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New puppy 8 weeks old

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Rebeccac92, Jul 12, 2017.


  1. Rebeccac92

    Rebeccac92 PetForums Junior

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    I got poppy my 8 week old cockapoo on Saturday and I am struggling to cope!! Myself and my partner both work full time so during the day she is left in my kitchen/dining room in her crate. So far she has slept just on her bed with free reign of the kitchen worh puppy pads laid out, then she slept just in her crate. I am struggling to tell when she needs a wee resulting in her just doing in the kitchen everywhere but her puppy pads.
    I need ANY advice on where to let her sleep, how many times to pander to her whining, what should I do in the evenings? Is she allowed free reign of the house whilst we are here or should she just be in her crate.

    I am so tired so apologies if this doesn't even make any sense
     
  2. Mirandashell

    Mirandashell Banned

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    How long is she left alone in the day?
     
  3. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

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    So, is she left crated for the entire day?

    Yes, she should be with you in the evening, you can't really crate her all day, all evening and, presumably, all night.

    You will struggle to housetrain her if she's using pads indoors through the day. She doesn't really understand where she's supposed to go.
     
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  4. CheddarS

    CheddarS PetForums VIP

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    She won't know when she needs to go, so you need to tell her...every time she wakes up, eats, plays and every 30 mins. You will need to stay out till she does her business and reward tons.

    Puppies are hard work, but you have to be consistent.
     
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  5. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    I'm sorry, you have 8 week old puppy and you are leaving her all day on her own, would you leave a new born baby all day on it's own. Can't you have a few weeks holiday to be with her while she settles in she must be dreadfully lonely shut in a crate all day.
     
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  6. Rebeccac92

    Rebeccac92 PetForums Junior

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    No sorry I forgot to say my partner comes home at 12 for an hour. So she is in there 8-12 then 1-4.30. I'm a teacher so do break up for summer next week which is when I was originally planning on getting a puppy but selfishly I saw her at the weekend and couldn't resist
     
  7. Mirandashell

    Mirandashell Banned

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    So she's left for 4 hours and then for 3 and a half? That is quite long for a young puppy. But if you are breaking up next week I guess you can work on the problems then.

    As for puppy pads, puppies have to be trained to use them. They won't just go on them if you put them down. And young puppies are similar to young babies in that they don't always know beforehand that they need a pee. They just pee. So you have to teach them when to pee by taking them outside, as suggested in a post above.

    There's a puppy support thread in Dog Chat. Quite a few people on there sharing their experiences of having puppies. You should get a lot of advice and support on there.
     
  8. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

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    Puppies her age have small bladders and cant hold such large quantities and for long periods like older dogs so therefore they need to go to the toilet much more frequently and more times then older dogs do. She should also be having at least 4 meals a day with the daily total amount of food split into four equal meals and spread evenly spaced apart, so as well as having to urinate more frequently they usually defeacate more too.
    Puppies also don't often recognise the need to go far in advance hence they often get caught short and have accidents. They also need to be taken out very frequently for toilet training, and also after drinking, eating, playing and sleeping which is often when they also need to go to the toilet. If you are not there to teach her the correct place to go, and praise and reward when she toilets in the correct place to re-enforce she has got it right and encourage her to do it again, then you are going to have a hard time toilet training.

    Puppies also tend to get stressed on leaving mum and litter mates and all that's familiar, so will tend to cry and whine, they do need company and training. At her age she probably cant go through the night yet completely without need to relieve herself, with mine I always have them within sight and sound at night, so that when they stir or wake and need to go I can pop them out to toilet, you then find as the days go by the need to go in the night gets less and they will eventually be able to go all night.

    If you are leaving her alone all day or for several hours on end she will need to go and without supervision and training she will just go where she sees fit, to her its normal to do it in the house and where she happens to be at the time because she doesn't know any different.

