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Please recommend me a dog breed <3

Discussion in 'Dog Breeding' started by indigoblues, Mar 6, 2017.


  1. indigoblues

    indigoblues PetForums Newbie

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    Hello!

    In about a year and a half I will be moving out of my parent's house and into a 3 bedroom apartment with a small yard (fenced). I will be 17/18 and my roommates will be 17 and 20 there won't be any small children/other animals except for a mid sized dog. I live in Vancouver Canada where the weather is fairly seasonal, doesn't usually get too cold/too hot. We will be living right by a dog park, an off leash dog beach and Stanley Park (a large park). The dog would be alone MAX 24 hours a week broken down into 4 hours a day to 8 hours a day, but probably less because my room mates have different work schedules than me. No one will be attending any form of schooling for a year/2 years. Eventually, I will be attending veterinary school but will be studying part time.

    I've owned a dog before, a whippet/retriever "desi dog" that had an aggressive/timid temperament because she was rescued from a harsh life. I had to do a lot of training/research to make sure her aggressive temperament was handled properly so I would say that I have some skill in dog training.

    I'm definitely invested in putting a lot of effort/time into exercising the dog. I would also like to do agility training and maybe future showings with the dog.

    I prefer mid to large sized dogs, but am willing to consider a smaller dog (nothing like a chihuahua though!). I wish for the dog to be fairly friendly (so I could take it to the dog park) and preferably with a low wandering impulse so I can let it off leash during long hikes and such. I am perfectly okay with having to groom the dog often. Although I would like the dog to be friendly, I would also like a semi guard dog.

    - Will consider getting an adult dog however would prefer not to adopt one from a shelter because it's hard to tell what you're getting
    - If I do get a puppy I will be taking some time off to make sure it is properly potty trained and since I work nearby where I will be living, I will be able to easily check up on the puppy every hour or so
    - I will be able to give the dog 1.5-3 hours a day of exercise, sometimes more, if I decide to go for a hike on a day off or something. These outings are things I already do, without the company of a dog.

    Dog breeds i've considered:

    - Doberman Pinscher. Love the intelligence and have met many loveable dobermans, I have been told they are smart enough to determine whether a person in breaking and entering or just visiting. However have heard that to get a puppy you need a large yard. (I have seen many dobermans downtown though. Where it is near impossible to get more than a mid sized yard)

    - Norwegian Elkhound. Recommended by a friend who has 2 of them. I love the breed, seems very trainable and i've spoken to a reputable breeder who seems to think it would work out with my lifestyle. Haven't done much research on them though.

    - Shiba Inu. Always loved the look of the dog and have a friend who has the most loveable Shiba there is. However i've been told they're very temperamental and require a lot of patience.

    - Border Collie. Perhaps my dream dog. Love the intelligence and the emotional aspect of this breed. But have been told it is near impossible to have one without a large yard/lots of time.

    - Mastiff. Love the "gentle giant" aspect of the dog. Heard they were laid back but also had health problems? Also heard they were hard to train.

    - Lab/Golden. Lots of people have recommended me these dogs. Very friendly and seemingly very popular. However they lack the "guard dog" aspect that I would like to have.

    Feel free to recommend other dogs that I haven't listed.
     
  2. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    English Shepherd would be good. Less intense and calmer than a BC, similar in looks, better 'off' switch and very trainable. Same goes for Australian Shepherd. Both breeds also do well as agility dogs.
     
  3. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    My advice would be wait a few years tbh.

    Your life is going to be going through some major changes and I know at that age I wouldn't have wanted the responsibility of a dog. Time to be whooping it up and enjoying your new found freedom! ;)

    Also no way of really knowing how your roommates will cope with a dog in the house, especially if and when things don't run smoothly.

    Maybe volunteer at some local rescues to get your dog fix without the responsibility?
     
  4. Katalyst

    Katalyst A Lanky Lurcher and a Delinquent Dobermann

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    I agree with Lurcherlad however if you REALLY want to make it work... you could. But it'll be work. Lots of it.
    And honestly, of your list I highly recommend a well bred labrador or golden.
    One of my dogs is a dobermann and I can hand on heart say that they're not a breed for the faint of heart or uninitiated. She's got the most beautiful temperament but as with most dobies, she's a velcro dog. She struggles without me and although she is improving, it's a vast amount of continuous work.
    She is also very funny with other dogs, stubborn, head strong, infuriating and manipulative. Her prey drive is INSANE.
    Other than that... she's perfect lol.

    Shiba inu are also HARD work. They're not easy to train, very independent and stubborn.

    Mastiffs i have only limited experience with and although they're wonderful dogs, pretty easy going and happy to chill for most of the day I find them to be a little.... slow. As in... not quick to learn, a bit stubborn. I appreciate that's a horrible generalisation but that's my own limited experience with mastiffs.

    Elkhounds... I spent much of my younger life around one as a close family friend had a bitch. Easy going, good with other dogs, terrible to recall (despite what she seemed to think, the lady was an awful trainer), stubborn and very, very loud. Still a breed I'd consider.

