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Please help me

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Sophielou88, Jul 19, 2017.


  1. Sophielou88

    Sophielou88 PetForums Newbie

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    Hi,
    I am in desperate need of some advice/help.
    I have a staff cross which I've had since 2008, a rescue from RSPCA. Never really been clear on his age, but vet thinks now approx 11/12.
    He's always been a high maintenance pooch, but love him more than I can explain.
    He's always been anxious and doesn't like to be left. Lucky for him I work nights and husband days so he's very rarely left, if I need to go to shops etc.
    Over the last year he has started doing wee's and poo's in the house. The vet put it down to separation anxiety (we've now tried dog training, thunder coats, crate training, and lastly resorting to meds). Nothing has helped and the problem has got so much worse. The vet now things it's possibly a tumour of some sort to brain or dementia. But says she wouldn't be happy to put him under for a scan due to his age etc and it wouldn't help make him better.
    I wake up to wee and poo every day, even though me and my other half set alarms to take him out for a wee in night. It's almost as if he doesn't know what he's doing. He's not drinking hardly at all (days at a time) and has stopped really listening to commands (or not understanding) he is eating fine, his poo is so dry and crumbly (dehydration?). He basically jus looks miserable and totally fed up. He also sneezes loads (?? Relevant??).
    This dog is my world and the vet has basically said she thinks it's time to let him go because of his quality of life is so rubbish.
    I am at my wits end, I would do or try anything. I just don't think I can be responsible for making this kind of choice.
    Any advice would be so so much appreciated
    Sorry for long post and thank you for reading. X
     
  2. Mirandashell

    Mirandashell Banned

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    Oh sweetheart.... I really feel for you cos this is a horrible situation. You are going to hate what I'm about to say but I have to say it. You are responsible for making the decision to PTS. Your dog can't do it. It's the last loving thing you can do for him. There just comes a time in an old dog's life when you have to let him go. And if your vet is saying to you that it's time.... then it's most likely time. And the best way for him to go is falling asleep in your arms after the vet gives him the injection.
     
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  3. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    I don't think it is fair on the dog to continue like this as it does sound as if he is suffering.

    What tests have been done so far? Why does your vet think it is a tumor? If you are not happy with her diagnosis then see another but do this sooner rather than later
     
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  4. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    It does sound like his quality of life is so low that it might be time to let him go, sadly :(

    It is the hardest decision to have to make, but ultimately the kindest. My mum wanted to be pts when she was diagnosed with an aggressive and inoperable brain tumour - sadly, we weren't able to fulfil her wish without becoming criminals (though "luckily" she died quickly from a complication from an unrelated condition :().

    If you could ask your beloved dog, what do you think would be the answer?

    Honestly, in my experience, the animal knows very little about what is going to happen when pts humanely. My vet usually gives a sedative whilst I hold them as they fall asleep (no different really to having a GA) which allows me to say goodbye, and then takes them through to the back to complete the process. They have always been extremely understanding and treated the animal and me with the utmost kindness and understanding.

    They also offer a service for dealing with your pet afterwards if taking them home is not an option (though I recommend it if there are other pets in the house, so they can understand what has happened).

    Dying of natural causes rarely involves passing away peacefully in their sleep, sadly.
     
  5. Sophielou88

    Sophielou88 PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you all for taking the time to reply.
    He is my first dog, and been there through it all with me, graduating from uni, moving into my first home, my children, moving to our 'forever home' I cannot imagine my life without him being there.
    I know he is unhappy and lost his 'spark'.
    I'm just scared incase it's the wrong choice to pts what if it's a mistake, if it's not his time? I've never been through this before and I really don't know what I'm meant to do/think. I feel like if I pts I'm a murderer, and I can't stand the thought of my boy looking at me while I'm ending his life. It's killing me x
     
  6. Sophielou88

    Sophielou88 PetForums Newbie

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    he is 'healthy' in all other aspects of life.
    Vet first of all thought separation anxiety but said after all I've done so far to stop symptoms something would have improved but it's getting worse.
    Symptoms are;
    Inappropriate elimination (although think this is actually incontinence/unawareness
    Not drinking
    Pacing all day
    Loss of interest in playing/walks
    Loss of obedience to commands
    When I take him to his part of the garden for a wee, he just paces around not knowing what to do.
    Shaking/tremors (although had shaking for a while just gotten worse)
     
  7. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Has your vet mentioned Canine cognitive Dysfunction at all?

    Tbh, it sounds like he is going senile.
     
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  8. Sophielou88

    Sophielou88 PetForums Newbie

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    She said about 'doggie dementia' which I'm presuming is the same thing?
     
  9. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    You love the dog, and it's hard to let go. But you say he's unhappy. Do you want him to continue being unhappy? The kind thing is to let him find peace. Nothing you or the vets can do will turn him back into the young, happy dog he used to be.
    I went through this a few weeks ago with my old dog. It hurt, but I know it was the right thing to do for her, and it was very quick and peaceful.
     
