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Permethrin Alert: your dog's fleakiller kills cats

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Moglets, Jul 27, 2019.


  1. Moglets

    Moglets PetForums Junior

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    https://icatcare.org/permethrin

    I'm sure everyone here knows that dog products are not for cats but apparently there have been a lot of UK cat deaths caused by dog flea products containing permethrin. Even to the extent of a treated dog snuggling a cat (it does happen!) & thereby poisoning it.

    I thought I'd pass International Cat Care's warning & link on.
     
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  2. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    This was certainly a serious issue in the UK some years back, but I thought flea treatments for dogs no longer contained permethrin because of the risks to cats.

    Though perhaps this is not the case for some flea treatments available outside the EU......
     
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  3. Moglets

    Moglets PetForums Junior

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    Sadly, this is not the case. If you search you'll find they are widely available in the UK.
     
  4. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    Still widely available, but the same ingredients?
     
  5. Moglets

    Moglets PetForums Junior

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    Ummm not sure if I absolutely understood you, Slave to Orientals. Dog flea treatments containing permethrin are widely available in the UK, does that answer the question? When I checked online, there were many offered & almost as many warnings from vets & animal charities. Ghastly, I know.
     
  6. Soozi

    Soozi PetForums VIP

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    OMG a graphic video of the consequences of using this chemical on cats has been posted on my FB Tenerife cat charity page. It’s horrific. Please be very careful everyone. :(
    Phew I have just seen that the cat is at the vet and has survived with intensive treatment and hope he will be Ok they are not 100% sure yet but the signs are positive.
    I think this should be a sticky thread!
     
    #6 Soozi, Jul 28, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2019
  7. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    The flea treatments which were widely available that used to effect cats was dog only flea powder....which is why the move to spots and tablets occured..

    Unless you are going to put your cat in a say a sheep dip...which I don't think happens much either these days...treating for bed bugs possibly it's not in daily use in flea treatments available to dogs.

    The only things where you should worry, and I see here that everytime it's mentioned is use with caution and explain how to use them wisely is household flea sprays.....

    So absolutely agree with @chillminx on this one.

    @Soozi whether this should be a sticky or not I don't know really...as the risk I would say has passed. It used to be highlighted a lot early 90s here in the UK, when I owned my first dog who was a frequent visitor to my mum's house who was a cat owner so I was very aware then of flea treatments so was my mum. I am guessing the horrendous video you have seen has gone viral, maybe due to either old footage or as said something out the EU...the UK used to be bombarded with them at the time absolutely heartbreaking to watch.
     
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  8. Soozi

    Soozi PetForums VIP

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    The video is recent I’m afraid and has just been posted with the permission of the cats owner. There are a lot of ignorant and naive people out there.
    Here’s the post from the Spanish vet treating this particular cat.
    "⚠️⚠️INTOXICATION BY APPLYING A PIPETTE DESTINED FOR DOGS IN A CAT.⚠️⚠️

    Messi, that's what our patient is called, due to carelessness and ignorance of their owners, a pipette was applied to external parasites for dogs.
    Its owners have given us permission to publish this video to warn of the danger that this entails.

    Permethrin is a pyrethroid insecticide, it is mainly used to control fleas and ticks in dogs. It is metabolized through the liver and it is here when complications arise, as cats have different metabolic pathways in the liver with respect to other animals due to a deficiency of the hepatic enzyme glucuronosyl transferase. Exposure to permethrins, even in small amounts, can cause severe and even fatal poisoning in cats.

    On several occasions we have attended such poisonings due to improper use of flea products for dogs in cats.
    The clinical symptoms of permethrin poisoning may appear from a few minutes later until a few hours after the exposure occurred. The most frequent are:

    -Convulsions
    -Tremors
    -Salivation
    -Hyperexcitability
    -Vomiting
    -Dyspnoea

    In the video we can see how Messi, once stabilized and treated with anticonvulsants and intensive fluid therapy, continues to be affected by intoxication as it presents involuntary muscle contractions.
    There is no antidote as a treatment for this type of poisoning, being able to only apply support therapy through anticonvulsants, baths and intravenous fluids.

    In these cases the patient's prognosis is reserved.

