Welcome to PetForums

Join thousands of other pet owners and pet lovers on the UK's most popular and friendly pet community and discussion forum.

Sign Up

New puppy 10 weeks onwards

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by Alcauni, Jul 19, 2017.


  1. Alcauni

    Alcauni PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2017
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    We are currently making links with breeders such that we can hopefully get a golden retriever (very exciting times ahead).

    We have found a really lovely breeder and the parents have brilliant pedigree and health.

    The puppies are due at the end of August and therefore will be 8 weeks at the end of Oct.

    We're due to go on holiday the first week in November and so the Puppy would be 9.5 weeks when we collect her.

    We've done lots of puppy book reading and everything says never collect a puppy that is older than 8 weeks unless you know it's been very well socialised. Obviously the breeder can't guarantee it will have had lots of attention as it's possible there may be the odd other puppy left. We really want to hit the ground running with training and know that from 8-12 weeks there is a precious window in which you can socialise your puppy.

    Would collecting a puppy at 10 weeks be a big no no? Should it make much of a difference to our puppies development and should we find a better timed litter?

    Really does seem a shame to lose the links we have with this seemingly good breeder.
     
  2. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Messages:
    16,002
    Likes Received:
    19,963
    I think you should chat to the breeder and see what he or she is prepared to do .
    Over the years the age of pups leaving their mum's has changed , it used to 6 weeks then up to 8 and up to 12 weeks and then back down again.
     
  3. Sled dog hotel

    Sled dog hotel PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2010
    Messages:
    39,822
    Likes Received:
    10,365
    Socialisation and habituation needs to go on through puppy hood and adolescence and beyond into adulthood, it is true however that during the first 16 weeks of a pups life they do go through many critical stages of development.
    A good breeder should introduce their puppies to things and handle them right from early on and a certain amount of things should have been done on a regular basis before you taken ownership. If the breeder is doing these things then picking pup up a couple of weeks later shouldn't be an issue.

    You can read about the importance of socialisation and there is also plans for 0-8 weeks which is things breeders should have done, and 8 to 16 weeks under the new owners section on the link below.

    http://www.thepuppyplan.com/

    Also when you say the pups have a brilliant pedigree and health, Have the parents had specific tests carried out prior to breeding and not just the normal veterinary health checks. Good breeders will carry out these tests for known health issues in the breed have certificates and be happy to discuss the results with you. Tests available for Golden retriever are:-

    BVA/KC Health Schemes: www.bva.co.uk/chs
    • Eye disease: Multi-focal retinal dysplasia (MRD) (litter screening); Hereditary cataract (HC) (annual testing); Progressive retinal atrophy (PRA) (annual testing) (gradual loss of vision); Goniodysgenesis/Primary glaucoma (G) (annual testing)
    • Hip Dysplasia (malformation of the hip joints causing pain and disability): breed mean score 13.3 (parents should be lower) Is a serious problem for the breed and ideally the score should be much lower than the breed mean score.
    • Elbow dysplasia (malformation of the elbow joint causing pain and disability: (swollen, painful elbows and lameness) Score of parents should ideally be 0:0 or as low as possible. A common problem for this breed.
    DNA Tests Available

    • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA prcd)
    • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (GR_PRA1)
    • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (GR_PRA2)
    • Muscular Dystrophy (MD)
    • Degenerative Myelopathy (DM)
    • Ichthyosis (ICT-A)
    • Dystrophic Epidermolysis Bullosa (DEB)
    Unofficial (Breed Club) Schemes
    • Bitches under 18 months not to produce a litter
    • Bitches not to produce more than one litter in a 12-month period

    You can read more about Golden retriever health and more about the tests on the full link below

    http://www.dogbreedhealth.com/golden-retriever/
     
    Alcauni and kimthecat like this.
  4. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10,725
    Likes Received:
    12,914
    It's not the end of the world, no, if you are happy with the breeder. I'm presuming the holiday can't be moved? in which case if everything else adds up and you are completely happy with the breeder, then I'd go ahead with current plans.......
     
  5. Alcauni

    Alcauni PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2017
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks Kimthecat,

    The breeder has said she has kept puppies for longer where necessary and treats them like members of the family. It's just that current literature seems to warn against it that worries me.

    I suppose if they haven't been fully vaccinated there is so much they/ we can do anyway I imagine other than exposing them to an array of household/ garden noises and experiences.


     
  6. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10,725
    Likes Received:
    12,914
    To be honest what you've been reading is probably nature v nurture stuff......

    Puppies are in my opinion predominately a product of their genetics which are then shaped and influenced by the environment. A well bred Golden is usually pretty bomb proof and easy going as far as dogs go, and if the breeder is decent then them staying there for an extra couple of weeks really wouldn't concern me. My Labrador although we got him at 8 weeks was kennel bred, hadn't stepped foot in a house until we got him home, and was as bombproof as they came...as I said, genetics!

    If you had a really specialised breed then I'd say get the pup as young as possible, but as that isn't the case.....
     
    Jamesgoeswalkies and kimthecat like this.
  7. Alcauni

    Alcauni PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2017
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you sled dog hotel.

    Really helpful information. From what we've seen they're are all health test certificates etc for the 'usual' golden retriever tests.

    I hadn't come across the puppy plan before that's very helpful thanks.

    Is it cheeky for me to be asking a breeder if she is following a plan such as this in terms of socialisation? I know that they obviously expect the health questions etc.
     
  8. Alcauni

    Alcauni PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2017
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    That's interesting Labradrk
    I'd always though that it was nurture that played a bigger part than nature. Or at least that's how these books read. That's certainly something we'll keep in mind!
     
  9. Rafa

    Rafa PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Jun 18, 2012
    Messages:
    14,424
    Likes Received:
    21,689

    There is a limit to how much socialisation a Breeder can be expected to give a litter of pups.

