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Parvo virus and other nasty bugs - a way to help your dog fight this horrible disease

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by lady_r0gue, Jul 23, 2009.


  1. lady_r0gue

    lady_r0gue PetForums Senior

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    When my dog was small we lived in a community of low-impact dwellings on a site in a wood. There was around 10 dogs, 15 puppies, cats and kittens, a pig and a goat. A visitor brought a dog infected with parvovirus onto the site and most of the dogs and puppies were affected. To prevent cross-contamination over the quarantine period we scraped up all the woodchip off the floor and burnt it, burnt all the dog poo and soiled bedding and kept everything spotlessly clean with bleach. Parvovirus is a horrible bug with no cure, which lives in the dogs stomach off everything the dog eats and drinks, so the dog will starve itself in order to starve the virus. Unfortunately this can mean that a dog and especially a puppy will often die of dehydration or shock in the time it takes to run it's course. One obvious way to tell that the dog has Parvo apart from vomiting and bloody diarrhoea is that they won't even willingly take water, so will need to be forcefed water with a syringe. We gave the dogs a little salt in the water once a day, this made them vomit but we just hoped a little got in.

    The one Very Important remedy which I wanted to mention was HONEY - some of us fed the dogs warm water in which honey had been dissolved, a 2-3 times a day. Honey has been predigested by the bees so is easily absorbed by the body before it reaches the stomach. This is to give the dogs vital energy, hopefully enough to keep them alive while they starve out the virus.

    One of the infected dogs and two of the smaller puppies sadly died. The three that we lost belonged to other people who hadn't used honey. The other 23 odd canines recovered fine - and my pup? Well he's fit as a fiddle, 9 years later ;)

    I now use honey every time for dogs and people who have no appetite due to vomiting or diarrhoea.
     
    #1 lady_r0gue, Jul 23, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2009
    Changes likes this.
  2. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    This is why vaccinating is so important.
     
  3. rona

    rona Guest

    I hope you are going to tell us all a little about your life in the woods :)
    I would be very interested :thumbup:
     
  4. lady_r0gue

    lady_r0gue PetForums Senior

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    Very true - unfortunately at that time the pups weren't old enough to have been vaccinated; some of the adult dogs had been.
     
  5. lady_r0gue

    lady_r0gue PetForums Senior

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    Hehe - tales from my lefty youth lol - maybe another time Rona ;) sorry, duty calls and I have to get the tea on xx
     
  6. rona

    rona Guest

    Look forward to it :D
     
  7. Burrowzig

    Burrowzig PetForums VIP

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    There is a good bit if ill-informed nonsense here.

    Honey is not predigested by bees at all. They carry nectar from the flower in a stomach, effectively sick it back up into the honeycomb then evaporate any excess moisture from it by fanning it with their wings. Digestion is not part of this process, if it were it would come out of their arses. It's concentrated flower nectar, and has some pollen in that just gets swept up in the proceedure. It's true it's easily absorbed, sugars are, and it does have some antibiotic properties. It was used in the first world war as a wound dressing to prevent infection, sometimes over clean spider-web that has antibiotic properties and also promotes blood clotting in open wounds. Some hospitals are again using honey for preventing infection in wounds, but now they use Manuka honey which is the most effective.

    Parvovirus particles don't live in the gut off food the dog eats and drinks, they are within the tissues and blood of the whole dog. The infection is not 'starved out', the dog recovers when it's immune system has manufactured agents that kill the particular virus.

    I find it extraordinary that none of these several dog owners was responsible enough to vaccinate, and keep vaccination up to date.
     
    #7 Burrowzig, Jul 24, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 24, 2009
  8. rona

    rona Guest

    Found this interesting

    Bees, Bee pollen, Pictures


    Particularly this bit

    Clinical tests show that orally ingested bee pollen particles are rapidly and easily absorbed--they pass directly from the stomach into the blood stream. Within two hours after ingestion, bee pollen is found in the blood, in cerebral spinal fluids, and in the urine.
     
  9. Indie

    Indie PetForums VIP

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    The injections don't always work.
     
  10. lady_r0gue

    lady_r0gue PetForums Senior

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    Bees - Vegan Society


    Honey

    Pre-digested food made by bees from nectar. The bees collect the nectar from flowers and store it in their primary or honey stomach. Here it is partially digested and converted into the substance we call honey.

    Sorry, perhaps my science isn't precise, and I have no idea which dogs had had up-to-date jabs as this was around 9 years ago and they weren't mine (come on, how many of you know or make it your business to know how up-to-date your neighbours dogs' immunisation schedules are??) - I just thought I'd share my findings with the honey treatment and how I'd found it to work wonders with my pup and his siblings :)
     
    #10 lady_r0gue, Jul 26, 2009
    Last edited: Jul 26, 2009
  11. tiddlypup

    tiddlypup PetForums VIP

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    honey is very good for lots of things,its good in helping wounds heal,mum used it all the time when we were kids
    vaccinations arent 100% protection against disease,not all dogs/people will build up the immunities,we just hope they do,thats why in close knit communities like kennels virus spread is a nightmare,i should imagine it would have been the same in a smallclose knit group living in the woods,would love to live like that but just me and the dogs:D
    p.s. i love using natural/homeopathic remedies
     
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