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  10. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Yes.

    My previous dog developed CCD. Tbh, it was like living with a dog that wasnt mine by the end; everything that made Alfie, Alfie, was gone. I tried all these meds and supplements but im not entirely convinced they work.

    In hindsight, i wish i had had my boy PTS a good 6-8 months before i actually did. Sadly, i convinced myself that as he wasnt in pain, and wasnt 'suffering' then i was justified in keeping him going.

    All he was doing though was going through the motions. There was no happiness, no joy, no spark. He simply existed.

    Personally, i will never prolong the life of a senile dog again.

    My dog was 16, almost 17 though. And a Staffy.

    At 11/12 i would possibly do some investigations first. Its not THAT old for some breeds.
     
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  11. Sophielou88

    Sophielou88 PetForums Newbie

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    You've hit the nail on the head when you said everything that made your dog who he was had gone. He isn't my Mali anymore. He simply exists. He's lost his cheeky spark.
     
  12. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    At lot of what you describe sounds like cognitive dysfunction basically like older people older dogs can get loss of optimum brain function and it does cause symptoms like these, loss of toilet training, not so responsive to owners and commands, some will be come withdrawn others may become clingy and not do so well when left, wanting to go out in the garden and then standing and looking like they don't know what they are doing or how they got there is classic, so is general confusion and sometimes barking or staring at seemingly nothing. They often tend to pace and get agitated but often its more usual to sleep longer and sounder in the day and be pacing and up at night.

    Pain often seems to get worse at night and at his age he could well have some arthritic changes, has the vet given him an orthopaedic exam to check there isn't any pain response in any areas? Sometimes pain isn't that apparent until you do a proper ortho exam with extensions and manipulations. If he is in pain that could be contributing to the restlessness and agitation even and sometimes they shake with pain or stress too.

    Its difficult because there could be more going on and without tests its impossible to know if some of the things or at least contributing could be medical and what could be cognitive dysfunction. Have they done any basic tests like general health profile blood tests and urine tests. In older age dogs can lose an amount of kidney and liver dysfunction and things like liver issues can also affect behaviour and even cause seizures too. Urine and blood tests are not particularly invasive and can tell a lot about general health.

    If it is cognitive dysfunction particularly if not too far advanced there are things that can help a lot of dogs, Members have had good results with something called Aktivait there is also something called senilife there is also veterinary only medications like vivitonin and selegiline, so there are things out there to help with CDS.

    Obviously we cant see exactly what he is doing, how bad the symptoms are and what his quality of life is, all we can suggest is things that may be worth checking or things that might help. Its really only something that you can discuss with your vet more and decide.

    As another thought I'm assuming the vets have checked his hearing and sight to make sure there isn't a loss of either too, as that can affect behaviour or add to problems.
     
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  13. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Its horrible. It really is.

    Its not just hard for the dog, but hard for us too. I didnt realise until i had Alfie PTS, just how stressed and miserable i was.

    When i went i felt such relief and it was a good few months before i ever felt like i missed him. I guess because what made him, him, had actually long gone and i had for all intents and purposes, grieved for him.

    Its a tough one, as its so easy to concentrate on physical suffering, and ignore whats going on mentally with an animal.
     
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  14. Sophielou88

    Sophielou88 PetForums Newbie

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    You totally 100% get it x
     
  15. Sophielou88

    Sophielou88 PetForums Newbie

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    Hearing, sight all appears fine according to vet. And I don't feel his sight or hearing are affected if I'm honest.
    Had bloods and urine tested, all okay.
    After exam by vet she doesn't think he seems to be in any pain.
     
  16. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    If the tests he has had done are clear, then it could possibly be that it is cognitive dysfunction aka doggie demetia, only suggestion would be discuss the things that are available and has helped some dogs and see if they think it would be worth a trial of something like that. As said though only yourself and your vet can actually see him and his current quality of life and decide if you think it would be worth trying.
     
  17. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    Sometime you just have to make that decision though as difficult as it is. I had to do this in January with my Toby, he was my first dog & it broke my heart. He was diagnosed with an inoperable tumor & I made the decision to have him pts that evening. I could have had a couple of weeks with him but I chose not to as I didn't want to see him deteriorate.... afterwards I had many stages of guilt ... did I do it too soon...... should I have gotten a second opinion..... did I miss any signs .... :(

    Now I am can think more rationally & I am glad I chose to do it sooner rather than later. He was nearly 14yrs old & we had had such a great time together& unfortunately death of our pets is something we have to accept is going to happen although it doesn't make it easier. Not a day goes by when I don't miss Toby but it's not always sad, I do remember all the fun days we had but it is still difficult
     
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