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Older cats

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by Pollypudding, Feb 9, 2019.


  1. Pollypudding

    Pollypudding PetForums Newbie

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    Do you have an older cat? If so does your older cat require extra care? I have a 14 nearly 15 year old cat, a few health issues,but doing remarkable well.
     
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  2. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    Have you got some photos of yours @Pollypudding? I've had older cats in the past. I think you just have to look out for any changes in them which might mean they have a medical problem, though you say yours already has some issues. In the wintertime, make sure they've got enough warmth, are eating OK etc., but lots of older cats are fine other than slowing down a bit. My friend's cat will be 21 this month and, apart from having mild kidney disease, he is doing OK.
     
  3. Bertie'sMum

    Bertie'sMum Obedient Cat Slave

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    All my previous cats have lived well into their late teens - the last one (Harrycat) did develop CKD and had arthritis in his hips, but still went on till 18 when both conditions worsened an dhe had to be pts. The one previous to Harrycat did have thyroid problems in his last couple of years but that was managed with medication until he passed away at age 19.

    My current cat is 9 (geriatric in insurance terms :rolleyes:) but is currently fit and healthy :)

    I think the obvious things to look out for in older cats are CKD, arthritis (especially if they tend to be on the podgy side) and thyroid problems.
     
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  4. Pollypudding

    Pollypudding PetForums Newbie

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    My cat is doing really well,he is an indoor cat,
     
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  5. Ringypie

    Ringypie PetForums VIP

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    Flint is 12 this year!! No special care here, the 3 of them are treated like little princes anyway though!! He is vaccinated so each year he has a little MoT with the vet and we keep an eye on his weight as it’s no good at all for them to get fat.
     
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  6. SbanR

    SbanR PetForums VIP

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    You can't mention Flint without accompanying photo!;)
     
  7. 1CatOverTheLine

    1CatOverTheLine PetForums Senior

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    .
    @Pollypudding - My two oldest currently - Lance and Peanut: Brothers born a few minutes apart - will begin their twenty-third year with me on April fifth. Both can still make the jump to the kitchen counters (38½ inches), and both still run and play with the other cats - though they might tire a bit more quickly these days. Peanut's eyesight is beginning to fail, and Lance has a touch of arthritis in one front leg - but neither seem particularly age-affected.

    My late Father's cat, Victoria, came to me when he passed on, and was still energetic - and very much the Evil Siamese - in her mid-twenties - and honestly never really slowed down perceptibly (other than clearly missing her Daddy) until about the middle of her twenty-eighth year. By the Winter of her approaching thirtieth birthday, it was clear that she'd had enough, and a few weeks before reaching thirty, she'd move only for meals and for a still-legged walk to her little box.

    Other than Lance and Peanut who are still with me, the seven remaining here:

    catsintheirtwenties1.jpg


    all left this world right here at home - a little tired, but not affected any any major maladies nor ills. Keep their Lives happy, let them know that they're Loved, and keep them safe indoors, and most cats will live on into their very late teens or twenties - and a few right into their thirties.

    This:

    says that you already know the secret to long Life. My eleven send their regards.
    .
     
  8. Ringypie

    Ringypie PetForums VIP

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    I shall update his own thread :D
     
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  9. Ringypie

    Ringypie PetForums VIP

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    Wow!! What fantastic long lives they have all lived. I do hope oursfollow suit!
     
  10. Incredible ages! What do you feed them, and what did your father feed his?
     
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  11. 1CatOverTheLine

    1CatOverTheLine PetForums Senior

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    @Ringypie - I've no doubt that yours will.

    @shingigz - In a word, Cat Candy. As with all cats, they Love Fancy Feast - and especially the "Medleys" varieties, and because it makes them happy. that's their three-times-daily fare. My veterinarian - a long time close Friend - agrees: a happy cat will outlive an unhappy cat by years, simply by dint of Loving Life.

    Unscientific? You bet it is. You know, it's physically impossible for a Bumblebee to fly as well.
    .
     