    Border collie... very intelligent, incredibly quick of mind and easy to train BUT very high energy, very demanding and if you don't keep them busy, they'll keep themselves busy... probably by doing something terribly destructive!
    Research the line of your puppy as (and I can't speak for Canada, only uk) there are lines with temperament issues that will need avoiding.

    Personally, I'd wait. Consider what happens if your housemates need to or what to move out and you need to find somewhere else to live. Consider how much time your vet course will take (I know it's only part time but expect to spend most of the rest of your free time studying and writing essays).

    What ever you chose to do, good luck.
     
  5. applecrumlin

    applecrumlin Oh Help Oh No it's a Gruffalo

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    Sorry I don't have much to offer,except :
    1. There is a very funny video on YouTube of a mastiff doing agility. Member Sairy posted it here recently, or just Google it.
    2. My first dog was a collie type. She was an absolute dream, but I think the chances of getting another one like her are so slim that I didn't take a chance on getting another. I think you are wise to be very very careful in considering a BC.
    3. I understand your reservations around getting a rescue dog, but if you will be training as a vet, the chances are that you will come across a LOT of dogs. Firstly you will get a lot of experience in judging temperaments and secondly I think you would find it rewarding to give a dog a second chance. Buying a puppy is a minefield - so many members on here have done research and bought from what they thought was a respected breeder, and only realised later that they had been naive.
    4. One factor that no-one ever seems to ask about is a breed's potential for mixing with other dogs. My first was completely dog-neutral, yet another thing that I took for granted about her at the time. She liked the other dogs she lived with, and was friendly towards others who approached her, but she didn't seek them out. Off lead walks were very relaxed. My current dog was like a dog-seeking missile, whilst ignoring any people that she doesn't already know.
    At first I enjoyed her mad zoomies with other dogs but she is taking a long time to outgrow that and it means I'm always scanning for other dogs when we're out - she is friendly, but can be seen as a rude nuisance.
    5. Member kamikaze has an Australian Shepherd, I understand that she bought him at a similar age to you. It might be worth hooking up with her to get her perspective on things to consider.

    This has ended up far longer than I expected! Good luck, but really, research, research, research!

    Edited to add, I hope this isn't against forum etiquette, but I suggest you look out for posts by Ouesi. She has given hugely useful advice on here about what to look for when buying a pup, and also has a lot of experience in rescue. She's in the US, so may be a little more familiar with Canadian practice, than most of the UK members here.
     
    #5 applecrumlin, Mar 7, 2017
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2017
    Katalyst likes this.
  6. indigoblues

    indigoblues PetForums Newbie

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    Both my roommates are aware of the dog (they both happen to be very close friends of mine) and they both are prepared to help me with walking, training etc. I doubt anyone will be moving because the flat we got into is a co op that's close to everything and is spacious but also has a very very low rent cost. However if it does come to that, I would probably move back in with my parents temporarily and they would be fine with having a dog in the house. An added bonus is a good friend of mine owns a doggy day care nearby the University I will be studying at. Very spacious and all the people who work there are true dog lovers, not just employees who want to make ends meat. However I definitely agree, I may wait until the summer after I have attended my first year to get a taste of what it's lIke and then id be able to see how much time I'd really have. Thank you so so much for all your information though! I feel like I've been misinformed about dobermans as the breeder I spoke to (whom many recommended me to) told me they were easy going and easy to train. I think my top 3s are the lab, elkhound and mastiff. Again, thank you so much for all your help :)
     
    Katalyst likes this.
  7. indigoblues

    indigoblues PetForums Newbie

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    I have been reconsidering adopting actually! However most of the dogs in shelters nearby me are either border collies or pitbulls, with the exception of some smaller dogs. My experience with adopting is that I got a puppy from a lady who brought them over from India, she claimed they were their own breed and called them "desi dogs" I suspect my puppy was some sort of whippet/german shepherd cross. She was a very trainable dog, very intelligent and eager to please. She often slept in until the afternoon so early morning pee breaks weren't a problem. However she was terribly aggressive towards other dogs and often got skittish if there was a small gust of wind. The aggression was pretty bad for a while and no matter how many walks or how much money we put down to try and take her to obedience classes, she just wouldn't rest. I feel like it's easier to know what you're getting with pure breeds but if the right puppy comes along I'd definitely love to give it a go. Thank you for all your information though! I will definitely be checking out the mastiff video :)
     
  8. Katalyst

    Katalyst A Lanky Lurcher and a Delinquent Dobermann

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    Maybe her line of Dobes is indeed easy going but that's not a typical dobermann trait really :/
    I've been lucky enough to spend time around quote a lot of Dobes and whilst some are more laid back than others (and they do certainly know how to chill once they're mature!) none of them have been what I'd describe as laid back dogs tbh.
    But then you're not in the UK so I guess it's entirely possible that hers are indeed really chill.
     
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