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Pain relief without presciption

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by Redice, Aug 3, 2017.


  1. Redice

    Redice PetForums Senior

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    I would like to keep some kind of Pain relief medication in the dogs first aid box.
    Humans are able to self medicate with Ibuprofen, Paracetamol, Aspirin etc so why can't dogs??. I wouldn't ever give human meds to the dogs but there are some things available without prescription like Rimadyl on some of the dog medicine websites.
    Obviously if there was a bad injury then I would seek a Vets advice but there are times when it isn't really necessary. Recently my elderly dog got knocked into by another and was sore for a couple of days. It was clear he just needed time to get better and by luck I had some metacam in stock and after a couple of days he was as right as rain and it was nice to have something to keep him comphy for those 2 days. Also one of my dogs occasional gets swimmers tail and usually when we are on holiday and it would be nice to have something that I could give him.
    I do have some arnica in stock but it would be nice to have something a bit more substantial in the first aid box can anyone suggest anything safe? I am interested in Pardale V on Viovet.
     
    #1 Redice, Aug 3, 2017
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2017
  2. wee man

    wee man PetForums VIP

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    I was going to mention Arnica, this is a safe back up, but you all ready have this.
     
  3. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Why not speak to the vet for advice?

    They will know what is safe to give.
     
    lullabydream likes this.
  4. SusieRainbow

    SusieRainbow Moderator
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    Medicating a dog is different from 'self medicating'. Dogs metabolise substances very differently, what could be a normal dose for a human , even reduced to the equivalent dose for the dog's weight , could be a fatal overdose in dogs. And in some cases the dog can tolerate what would seem a higher dose in relation to weight. I agree , you need to take veterinary advice on tis but having a first aid box is a good idea. I have one , it contains
    Prokolin
    Piriton syrup
    Ranitidine
    Yu=digest
    Dorwest Herb remedies
    Zylkene
     
    lullabydream likes this.
  5. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    We were told by our vet when our dog pulled her neck and we couldn't get to the vets until the next day, as she was a large dog a couple of Aspirin a day wouldn't do any harm, but not as a long term cure, but we only gave her half not a whole one.
     
  6. Redice

    Redice PetForums Senior

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    Yes, I wasn't suggesting I would give human medication unless told to do so by the vet but there are some medicines specifially for dogs marketed as painkilliers and would be interested in using them. There is Parvale (has paracetamol), a doggy aspirin and Rimadyl but was wondering what people use and if there are any others to consider.
     
  7. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    My JR has IBD and, whilst it's pretty much under control now, I asked my Vet for painkillers to give her, should she have a flare up as she is in a lot of pain.

    He gave me Tramadol for her. I haven't needed to use them as yet.
     
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