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Old age joint problems - remedies?

Discussion in 'Cat Health and Nutrition' started by Merry Dogs, May 26, 2010.


  1. Merry Dogs

    Merry Dogs PetForums Member

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    Hello!

    My 14 yr old cat has started to get weakness in his back legs. My vet suggested joint supplements might help and I wondered if anyone could recommend anything they have used? My vet suggested sin-something (will find out what and post it).

    :)
     
  2. Tobacat

    Tobacat PetForums Senior

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    It might be worth trying to see what you can find out about glucosamine. My auntie's dog has it for his joints. I know cats can take it as there is just 125mg Glucosamine in my cat's Cytease which she has for her cystitis.
     
  3. hobbs2004

    hobbs2004 PetForums VIP

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    Tobacat is spot on - glucosamine is a great amino sugar, and it is very frequently used for joint problems and arthritis. You can also get green lip mussel powder, which also does wonders for arthritis and other joint issues in cats, dogs and humans (it contains a derivatives: glycosaminoglycan).

    I personally would try to supplement my cat's food with either of these two before going down a different route.
     
  4. Merry Dogs

    Merry Dogs PetForums Member

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    Thanks for the advice - I will look into these. I was hoping for something 'natural' so this might be the answer. My mum takes glucosamine. She will think it is funny if she shares the same remedy with my mog :)
     
  5. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    Your vet was probably talking about synoquin, which is a vet brand of glucosamine and pretty expensive. I am currently using cortaflex and think it offers pretty good value...tbh most vet formulations are a complete rip off. I am sure that an adjusted dose of a human version would be fine....ask your vet to check the ingredients and strength to be sure. I also use salmon oil or fish oil ( not cod liver oil )...cheap and a good all-rounder!
     
  6. Dally Banjo

    Dally Banjo PetForums VIP

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    Simba 16 is on Glucosomine one way or the other he is alot better on his pins now :D Banjo (dog) is on the Synoquin very good but very expensive his insuance pays though :D
     
  7. hobbs2004

    hobbs2004 PetForums VIP

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    The other natural product to point out is rosehip powder, which also does wonders for joints and arthritis.
     
  8. Merry Dogs

    Merry Dogs PetForums Member

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    Yes, synoquin was the one she mentioned. I thought there should be more options as it is a common problem for cats, dogs and us too.
     
  9. hobbs2004

    hobbs2004 PetForums VIP

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  10. ClaireLily

    ClaireLily PetForums Senior

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    We used to have a bunny with hip problems, we used to give her evening primrose oil mixed with tomato juice soaked into bread it worked wonders. The oil and the potassium from the tom juice is what does it apparently!

    This info was from a rabbit breeder who tried as far as possible to use natural remedies on her animals rather than chemicals but I cat physiology isn't that much different from bunny.
     
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