  12. I don't think it's available in England or I would definitely buy some on your glowing report. I just had a look at the ingredients of a random-chosen one - it contains a lot of vitamins.

    Edit: I see it on Amazon UK site.

    Edit: it is very expensive though!
     
    #12 Deleted member 1482176, Feb 9, 2019
    Last edited by a moderator: Feb 9, 2019
  13. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @1CatOverTheLine - I have never heard of any cat in the UK living to nearly 30, whether indoor or outdoor! That surely has to be a record, even in your country?!

    Perhaps cats in the USA have better genes, or a more pioneering spirit, lol. :D

    Cats living to 19, 20 or 21 is quite unusual in the UK. Only one of mine has lived to 20 so far. The rest lived to 18 or 19.

    What is nice is that all my cats have stayed youthful, active and playful for a long time, and I recall vets remarking on how healthy they've been right into their mid-teens. This seems to be less usual here, judging by many of my friends' and relatives' experiences with their cats e.g. some have cats who seem elderly at 11 or 12.
     
    #13 chillminx, Feb 9, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
  14. 1CatOverTheLine

    1CatOverTheLine PetForums Senior

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    @chillminx -The official record - kept by those fine British Brewers, the Mssrs. Guinness - is thirty-eight years, three days; the runner up was thirty-right years exactly. There's a voluntary-only list of the confirmed longer-aged cats here:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_oldest_cats

    showing more than a dozen cats aged thirty years and older. For cats who live strictly indoor-only Lives, 25 is far from uncommon. I've never yet seen a motorcar careening through any room in my home.

    ;)
    .
     
  15. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    I wonder if it is in part good genes as well as a good wet food diet. Many of those long lived cats look to be Siamese, maybe they are generally long lived? I did know a Siamese several years ago that lived into her early twenties.
     
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  16. It may be true that cats usually live longer when kept indoors only. But life span isn't everything in my book. In the words of Neale Donald Walsch, “Try not to confuse longevity with a job well done.” This isn't as harsh as it sounds, but is more profound.

    There is never a right time to die. Cats killed by cars is a possibility for sure. But millions upon millions of cats that are allowed access to the outdoors don't get run over. And though outdoor-allowed cats may not live as long generally, they have a whole different dimension of happiness and richness to their lives. Each situation needs to be measured carefully; there's no one-size-fits-all in my opinion.
     
  17. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    Good point @shingigz :)

    My outdoor cats were not killed by cars anyway, so the prescription of 'safe indoors = a longer life' doesn't apply in my case. Nor did they die of any transferable disease, they died of one of the two most common diseases that affect older cats, i.e. CKD or cancer.

    All my cats were fed a wet food diet, mostly home cooked meat and offal with a vitamin and mineral supplement added. No dry food ever. They also had fresh raw meat 3 times a week, way before it became fashionable to feed cats raw meat. So I definitely do not attribute their "early" deaths at 18 or 19 to an inadequate diet.
     
    #17 chillminx, Feb 10, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
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  18. They probably had fresh raw meat several times a day outside..
     
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  19. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    :D Yes, and better still it would have been "species appropriate" meat too. ;)
     
    #19 chillminx, Feb 10, 2019
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
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  20. Arny

    Arny PetForums Senior

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    Honestly I think getting to a good age is mostly luck, you can help increase the chances by giving a good diet and kept away from some dangers by maybe keeping inside but with all the will in world many just aren't going to live that long.

    The youngest cat I've had die was 17 1/2, the kittens we kept from her died at just short of 18, 18 1/2 and just short of 20. Two of her kittens that went to other people died quite young though, one from a brain tumour and the other kidney disease. The one with kidney disease maybe could have been prevented depending on the diet but I highly doubt the brain tumour would have any other outcome if we kept her.
    My previous cats to those died at 22 and 23, mother and daughter. All had 24hrs access to outside. Like Chillminx I don't feed any dry.

    To answer the OP's question I don't treat them any different in their older years.
     
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