    I used to get my litters accustomed to children, other dogs, (mine), the sound of television, vacuum, etc., and they were also taken to the Vets before they left me. They also used to spend time outside in the garden, where they could hear cars, motorbikes, etc.

    It would not be reasonable to expect a Breeder to take pups out and about, they would have to be carried, and that isn't really realistic, particularly if the litter is large.

    I brought my Jack Russell home at ten weeks and she is perfectly alright.
     
    Jamesgoeswalkies likes this.
  10. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2012
    Messages:
    13,842
    Likes Received:
    22,049
    I delayed picking up a puppy for a couple of weeks, also a golden, and she was absolutely fine. The breeders were used to keeping a pup a little longer and were well versed in making sure she had plenty of experiences within the home and out in the garden. They also had ten adult dogs of both sexes, so she got to meet all of them. This was over 30 years ago and she was my first GR. She was virtually house trained when we picked her up which was an added bonus and a very happy easy going puppy, never had any problems with her whatsoever. As @labradrk said, a well bred golden from parents with good temperaments is probably going to be absolutely fine.

    As an aside we couldn't cancel the holiday as we were moving to a new area and needed to view properties.
     
  11. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Messages:
    16,002
    Likes Received:
    19,963
    If that is the case and they are exposed to household noises then I wouldn't worry .
    Well done for being a responsible future puppy owner. :)
     
  12. labradrk

    labradrk PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Dec 10, 2012
    Messages:
    10,725
    Likes Received:
    12,914
    Depends what you read. Remember that research/thoughts/knowledge move on all the time, books especially get outdated pretty quickly.
     
    kimthecat likes this.
  13. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2012
    Messages:
    13,842
    Likes Received:
    22,049
    having had four Goldens all from different breeders I can confirm that nature does play a big part in your puppies personality. Temperament is largely inherited and I made a bit of a mistake when I bought my last dog, I should have paid more attention to the behaviour of the mother and an older puppy from a previous mating using the same dogs. But you live and learn.



    Would be by very nice to see some pictures when you bring her home
     
    kimthecat likes this.
  14. kimthecat

    kimthecat PetForums VIP

    Joined:
    Aug 11, 2009
    Messages:
    16,002
    Likes Received:
    19,963
    I was shocked when I first went on line some years back and read of aggressive GRs in the US . The ones I have met in the UK have had lovely temperaments so I hope the breed in the UK doesn't go the same way .
     
  15. Alcauni

    Alcauni PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2017
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi Sweaty thanks for your message.
    If I'm honest that is all that we would expect if not more.
    My only concern would be that if worst case scenario there were say 3 or 4 pups left that the dog wouldn't learn to be part of a family. I imagine this will be unlikely as it seems previously all of the pups have been reserved before 8 weeks.
    The books have been suggesting that a pup in the house at ten weeks will struggle to adapt if it's only been around it's mum, litter mates and the breeder every now and again. I appreciate the breeder won't give our pup as much attention as we would if there our other pups left plus her own two dogs. So I suppose our worry is, will this be detrimental to the dogs early socialisation?

    From what you said about taking the pup out in a satchel or similar. This is something some books also advise. I would still worry there would be risk of infection etc/ what if it needed to go to the toilet?! Is this.something people have done with a very young puppy? Prior to the second injection?

    Thanks ever so much for all the advice everyone!
     
  16. Alcauni

    Alcauni PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2017
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0

    Thanks Siskin.
    Once the pups are born we will have the opportunity to meet Mum and an older dog from a litter two years ago so that should be telling if the temperament. We've seen lots of videos of a Facebook group of the pair and they do seem like big softies so hopefully that is the case!

    Ha pictures will certainly follow although it will be a wait yet unfortunately!
     
  17. Alcauni

    Alcauni PetForums Newbie

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2017
    Messages:
    17
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you siskin.
    This is really reassuring.

    We can't cancel our holiday either unfortunately. We are visiting family and just couldn't take a new puppy with us, it would be wholly irresponsible and unfair. The breeder original thought her bitch would come into season a few weeks later which would have worked perfectly although she had mentioned that the bitch wasn't always predictable with her seasons. True to form timings haven't been ideal for us.

    It seems as though good breeders that are reasonably local are a rare breed (excuse the pun). We don't mind travelling but couldn't put a new pup through a really long journey on their first experience away from Mum.

     
  18. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2012
    Messages:
    13,842
    Likes Received:
    22,049
    There has been a lot written about poor temperament issues in US Goldens. I think some of it came about when very light coloured goldens were introduced to the U.S. and they immediately became very popular. They are known as English Creams although they didn't all come from the UK, some were from other parts of Europe. The puppy farmers got hold of them and started willy nilly breeding, there was also a famous line of Goldens in the UK that had temperament issues and that may have played a part too.
    Most Goldens bred in the UK by the good breeders have pretty good temperaments, but you still need to be careful and be aware.
     
    kimthecat likes this.
  19. bumbarrel

    bumbarrel PetForums Senior

    Joined:
    Feb 23, 2017
    Messages:
    423
    Likes Received:
    606
    One idea I would add. If you intend using a crate with your puppy it would be worth seeing if you can leave one with the breeder (including bedding that smells of you) so that your pup and the others have access to it. If your pup is left as only puppy you could ask the breeder to specifically use it as his bed before you collect him, he doesn't need to be shut in it, just be happy to go in and out.

    That way he will be used to a crate and your scent. My puppy breeder did this for me and it gave us a good start on crate use.
     
    kimthecat likes this.
  1. This site uses cookies to help personalise content, tailor your experience and to keep you logged in if you register.
    By continuing to use this site, you are consenting to our use of cookies.
    Dismiss Notice