Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

Old dog...new behaviour

Discussion in 'Dog Training and Behaviour' started by CherylO, Feb 19, 2020.


  1. CherylO

    CherylO PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Feb 18, 2020
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I’m looking for advice for our 13 year old Newfoundland. Over the past year or so she has started to chew certain things in the house - most recent being a photo frame!! She has never been a dog to chew or play with toys so it’s very bizarre. She has also decided that 3am is time to wake up and she won’t leave us alone until someone gets up with her. We also have a 9 year old Newf who is now joining in and dances around at half 3 looking for food. If anyone has any advice or help, our tired household would appreciate it. Tia
     
  2. JoanneF

    JoanneF PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2016
    Messages:
    8,871
    Likes Received:
    18,880
    Maybe have your old lady checked for canine cognitive dysfunction (dementia). Even if she does have it there are medications that can help.
     
    CherylO, Twiggy and Torin. like this.
  3. Billbailey

    Billbailey Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2019
    Messages:
    447
    Likes Received:
    621
    At her age, it might be worth a vet check for the onset of dementia. A new behaviour like that is often a symptom.
     
    CherylO and JoanneF like this.
  4. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2009
    Messages:
    17,803
    Likes Received:
    13,524
    Is there a test for it. I was talking to my vet about it because I was wondering about Candy and she told me most people just manage it if they think their dog has it.
     
  5. Torin.

    Torin. PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    May 18, 2014
    Messages:
    5,061
    Likes Received:
    7,298
    The most common way to test is via a medication trial i.e. be prescribed a medication at a dose that will help if it is the issue, and see if there's a resultant change in behaviour.

    You and your vet need to be happy with the risks attached to medicating if it isn't this, and you need to be aware of the placebo effect and how you're interpreting things (taking a log can be more objective than merely remembering what you think the differences are).
     
    JoanneF likes this.
  6. Billbailey

    Billbailey Banned

    Joined:
    Dec 22, 2019
    Messages:
    447
    Likes Received:
    621
    CherylO and JoanneF like this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice