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Olive wood/antlers/other chews advice

Discussion in 'Dog Health and Nutrition' started by doce_24, Mar 13, 2021.


  1. doce_24

    doce_24 PetForums Newbie

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    I have two cockapoos - 7 years old and 8 months old - who both love to chew. The 7 year old is a very aggressive chewer - toys last minutes with him, and as he often pulls chunks off and sometimes swallows them, we can't give him toys a lot of the time. He likes yaks chews but chews them so hard it made his teeth bleed. Anything edible like pigs ears are gone within minutes, and he takes off big chunks to swallow. We bought him an olive wood chew at the start of last year and he loved it, it didn't seem too hard and it went to a softer stage once he'd had a good chew on it. When we got the younger one, he also loved gnawing on split antlers and puppy sized yaks chews. As they have both been enjoying the olive wood chews so much, and have demolished the ones we've had in, I ordered 4 large ones to keep them going. They have just arrived and they are rock solid. I let the older dog chew on it and it sounded like he was risking cracking a tooth he was putting so much force into chewing it. I've taken it off him and I don't know what to do. I can't give him anything he can properly destroy as he will swallow it (i.e toys, pigs ears), I've tried yaks chews and he was taking chunks out of that, the olive wood and antler chews are the last option, but he puts so much force into them I'm so anxious he will break a tooth. I don't want to take away all his options to chew because its a necessary activity for him - but what will be safest? All the googling says never give them anything you can't make an indent with your nail, but surely dogs have always chewed on things like bones which are just as hard? It feels like either risk him breaking a tooth or getting a blockage.
     
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