Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Pedigree papers

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by lymorelynn, Aug 9, 2017.


Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Messages:
    34,632
    Likes Received:
    31,252
    Information provided by @OrientalSlave
    Why buy a Registered Pedigree Kitten?


    A registered kitten will be bred from two parents who are on the active register, and the female will be registered as owned by the breeder. It should be at least 13 weeks old, fully vaccinated, and ready to leave its breeder. Additionally the GCCF will not register kittens where the parents are from very close matings, and if there are required health tests for the breed the parents must have had them. Note that there are additional health tests for some breeds which whilst advisable are not required by the GCCF.

    In contrast BYBs are often breeding from at least one unregistered cat, or cat registered non-active. Most kittens are placed on the non-active register in the expectation that they will be neutered, and have been brought as pets only. Obviously people breeding from these kittens have fibbed when they brought them.

    BYBs may well offer a fake pedigree, and they love selling 8-week old kittens as most of the cost of rearing a kitten is after that age. At 8 weeks the kitten has not been vaccinated, may well not have been wormed, and is only just weaning. Between 8 & 13 weeks old most kittens are eating as much as an adult, use as much cat litter as an adult, and the female can be mated again PDQ.

    If you add up all these costs, an unregistered 8-week old kitten for £350 will end up costing as much as a registered 13-week old kitten, more if it becomes unwell.

    So how do I know my kitten is a registered pedigree?

    As mentioned many times on Pet Forums, a registered pedigree kitten will come with ‘papers’. However, what do those papers look like? What should you receive with a registered kitten?

    GCCF


    The GCCF is the main registry in the UK, and the bare minimum you should receive with a GCCF registered kitten are:
    • A signed pedigree showing at least three generations of cats with their registration and breed numbers, and the breeders name and address. Commonly the fourth generation has the breed numbers only due to space constraints when printing on A4;
    • The kitten’s registration card, which contains the information you need to transfer the cat or kitten into your name;
    • The kitten’s vaccination record – the second vaccination should have been given at least a week before you collect your kitten.
    If the kitten is already microchipped one of the bar-code labels should be stuck to the vaccination card.

    Hopefully you will also receive:

    • A receipt;
    • Details of worming and any flea treatment (not all kittens get flea treatment);
    • Details of a few weeks free insurance;
    • Care instructions;
    • A toy or two;
    • Some food the kitten is used to eating;
    • A comfort blanket.
    Whilst the GCCF rules do allow for kittens younger than 13 weeks and/or unvaccinated kittens to be sold there is never a good reason for the average pet buyer to buy such a kitten.

    Red Flags
    • Charging extra to register a kitten;
    • Allowing any kitten to be registered active for a bigger price;
    • Saying kittens sold as pets don’t need to be registered;
    • Bringing the kitten from somewhere else in the house for you to see;
    • Not allowing you to visit;
    • Not allowing you to see the kitten with mother and litter mates;
    • Any sign of illness in any of the kittens;
    • Litter trays and food dishes should be clean;
    • Handing an unseen kitten over in a car park or similar.
    What if I can’t afford a registered kitten?

    There is no denying a registered kitten will cost several hundred pounds. However, as pointed out above, a young BYB kitten can easily cost just as much (or more) after the expenses of a few weeks ownership, and remember that vet bills can easily exceed the cost of a registered kitten.

    Additionally buying a pet shouldn’t be a spur of the moment thing, giving you time to save up both for the kitten and for a vet fund.

    However if you don’t want to spend £500 or more but want a cat of a specific breed, consider the breed rescues. Most GCCF breed clubs run rescues which rehome a variety of cats, including those whose owners have passed on and former breeding cats who will be much happier in a home on their own, or with a companion instead of lots of companions. These cats will not be free but where they go from home to home rather than via a rescue pen you may only have to pay the cost of neutering, possibly vaccinations, and a donation to the rescue.

    More Information

    Some other sources of information are:





    Benny RegistrationCardRedacted.jpg Fabcat Fantastico Signed.png Fabcat Fantastico Receipt.png
     
    #1 lymorelynn, Aug 9, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 20, 2017
  2. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Messages:
    34,632
    Likes Received:
    31,252
    If someone would like to provide the same sort of information for a TICA registered kitten I will add that too.
     
    PetloverJo, ewelsh and OrientalSlave like this.
  3. lymorelynn

    lymorelynn UN Peacekeeper in training
    Staff Member

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2008
    Messages:
    34,632
    Likes Received:
    31,252
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice