Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

On buzzards again - West Sussex this time

Discussion in 'Rabbits' started by RWAF, Apr 21, 2011.


  1. RWAF

    RWAF PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    2
    Another warning following the first alert of yesterday.



    In response to the recent message about Buzzards. I was in the garden last Sunday with one of my rabbits who was roaming free (safely). She suddenly became very frightened and froze. I desperately was looking around and could not see what was upsetting her. I then heard a vulture-like cry and looked up to see 2 buzzards circling above the garden. They did not seem frightened of me at all, even though I was standing right next to her. I brought her in and only them did the birds disperse. Very worrying.



    Sue Aburrow



    Ashington, West Sussex .
     
  2. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2009
    Messages:
    17,011
    Likes Received:
    9,452
    Buzzards pose very little physical risk to rabbits, and domestic pets in general.

    As long as rabbits have a shelter and somewhere to bolt/hide in (which all rabbit owners should be providing as standard to maintain basic welfare standards), then they are in no danger from our native BOP.

    I find posts like this a way of scaremongering, and vilifying our native wildlife which has a greater right to be here than our domestic pets.

    Buzzards are naturally wary and shy birds, and very rarely venture into gardens unless one has a country estate.
     
  3. RWAF

    RWAF PetForums Member

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2011
    Messages:
    322
    Likes Received:
    2
    I'm sorry, I have to object to this. I am NOT scaremongering and neither are the members of RWAF who have reported the situation.

    Rabbits are prey animals and as such are extremely frightened of predators. A rabbit can die of fright when it senses a predator is around. The predator does not need to actually attack it.

    Whilst buzzards may well MOSTLY go for carrion, that doesn't mean they ONLY go for carrion and will attack small animals.

    I fully agree, any rabbits or other small animals exercising outside must be kept in safe enclosures and have somewhere to run and hide, and maybe some owners haven't thought to provide a covered part to their runs where the pets may hide from perceived dangers - this should serve as a warning to them to provide it.

    Let's face it, too, not every owner provides a secure run. By seeing that there is potential danger - and surely warnings like this should focus their thinking - perhaps they will think more carefully and provide the run their rabbits or other small animals need, with fox. bird of prey, cat and other predator proofing, and somewhere to hide included.

    I don't wish to be rude to anybody, but when there is a warning of potential danger to rabbits, as a responsible person, I feel it is my duty to issue a warning
     
  4. emzybabe

    emzybabe PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 30, 2009
    Messages:
    5,786
    Likes Received:
    90
    I spent last summer living at a farm, I loved watching the buzzards circling in the fields.They never showed any interest in my rabbits, while they were in their run or while I was with them in the garden. I would imagine a domestic rabbit is far easier to catch than a wild one. With the ban on many pesticides birds of pray are on the rise which is great, but we must be really careful and only let our pet buns out for free range when we can fully supervise.
     
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice