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Pet trim for long haired dogs

Discussion in 'Dog Grooming' started by shazalhasa, May 10, 2010.


  1. shazalhasa

    shazalhasa PetForums VIP

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    This is something I haven't done for a while now that I've started showing my fur babies but I have done it and hopefully my head won't grow too big but I do think that I did a better job than the groomers I've used in the past :p

    You don't need to have the most expensive pet clippers... I don't ! All I have is a clipper set from Wahl with a load of attachments which only cost around £25 from argos.

    The first time I sent my Benji to a groomer, I was horrified when he came back with a big bald patch that was grazed on his neck... right where his collar sits and bleeding toe nails because they'd been cut too short... curse those black nails ! That was when I decided that the next time he was trimmed, I was going to do it myself :confused: god help him lol

    It really wasn't as bad as I thought it was going to be, I simply put the longest attachment on the clippers and started going in the direction of growth from his head (leaving his ears and face), right down his neck, then from the middle of his back down his body and legs. I found the legs a real worry as I was scared of catching the thin skin in his armpits and down the backs of his back legs but I kept going along the direction of growth and it was fine. When that was all done, I brushed his coat up to show any long bits, if it was really bad and uneven, then I'd run the clippers over him again, this time going against the growth so working upwards from his feet. Benji has dew claws on all four feet so I started just above them. The last thing I did with the clippers is his ears. I layed it across my hand nice and flat, then ran the clippers in direction of hair growth and then finished off with a scissors to get the shape. I kept my fingers on the edges of his ears to be sure of no accidents.

    When I was happy with his head, ears and body hair, I would then do his face with a small pair of scissors with rounded ends. I like them to be a bit fluffy so I tried to keep the hair about 1.5 - 2 inches long with just enough to give him a cute puppy look.

    The last thing I did was his feet, he's got incredibly ticklish feet so this was the hardest part for me. Everytime I put the comb or scissors near his feet, he was pulling away and rolling over as if it was playtime. I managed to get them looking nice and neat using just the small rounded scissors.
    The first photo attached was the first time I clipped him myself, where I actually managed to do his feet.

    The second time I clipped him, he was refusing point blank to let me do his feet and kept running away, I even tried to sneak a trim when he was fast asleep but he woke up and ran off lol... not so funny when you see in the 2nd attachment of how he looked when I took him to a different groomer and asked for just his feet to be tidied up... I was horrified :scared:

    The last time I did a pet trim was when our Coco was expecting. She was in full coat and while we were considering keeping her in coat whilst nursing, felt it would be cruel to have to keep grooming her... she should be enjoying her babies... so out came the clippers again. She hated it, as soon as the buzzing clippers went near her she started to shake like a leaf and in her condition there was no way I was going to upset her so they were put away and instead I used the scissors on her. I combed her hair out and snipped away until she was fairly tidy all over. It took over 2 hours to complete but she did look cute.
     

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    Clare7435 likes this.
  2. dawnie24

    dawnie24 PetForums Junior

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    hi im a groomer just read what you wrote,when the groomer cut your dogs nails its very hard to judge how short to go and if the nails are bleeding it doesnt matter as it is actually good,not that you would cut them on purpose.Heres a few hints, when shaving under the arm pits never use an attachment thats why it tugs on the hair always use a number 10,baring in mind im goin buy the oster clippers,ive used a wahl and hated it you cant get a perfect cut with them thats why they are cheap.If you have any questions please feel free to ask.xx
     
  3. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    In what way is it good?

    Its extremely painful, and opens the nail up to infection. Nail bed infections can be extremely serious. Sometimes resulting in bone infections and amputation. I speak from experience on this front.

    The only time a dogs nails should be cut until they are bleeding is when a dog is under aneasthetic, and the bleeding dealt with and sealed sufficiently.

    If a groomer or vet/nurse cut my dogs nails too short i would be livid. Long nails should be dealt with by cutting on a regular basis so that the nerves and blood vessels retract gradually and naturally.
     
  4. dexter

    dexter PetForums VIP

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    bloody hell i wouldn't want u cutting my dogs nails...............
     
  5. deb53

    deb53 PetForums VIP

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    Gosh I have just read this and am gob-smacked. How is it "good" to cut through a blood vessel and a nerve?? :eek: :eek:

    Not only putting through the dog pain but also putting off nail clipping for hte rest of its life!!

    Errrrr how would you like someone to cut through a live nerve with a pair of guillotine clippers!!

    Sorry but if you think that it "good" to do you should not be working with animals.:mad:
     
  6. Clare7435

    Clare7435 PetForums VIP

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    My god I'm so glad I don't take Penny to a groomer.
    Dissagree with the comment on the Wahl clippers though, I bought them ones and they're fantastic, I cut 3 peoples dogs now and they all love the way I've done it, and I find them easy to use....AND I learnt most things from the OP :thumbup:
     
  7. Clare7435

    Clare7435 PetForums VIP

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    Here ya go folks......Penny trimmed with Whal clippers...and I learnt how thanks to good ole SHazalhasa :thumbup: her face was almost at the floor before I did it lol

    [​IMG]
     
  8. dawnie24

    dawnie24 PetForums Junior

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    i didnt mean its good,i meant if your a groomer and you cut through a nerve your not going to panick like made you use the special powder to stop the bleeding and all is ok,and yes if it does bleed its not always a bad thing,ive been with dogs since i was 14 and groomed for 7 years,i think your a bit ott saying if you cut through a nerve it can lead to amputation,if that was the case i wouldnt go near a dogs nails,i can onasly say ive only had a dog bleed on me twice,but ive seen it happen more.You people dont read things properly,and saying your shocked at what you read,ha im not that bad love,if i was i wouldnt be working with animals,so get it right before you judge someone.
     
