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Ohh so sad

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by mol mols, Jan 18, 2012.


  1. mol mols

    mol mols PetForums Newbie

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    Hi took the plunge to buy a new puppy, and bought her home aged 7 weeks. The breeder said she was happy to let the pups go at this age as they were feeding well. On Sunday morning after a few hours of owning her we noticed a big lump between her back legs could'nt believe the size of it, it was the size of a small chickens egg we immediately rang the breeder and said we were taking her back . There was no problem with a refund as it was sat on the side waiting for us. We were told that the pups were vet checked at 2 weeks old but find it hard to see how this inguinal hernia as I think it is, could have been missed. The pup is having an operation today . Bless her she is so young to be having surgery we are so upset. I would still like to have her all being well but dont know if I should be letting my heart over rule my head . Can anyone advise
     
  2. Ameliarate

    Ameliarate PetForums Member

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    I can't advise I'm afraid but poor little baby. Still if it is simply a hernia I would have imagined it was relatively simple to sort. Two of my nephews has similar ops as babies and are fine now.
     
  3. mol mols

    mol mols PetForums Newbie

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    Thanks I hope she will be ok. I cant help feeling we should have been more vigulant when picking her up, and did realise that she should have been staying with her mum and the breeder for at least another week
     
  4. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Wasnt sure how serious Inguinal hernias are as its usually umbilical Hernia you hear of as a problem in pups, and those can even repair themselves sometimes I believe if not too bad. I think like the Umbilical ones they can either be hereditary/congenital present at birth, or the result of injury. Pregnant bitches can develope them too. It looks like that they are more complex both themselves and surgery wise, but it looks like they can get good results and if checked out and repaired properly things should be OK.
    I would point out though that any re-occurances or complications later you wont be able to claim on any insurance for, so that is something you would need to consider. This may help.

    What Are Hernias?

    Hernias are bulges or tears in your pet's body wall that allow body organs and tissue to pass into areas where they do not belong.

    Hernias are quite similar to sidewall bulges on automobile tires. Some are a minor inconvenience while others are life-threatening conditions. Some are present from birth (congenital) while others are the result of injury. When the hernia’s contents can be pressed back into normal position it is called a reducible hernia. If the contents of the hernia do not receive adequate blood supply it is called a strangulated hernia.



    Inguinal Hernias:

    Hernias in the groin commonly occur in female dogs that are pregnant or experiencing bloating or constipation. I occasionally see the problem in male dogs as well. In all cases, tissue that belongs in the rear of the abdominal cavity presses
    out through a weak area surrounding the femoral artery and nerve. Usually the hernia sac contains nothing but fat. It is reducible back into the abdomen with finger pressure. Under general anesthesia, this sac can be carefully dissect out with scissors and scalpel until it resembles a small balloon attached to the thigh Then it can be carefully replace it into the abdomen. One has to be very cautious when darning the hole shut, not to pinch the femoral artery or nerve. It is quite common for a second hernia form later on the unaffected opposite groin so to be safe, both sides should be carefully checked and any weakness reinforced. I occasionally see inguinal hernias in immature pekingeses - too young to become pregnant. The condition also occasionally occurs in males. When it does the surgery is the same. Post surgical scaring reinforces and blocks future hernias at the site – if the surgery is done meticulously, it will not reoccur.

    Hope this may help you make a decision.
     
  5. mol mols

    mol mols PetForums Newbie

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    Thank you so much this gives me someting to think about, forgot to say that she is a westie and have read that they can be prown to this condition, we were trying so hard to assure we got a healthy baby this time as our last westie was plagued with skin trouble omg cant believe our luck we did tell this breeder of our past experience and would hate to think that they sold her to us knowing of her condition the lump was so big that it was hard to miss though. just so concerned about her .
     
  6. newfiesmum

    newfiesmum Banned

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    Ferdie had a hernia repair before I got him at three months. I don't know what sort, but it has never bothered him since.

    I have to say though that in your position, I would have phone a vet first.
     
  7. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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  8. mol mols

    mol mols PetForums Newbie

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    well yes we did think about it but seeing we only had her a matters of hours we felt that taking her back was the best thing to do. Glad your dog made a full recovery.
     
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