    ‍⚕️Veterinaria: Cristina Muñoz"
    (Google translation)
     
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  9. Ottery

    Ottery Cat Lady

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    Well I'm confused. The page the OP linked to is dated 2017 but if it was out of date surely they would have removed it? So it seems there are still dog spot ons containing permethrin.
     
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  10. Rufus15

    Rufus15 Banned

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    Bob Martin still contains it, their products are still widely sold
     
  11. Soozi

    Soozi PetForums VIP

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    It’s obviously still available here! :eek:
     
  12. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Ingredients of widely available Bob Martin spot-on flea killer for dogs :
    • Fipronil - an insecticide that kills fleas for up to 8 weeks in dogs and up to 4 weeks in cats, ticks for 4 weeks in dogs and 2 weeks in cats.
    • S-Methoprene - an insect egg growth regulator (IGR) that stops the development of flea eggs, larvae and pupae at the home and immediate surrounding for 8 weeks.
    Both these chemicals are widely used in spot on flea killers in the UK for dogs and cats. Both are considered safe in use.

    I am not aware of any current Bob Martin flea killer for dogs that contains permethrin. Please provide a link if you know of any. Permethrin has always been an ingredient of household sprays though.
     
    #12 chillminx, Jul 28, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2019
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  13. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    I wonder which make it was Soozi. Was it mentioned in the article? I just checked all the well known makes of dog flea killer available in the UK and can't find any that contain permethrin. They all seem to contain the same ingredients as the type of well known flea killers sold for cats, but in larger doses.

    However, there could be a little known make sold online, e.g. through ebay perhaps, that doesn't have current approval of the UK Veterinary Medicines Directorate. As you say some of the dog products with permethrin are still available in Spain (or else the owner used an old product they'd had in their possession for several years)

    I remember about 4 or 5 years ago, manufacturers who supply the UK and US markets decided to change the ingredients of the dog flea treatment to the same as the treatment for cats, because there had been some incidents of dog treatments being used on cats with fatal results.
     
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  14. Soozi

    Soozi PetForums VIP

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    Sadly hun! The make wasn’t mentioned. I think nearly all common pet medications are available over the counter here. No need for a vets prescription. And I will check when I next go to the major pet store here they follow my cat charity on FB and help them with introduction open days to help with adoptions so I am hoping they don’t stock this stuff. The video I saw will haunt me. :(
    I have just asked the vet Treating the cat what make of flea treatment was used. Not sure the will reply.
     
    #14 Soozi, Jul 28, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2019
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  15. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    The only spot on I know uk based with a warning for cats and rabbits ie don't use is prac-tic which contains pyriprole, but it's very similar to fiprinol.
     
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  16. Soozi

    Soozi PetForums VIP

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    I have really never liked the idea of any flea spot on treatments to be honest, even the safe ones so don’t treat my cat as often as I should. :oops:
    Having said that she only goes in our own Cat proofed garden and doesn’t come into contact with other cats or wildlife that carry fleas.
     
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  17. Soozi

    Soozi PetForums VIP

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    Non committal on make but It seems it was Advantix by bayer. Maybe they thought it was Advantage also made by bayer but is for cats but Advantix is for dogs only and does contain Permethrin.
     
    #17 Soozi, Jul 28, 2019
    Last edited: Jul 28, 2019
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  18. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    I don't treat for ticks per se...that's pretty popular treatment however it's prescription only in the UK...I think it was advantix that you could buy from bitiba though (prescription free) so other places or other people are not heeding warnings...am guessing a vet would not allow a multiple pet (dog and cat for example) home to purchase advantix. There are other alternatives that would suit, with or without prescription. Which is probably why in theory 'this' should not be a problem in the UK. One product in various flea, tick and parasite preparations.

    Checking with @Burrowzig who mentioned a tic treatment from bitiba which I thought was advantix...apologises if not.
     
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  19. Soozi

    Soozi PetForums VIP

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  20. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Like the article states though best probably not to use in multi pet household, especially when other treatments available...and it's not just one or the other either!

    At least I learnt something new anyway today...I only knew about the prac-tic warning because I was asked about it not long ago...
     
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