    Crating is only an aid to toilet training, the theory behind it is that a pup or dog wont soil their bed or the immediate surrounding area or where they eat, but if they need to go and left with no alternative or supervision then they will do it in a crate if they have too, which in turn can cause stress. Crating is fine for when you really cant watch and take them out inbetween but they shouldn't be incarcerated in a crate for long periods or hours on end. There is still as said the problem of having no company and being alone still for long periods.
    They also have to settle and be trained to cope alone gradually. Cockapoos are an active intelligent breed and without company and metal and physical stimulation they will vocalise and whine, most puppies will come to that whatever breed they are.
     
  9. lorilu

    lorilu PetForums VIP

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    A lot of good advice already. But oh please, please, change your perspective on this.

    You are talking about a baby here. An infant who has just lost everything she has ever known and found herself in a strange place, strange people, and left alone for many hours at a time. "Pandering" has nothing to do with it. She's a baby whose whole world has turned upside down, of course she cries. When she cries, comfort her.

    It's not pandering. It's giving comfort and love, which she very much needs.
     
    #9 lorilu, Jul 13, 2017
    Last edited: Jul 13, 2017
  10. Jamesgoeswalkies

    Jamesgoeswalkies PetForums VIP

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    Firstly you will have gathered by now that collecting her on a whim when you were unable to fulfil her needs (and you actually only had to wait about 10 days) was very unfair on your puppy. The breeder of your puppy needs a good talking to. I wouldn't have let one of mine go in those circumstances.

    We also don't take puppies away from their homes and litter mates, thrust them into an unknown environment, leave them all day (with an hour break at lunchtime) and then complain they are not peeing on the puppy pads or that they are whining for attention in the evening. Start seeing your puppy as a living being. A full time commitment. Expect to be exhausted!

    To answer your questions - personally I would be giving her the run of the kitchen for the time frame that you have to leave her. Who cares if she pee's on the floor ...your puppy hasn't got anyone there to teach her any different. You can start that when you are there to give her some time. Puppies need to be taken out very regularly to teach them toilet training. Personally I am not in favour of a crate being used to prevent toileting accidents. This works on the surmise that puppies hate to pee near their beds therefore will hold on until we get home to let them out. Sorry but no puppy should be forced to wait 4 to 5 hours. She'll end up peeing on her bed, lying in it and becoming distressed or with an UTI.

    Puppies can and should be left but it is a graduated process ...we fit in with their timings for toileting and for feeding until they are old enough to cope.

    As for the 'pandering to her whining'. Ditto Lorilu's post above. Puppies are not used to isolation so expect some attention seeking when you are home. Give her some quality time with you ...playing, cuddling, in the garden etc etc. Do not continue to separate her. In fact, do not expect to have any time to yourself at this stage .......that's a luxury you can regain after puppy has grown up.

    Once you are home for the holidays and can begin to give her some time then the training can begin.

    J
     
  11. Mat Coulton

    Mat Coulton PetForums Newbie

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    Hi Rebecca,

    It's not the most ideal situation for a new puppy but far from the worst so don't stress too much about that.

    It's definitely important to try and stop the peeing in the house as soon as possible. Not only does the smell of urine encourage remarking, practicing the behavior reinforces it and makes it even harder to fix.

    I'm sure you already know this stuff but try and follow these rules if possible:
    • If you cannot supervise your dog, they do not get to have run of the house. Go back to the puppy days of kenneling or confining your dog when they cannot be supervised.
    • Take them out to potty after naps, after meals, in the morning and night at a minimum. Additional trips outside are always a good idea to curb peeing in the house.
    • Reward liberally every time your dog eliminates outside. Use high value rewards and plenty of praise.
    Most important of all, try to remain calm and patient as you help your dog sort through their problem. Your dog is not trying to upset you, nor are they peeing in the house to deliberately get under your skin.

    If your own stress levels get out of control it can only make the problem worse for your dog.
     
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  12. DaisyBluebell

    DaisyBluebell Earth, the insane asylum of the Universe

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    DITTO everything said. Poor little mite must be totally stressed, removed from everything she knew to virtually nothing, how very sad.
     
