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Our puppy wont stop crying

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by PuppyGuy, Aug 1, 2018.


  1. PuppyGuy

    PuppyGuy PetForums Newbie

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    Our 3 month old Beagle wont stop crying,especially at night. Whenever he is in his area and we leave him alone, he cries and barks, sometimes jumping over the fence. He is comfortable with his crate and sleeps in it,maybe after a really long day. We walk him, play with him and all but many nights he can't or won't sleep. I thought that he really wants attention: after all,he is a puppy and they need attention so we try to be with him at most, but we can't be with him all day. I browsed the internet and tried most of the stuff... we couldn't get him trained and/or calmed after numerous days and tries.I don't know what to do. What should we do?
     
  2. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Have his crate in your room.

    Then you can reassure him with your voice and being close by should help him settle.

    Gradually, you can wean him off of you, though he will naturally become more independent as he settles and grows anyway.

    How long have you had him?

    How long is he left during the day?

    How much exercise is he getting? Too much could make him difficult up settle.
     
    PuppyGuy, JoanneF and lullabydream like this.
  3. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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    I don't like leaving puppies to cry - they are distressed for a reason (almost certainly being alone in this case). So I agree have him in your room - it doesn't have to be forever. Comforting him when he is distressed is fine and will strengthen your bond. Unfortunately many people make the mistake of allowing a puppy to cry in the hope that they grow out of it, when actually all they have done is cement in the puppies mind that being left in the crate (or alone, or whatever is causing the crying) is indeed a terrible thing, and for many dogs this fear becomes a learned habit.

    Gradually you can start moving the crate or bed away to outside the bedroom door, near the room you want him to sleep in, and eventually into that room. With puppies learning, everything is done in little steps, and if anything starts to fail, you go back a step and stay there longer.

    Also in your room you are more likely to hear him if he moves and needs out to toilet. With young puppies it's too long to expect them to hold on all night (their little bladder and bowels aren't big enough or strong enough) so set your alarm for a couple of times in the night.

    During the day though you should start to get him used to being alone for short periods so when he isn't interacting with you (to make your leaving less of a contrast) just walk out the room then back in - build up the time gradually.
     
    PuppyGuy and Lurcherlad like this.
  4. Jackie Lee

    Jackie Lee Banned

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    Poor puppy, you just need to be patient! Time will come he will overcome to that. God bless.
     
  5. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    So leave him crying?

    Honestly, you have no idea :rolleyes:
     
  6. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    What and face a puppy that becomes shut down and withdrawn and not confident.

    As before, I suggest you do decent research before replying to threads. Not Google as you have given terrible advice in health and nutrition that could have caused a great deal of harm. Instead of listening you chose to argue then.

    If you do not know. Please do not reply. Take time reading here where replies have been liked by many members usually give an indication that a reply is good, sensible advice.
     
  7. PuppyGuy

    PuppyGuy PetForums Newbie

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    I have had him less than a month now.The time depends on the day,but it usually takes about 2 to 5 hours...Because I live in a condominium, we have some looping "road",to guess 100 to 300 meters:usually looping 5 to 8 laps.
     
  8. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

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  9. PuppyGuy

    PuppyGuy PetForums Newbie

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    I like your idea of having him close to me.Some problems are that I am a really a deep sleeper, so I can't wake up if he is moving around or signaling me to potty. I use training pads for him because of that, and he knows to potty on them.But there are places he cant go like under my bed and places with wires.I wonder if I could use a fence to limit his area...Also, my room is upstairs and his 'available' or the place I would like him to sleep is downstaris so I dont know how that transition would work on that case. Anyway thanks for the tips!
     
  10. PuppyGuy

    PuppyGuy PetForums Newbie

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    A quick note: We have lately used some distraction toys,like putting some snacks in a crushed bottle and bones to distract him.But many times he ends up finishing them and crying when he hears a minimal sound.
     
  11. danielled

    danielled Guest

    Training pads are very bad. They just confuse them by making them think inside is the place to go. Set an alarm.
     
    Magyarmum likes this.
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