  9. dawnie24

    dawnie24 PetForums Junior

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    yes wahl will be ok for a while but the ones i had wore down very quick,i used to clip peoples dogs in a boarding kennels useing them,and useing the oster i can see the difference.thats what i meant.
     
  10. dawnie24

    dawnie24 PetForums Junior

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    read what i wrote properly love.Ru a groomer?if not how would you know?and i wouldnt cut through a nerve on perpose,you disscust me for writing what you wrote,get your facts right first.!!!!!!
     
  11. dawnie24

    dawnie24 PetForums Junior

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    With an attitude like yours i wouldnt want you anywere near mine.
     
  12. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Actually i was a veterinary nurse, so know a fair bit about nail trimming and what should or shouldnt be done.

    Of course accidents do happen, but it was your "if the nails are bleeding it doesnt matter as it is actually good" that i think most people are shocked by.

    Its not good, not ever. It has no benefit to the animal, is painful as it means nerve endings have been severed, and leave the nail open to infection.

    Not only that, but it can cause problems when it comes to trimming the nails in future, as the dog can quickly associate trimming, with pain.

    The amount of dogs that end up having to be knocked out to have their nails trimmed is shocking and preventable.
     
  13. fluffybunny2001

    fluffybunny2001 PetForums VIP

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    completeley agree!!!!
     
  14. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    When i first rescued Oscar his nails had been completely cut off.

    Took me about 3 years until i could trim them with him muzzled but not going ballistic, and about another 3 until i was able to take the muzzle off completely and not be in fear of being bitten.

    Its the only thing he has ever shown aggression over and i really dont blame him.

    I find it upsetting that a dog has to be sedated for something as simple as a nail trim. More people need to desensitise their dogs at a young age to have their feet touched and manipulated. And more people need to take care when trimming. Always best to leave them a little long, than take them too short.
     
  15. deb53

    deb53 PetForums VIP

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    O I read your post perfectly and still stand by what I said. Am a groomer???? No i'm not, yes I groom my dogs and care for their nails without causing pain but no I'm not a professional groomer.

    How would I know???? I have been a veterinary nurse and cared for dogs probably from before you were a twinkle in your fathers eye and that combined with common sense would tell you that anyone who says its "good" to cut through a nerve and cause pain to a dog is in the wrong profession.

    As to the fact I "disscust" you I take it you mean disgust?? Well I can ensure you that your beliefs disgust me and I wonder how your clients owners would feel to hear your statement.

    Ending with all the exclamation marks is an insult to my intelligence so "love" just think twice when you become trigger happy with your guillotine that maybe the pain you inflict on the dogs left in your care will turn around and maybe you will cut through a nerve and I wonder if that will feel "good" to you!!
     
  16. dawnie24

    dawnie24 PetForums Junior

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    You lead a sad life if all you can do is take the piss out of peoples spellings and go over board on the fact that i said if you cut a dogs nails by mistake its not the end of the world.I may be 24 but i have also worked in a vets,my trainer explained to me about nails i know the ins and outs,and all the groomers i know say the same if a dogs nails bleed by mistake,dont forget to read that bit,it flushes out any dirt etc.So dont messege me anymore or i will take further action.Ive come on here to give my own advice,as i am a careing person i groom cats and dogs i own rats and i also help people with there horses etc.The last thing i need is someone like you going ott and just looking for a fight.Theres alot of bad groomers out there thats why i go to peoples homes so they can stay with there dog and watch me groom nobody has complained and i dont make there nails bleed.!!!
     
  17. deb53

    deb53 PetForums VIP

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    Sad maybe but caring yes.

    Flushes the dirt out?? OMG I have heard it all now! Hun that is a vein you are cutting through not a damm hose pipe.

    Maybe you should read up on a book of anatomy.

    In regards to messaging you.......this is an open forum that I am writing on, a thread opened by another member......not once have I private messaged you and most certainly don't intend to.
     
    #17 deb53, Jun 7, 2010
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2010
  18. shazalhasa

    shazalhasa PetForums VIP

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    WOW :scared: it's all happening in here !!

    I did this post because someone had asked if I had any advice on the subject and all I've done is write about the experience I've had with my own. It wasn't intended to be professional level, it was a pet owner managing to trim a long coated dog using what was available hence the wahl human hair clippers being used :rolleyes:

    With regards to the toenails bleeding, I can't for the life of me see how this can be a good thing :confused: When my Benji came back from the groomers, his nails were bleeding quite a lot and I daresay it was painful for him as since then he's been a nightmare when it comes to clipping them, forever pulling his feet out of my hand and rolling over into really strange positions to avoid having it done.

    Consider this, if you snagged a fingernail or toenail and ripped it in a way that made it bleed, does it hurt you ? I know it hurts me :( Why would anyone want to cause that pain to their pet ?? :confused1:
     
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