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Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Philx83, Oct 18, 2019.


  1. Philx83

    Philx83 PetForums Newbie

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    I really hope someone can help. I have a two year old cockapoo and two months ago he had a fit. Basically he had one fit that lasted maybe a minute or so, then as we were sitting in the vets he had another one. They kept him in overnight and did tests but couldn’t find anything and said keep an eye on him - they didn’t seem too concerned (even though I was absolutely beside myself).

    We had hoped it was a one off but then it happened again last night. This time there was less panic from me and I did what they told me to do, just kind of stroked him and tried to be with him.

    He really is like my family and we’re devestated to see him have these fits and are so worried. Obviously if we go back to the vets there is going to be a huge cost to do more deeper tests and to be honest we will be struggling to pay (although we will do it).

    it seems such an awful, scary thing to have a fit but some stuff I’ve read says it’s not too bad for them in a way, looks worse than it is.

    can anyone give me any advice on what the hell can cause this, what to do, should I be worried, will he die from it, is he in pain, how we should handle it, do we go back to vets etc etc etc.

    Any help would be appreciated as we’re so worried and upset.
     
  2. Beth78

    Beth78 PetForums VIP

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    I would take him back to the vets, is he insured?
    It could be something that can be sorted.
    I don't think it's worth taking the risk of waiting.
     
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  3. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    It's very scary when your dog first has a fit so you have my sympathy. Generally what I found with our fitting Beagle is that the Vets do have a 'let's see how it goes' approach and only generally move on to further tests if there is a concern that there are other symptoms that may need looking in to (we were told to look out for problems walking, loss of condition, lack of appetite, lethergy or obvious signs of pain etc). In the case of the Beagle (which actually belongs to a friend but had the first major fit whilst staying with us!) there was no need for further tests. Since the fit with us (nearlly three years ago now) this little dog has had I think four further seizures - all manageable by calming waiting beside the dog until they return to themselves and then letting them rest. It's not generally life threatening (or painful) and in my experience Vets don't medicate unless it impairs quality of life. Epilepsy in dogs is not uncommon and just as in humans there is not a 'cause'.

    Of course if you feel your dog is poorly in other ways or does show signs of not being themselves or not wanting to join in with life then of course talk to your vet and go for further tests.

    J
     
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  4. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    Some border collie/working sheepdog lines are distinctly prone to epilepsy, so there is probably a genetic element to it.
     
  5. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    Absolutely, just as there is in humans. Most common form. Although it's still called idiopathic which denotes they don't actually know the cause.

    J
     
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