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  13. Rebeccac92

    Rebeccac92 PetForums Junior

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    I am really grateful for everyone's replies but some of them are making me really bad and making me out as if I am being really cruel to her.
    She seems really happy to myself and only seems to cry when we leave her to go to bed which I presume to be perfectly normal.
    We both give her loads of love and cuddles it's during the day we are struggling with.

    Last night I left her in the utility room with her crate unlocked and there is definitely enough space for her there and did not whimper once and had weed on her pad. As soon as she woke up she had a poo outside so I feel like she's getting more used to us now
     
  14. BeauBeau

    BeauBeau PetForums Junior

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    I am getting a puppy in two weeks and I took two weeks off work plus third week working from home to help him adjust, to train him, etc. Despite what some people say, and bravo to them, a lot of people who take on dogs, even more so puppies, don´t have perfect conditions for it. They live in apartments, no access to garden space, work full time, don´t prepare themselves for the hard work it is, etc. But they do it and dogs survive and end up being nice, healthy, sociable dogs. Ofcourse it would be perfect if we all had the right conditions to bring home a puppy, but we don´t. If we all waited to have those perfect conditions, I am sure a lot less people would have dogs. Having said that, and based on some real struggles my friends went through when they took on puppies (lack of sleep, long housebreaking periods, peeing in house accidents for weeks and weeks, chewed furniture, distressed puppies) I didn´t want to make it harder for my soon to be puppy nor myself. I would much rather spend two weeks by the sea on holiday with friends than at home, but the reward will be the time I will spend with my puppy. We will bond and get to know each other. Just think how hard it is for them to be separated from their family, their mummy, their hurd, to find themselves somewhere new and unknown. My breeders warned me that he might be quite subdue the first few days, until he gets over the separation, but that is quite normal. I plan to be with him 24 hours a day first ten days at least. That means, either with me in my arms or playing around, walking outside, crate training, sleeping (in his crate), taking him out after his naps and eating, and I will sleep on the sofa in the room where his crate will be the first 2-3 nights. Gradually, I will make myself less visible at night times. Anyway, your situation won´t get better until you invest more time. It might, he will learn, eventually, but very slowly, and you will have a lot more peeing accidents, less sleep and your puppy will show distress in one way or another until you shower him with what he needs. You! :)
     
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  15. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    I think a bit of reading matter will help you over the next few months as you appear to have not had a dog before

    The Perfect Puppy
    By Gwen Bailey

    It can be downloaded if you have a Kindle or the Kindle App
     
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  16. Rebeccac92

    Rebeccac92 PetForums Junior

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    Thank you for that :)
     
  17. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Do you know what..many people wait till the time is right to get puppies...this could be years, just ask valued members of the forum @SusieRainbow and @steveshanks

    Also many people do, do exactly what you suggest and go out and get a puppy, and you know what fail miserably. The dog has no life because of it or ends up if it's lucky just ends up in rescue maybe for a few weeks, maybe months or maybe years.

    It's not so much about perfect conditions, but the right time...and doing things wrong at an early age can do so much harm. When you think your puppy has well adjusted because they have stopped howling, it could be they have shut down..no one wants a puppy to do that.

    No one condones people who work full time to get puppies, many people have to, to afford them but timing has to be considered...it's really looking at the bigger picture. I absolutely agree, people make it work...but many struggle or simply get over dogged to quickly.
     
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  18. Blitz

    Blitz PetForums VIP

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    This all sounds very nice but if you are with your puppy all the time you are making a huge mistake and setting the puppy up for quite a problem. From day one leave your pup alone for at least a few minutes and up to an hour, every day even if you dont actually need to go somewhere. Why would your pup think it is ok to be suddenly left when you go back to work. You have to train them and get them used to small amounts of time. My pups have always been left for an hour or so from day one and I have never had a dog that minds being left.
     
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  19. BeauBeau

    BeauBeau PetForums Junior

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    Oh, of course I will. I didn´t mean literally 24 hours a day. My breeders also advised up to one hour from day one in order to avoid separation anxiety later on.
     
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