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Overgrown teeth in rabbits

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by Wim, Dec 18, 2007.


  1. Wim

    Wim PetForums Junior

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    Rabbits are, generally speaking, nervous animals, but homeopathic remedies can be very helpful to overcome the fear of being handled. Incisors (overgrown teeth) can cause loss of appetite and weight and need to be clipped by a professional.

    If you want/need to prevent shock and bruising give Arnica 6c, 12c or 30c (or 6k,12k or 30k) and dose daily in the food and water for a few (=2-3) days before and after treatment.

    Crush 1-2 tablets or a few pellets/pillules with a clean spoon on a piece of paper, or between 2 clean spoons, and place half the powder on the food and half in the water.
     
  2. Wim

    Wim PetForums Junior

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    Same treatment is possible for rats and mice.
     
  3. Eolabeo

    Eolabeo Guest

    Ty for that info.

    i like to learn all this learn stuff like this coz my daughter is in colledge doing animal managment, so it is handy for her to pass this onto other students or even tell the teacher to see if he/she knows this sort of stuff :D
     
  4. Wim

    Wim PetForums Junior

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    Hello loe,

    You`re welcome !.....Happy Christmas !.....:)
     
  5. swinnk8

    swinnk8 PetForums Junior

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    The most effective treatment for malocclusion in rabbits front teeth is to have them removed rather than clipped. This gives the back teeth a chance to sit properly and gringd together better when eating. Clipping a rabbits teeth all the time can cause pain and stress to the rabbit and rabbits can live without their front teeth and eat perfectly well.
    Also put the rabbits on a pelleted diet like burgess excel, plenty of fibre (hay), and also root vegetables. Also adequate gnawing blocks or apple wood.The rabbit will still need its regular vet check to look at the back teeth for spurs, but it will improve the rabbits quality of life.
    I have many a experience with teeth problems in rabbits i have rescued/kept. I am qualified in pet care and livestock management too, which is part of the college course but can be done through the pet care trust in bedfordshire, if you are interested in the subject. You donot have to be a college student. The course is designed to give you knowledge and a certificate which is need to get a pet shop licence. They do have their own website.

    Small rodents should have adequate gnawing blocks designed for the species in thier cage to stop overgrown incisors. Their incisors can be clipped by the vet if there is an abnormality.
     
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