scary because what else do they not know they're doing? (With the exception of predatory drift, but I'm not going to muddy the waters here with that, and I've waffled back and forth over that one a lot over the years anyway.)

    We have got to do a better job of educating the public (and understanding ourselves) what is within the parameters of 'normal' when it comes to aggressive dog behavior. Poking holes in a rude dog? Meh... pretty normal in the greater scheme of things. Not reason to label the dog dangerous or a killer or whatever.
    Killing small furries? The neighbor's cat? Again, pretty normal for a lot of breeds, not something to allow of course, but nothing that would make me consider the dog necessarily unsound.
    Killing another dog? Sorry, that's not okay. Not normal.

    We have also got to do a better job understanding and educating on bite inhibition and control. Just as a human can use their hands for the most delicate and precise work, humans can also make a fist and land a really damaging punch. Dogs' mouths are like human hands. Bates crushes chicken bones with one crunch, virtually no effort, yet when he had my neighbor's little terrier in his mouth all he left was one puncture wound.
    Same when Holly the resource guarding lab bit Cesar Millan, she just poked a few holes in his hand. She could have crushed it, but she didn't, even though she was scared, stressed, and pushed completely to her limit.
    Dogs are more than capable of controlling not just how hard they bite, but what teeth they use to bite with. This is not random or haphazard, they're purposefully choosing which part of their mouth to use to bite with.

    So when I hear about a dog killing another dog, regardless of the size difference, I think to myself that something here is not quite right. Maybe it was a completely unlucky bite, yes, that happens. Maybe it was a total accident, the mastiff play bowed and broke the mini dachshund's back with a paw. But a chomp and kill of another dog just doesn't sit right with me. Even dogs bred to defend against predators don't go for a killing bite to start with. It's just doesn't sit right with me that a dog would so easily kill another dog :(

    Not just because the owners walked off, but if the dog is that good at grabbing and killing small dogs, you have to think he has had opportunity to practice the behavior - I'm not saying the owners have encouraged it, but that it has happened before, hasn't been stopped and the dog keeps getting 'better' at it :(
     
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  18. Bluemoon7

    Bluemoon7 PetForums Newbie

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    One of mine was badly attacked on a beach on Christmas Day when we were on holiday in Cornwall. Little Ossie (Springer 8 months old at the time) was ragged twice by a German Shepherd after it pulled itself away from the woman who had hold of it. The beach was packed and this thing ran around loads of people before coming through a group and grabbing Ossie. I managed to pull it off but it ran away and then came back and attacked him again as I was holding him. The partner of the woman and their two adult sons thought it was hilarious. When I confronted them he told me to “piss off as I was spoiling their Christmas”. . I almost lost the plot totally. Called the police but as it was Christmas Day the nearest officer was almost 20 miles away. The police asked to speak to the fella who had told me to “piss off” on my phone but the family just walked away. They were very posh and clearly local. We were all upset. My partner was in tears, my other dog was shaken and upset and Ossie was physically hurt and hyperventilating.

    We spent a couple of hours at the emergency vet on Christmas Day. They thought Ossie’s bladder had been ruptured. It was horrible and although fully recovered physically he lost all his confidence and has never been the confident stubborn little fella that he was before being attacked. I have done loads of work with him since Christmas but he is still very clingy to me, will scare easily and is worried about other dogs. My other dog Clyde gets quite defensive now when other dogs approach Ossie and is a little protective. It has affected both of them to varying degrees.

    Little Ossie is a beautiful little fella but he has definitely been sad since this happened.
    296B810F-2863-45EB-83D1-D206E2609E23.jpeg
    6782B522-E19E-4C7D-A0E6-32F24B64FD0B.jpeg
     
  19. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    Oh Ossie your beautiful I hope you feel better soon. I don't understand how people can not be mortified and apologise immediately. How awful.
     
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  20. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    Saw this the other day and wondered how on earth the owners just walked off without a word! They obviously don't give a sh!t. If my dog attacked another dog (and Fly has) I would be in there trying my best to get him off and apologising profusely!
    As @O2.0 says dogs generally have a good idea how much pressure they are putting on and what damage they are planning on doing. Fly (lurcher) has grabbed our tenant's little JRT before and not left a mark (the JRT had come under the gate into our garden at precisely the time I'd let Fly out for his morning wee - about 6.55am! - that was NOT a fun morning!). Just a lot of slobber (although I got some nice teeth marks on my hands from both dogs!)
    @Squeeze if they walk in that area often then someone will surely recognise them and report them. Poor little dog.
     
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