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New puppies & stomach issues

Discussion in 'Dog Chat' started by simplysardonic, Jan 11, 2021.


  1. simplysardonic

    simplysardonic Moderator
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    Just curious as I've noticed on here, & I'm seeing it increasingly on Facebook groups, in the sheer number of new owners whose puppies have persistent diarrhoea/sickness/stomach issues.

    It's been 8 years since I raised Rogue & I don't remember her having diarrhoea when first arriving, or any issues from being transferred to raw from kibble, but I can appreciate that some pups may have some issues with loose stools with these big changes in their lives.

    But loose stools isn't really an issue & shouldn't last more than a day, maybe 2.

    And at what stage would you say it was persistent diarrhoea?

    It's concerning that some people are advising using stool firming supplements when this may mask the problem & prolong seeking treatment, especially as a lot of these recently purchased puppies have more than likely come from less than ideal conditions & low welfare breedings.

    So how long do people feel is acceptable to leave puppies before seeking advice from a vet, given that puppies can go downhill quickly?
     
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  2. Happy Paws2

    Happy Paws2 PetForums VIP

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    It's a shock for a puppies leaving their Mom and coming a strange home and strange people no wonder they ave upset tummies. we kept Dillon on the food the breeder was feeding him, but also gave him some scrambled egg. After a few days his tummy settled, if it hadn't I'd phone the vet.
     
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  3. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    When Loki came he had a couple of soft poops but no diarrhoea. We transferred his food slowly. I would have been straight down the vets if he had no risking it.
     
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  4. StormyThai

    StormyThai Moderator
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    Personally if the pup has diarrhea for 24 hours then I would be phoning the vet for advice due to the risk of dehydration.
    There does appear to be a lot of Gardia and Parvo around at the moment.
     
  5. Nonnie

    Nonnie PetForums VIP

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    Half the time i think its because these puppies come from questionable breeders as so few people research before buying a puppy.

    How many times do we read about puppies have heavy worm burdens and giardia? I wonder how many people actually feed what the breeder was, or are even given a bag when they collect their pup.

    Sloppy poo for 48 hours wouldnt worry me. Anything thats like liquid would be a vet visit. I wouldnt be palmed off with 'try chicken and rice' or a tube of prokolin either. I would want a fecal test and probably some antibiotics and/or wormers until the results are back.

    But then i wouldnt buy a puppy from the free ads. Its amazing how many look sickly when purchased too.
     
  6. Boxer123

    Boxer123 PetForums VIP

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    For £3500 per puppy I’d be disappointed if it didn’t poop gold.
     
  7. simplysardonic

    simplysardonic Moderator
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    Yes, there seem to be a lot more posts regarding giardia recently.

    Golden dog eggs:Hilarious
     
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  8. Sarah H

    Sarah H Grand Empress of the Universe

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    I know right???

    I think that these lockdown 'breeders' don't actually know what they are doing, and the puppies aren't the height of health they should be. A bit of slop wouldn't bother me if it was a couple of days, but much longer or if it was liquid I'd be worried.
    It is stressful for pups to leave everything they know, but at the same time dogs in general are pretty resilient and adaptable.
     
  9. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    There's sloppy, loose poop and there's diarrhea, I'm okay with sloppy/loose poop in a puppy, diarrhea not so much.
    And I'm old school. None of our puppies have been transitioned slowly, I don't keep them on the same food they were on (most are foundling pups anyway). Also my vet does a fecal as a routine new puppy exam.
     
  10. SingingWhippet

    SingingWhippet PetForums VIP

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    Pretty much this. I'd expect maybe a few days of slightly soft poop but certainly not any diarrhea.

    I honestly can't remember what my eldest (adopted as a pup from a rescue 13 years ago) was like when I brought her home but the four who came from breeders had maybe a few soft poops over their first few days here and that's it. They also had no issues at all being swapped pretty quickly onto my diet of choice. They did all had quite similar diets whilst they were still with their respective breeders; primarily a decent dry puppy food but they were also introduced to all sorts including wet foods, different meats (raw and cooked), eggs, tinned fish, etc.. I wonder how much of an impact the diet they have with their breeder has on their 'gut resilience' for want of a better phrase.

    Interestingly none of mine have ever been fussy either, they'll eat (and enjoy) pretty much anything put in front of them.
     
  11. Siskin

    Siskin Look into my eyes....

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    I agree with you over getting puppies from questionable puppies is the likely cause. Read this morning about a GR pup who came home and within days was at the vets with Parvo, she died last night poor little soul. Looking at the picture posted of the pup she didn’t look to be an 8 week old unless the picture was when she was still at the breeders
     
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  12. LotsaDots

    LotsaDots PetForums Senior

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    My pup came to me at 8 weeks having been on pedigree puppy, I changed his food straight away and haven't had an issue since (he's 6 months now) Yes the odd loose/soft poo but never diarrhea and he hasn't been sick once. Maybe it's luck or because he's a pretty hardy little Jack Russell. I'd allow a couple of days diarrhea as long as they are drinking but tiny puppies can go downhill very fast must be scary.
     
  13. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    Archer didn't have any issues at all when he first came to live with me. Kato was here a week then had really bad diarrhoea. It started in the night & we were up every 2hrs .... I was shattered the next day. I was in daily contact with his breeder & after 24hs spoke to the vets.

    He was well in himself, drinking/eating well but I put him on boiled chicken & white rice for 48hrs (also added probiotics to his meals). He was fine within 36 hrs. Not sure why it happened but he's been fine since
     
    #13 Cleo38, Jan 11, 2021
    Last edited: Jan 12, 2021
  14. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    Late to the party.

    It was getting really bad here, in health and nutrition that people had got insert puppies age under 12 weeks, with blood, mucus and diarrhea. Looking for a food for their pup as vet said it must be food..

    I have never known a vet in my experience of going with colitis to want to change food when we are trying treatment etc. It's giving too many variables, and I also have never known a vet to suggest to a young puppy have chicken and rice. This is where the gastrointestinal prescription diet is needed for additional nutrients for a growing 'baby' dog. Far more nutrient rich than chicken and rice. Older dogs fine but not those so young.

    I would say for sure a vet would consider antibiotics as standard for a young puppy.

    As @Nonnie says giardia is rife, and can also be hard to get rid of and hard to detect too.

    As for my own dogs, whilst I do have a couple with intolerances. Plus I advocate changing slowly, I have changed foods quicker and added foods and they have been fine.
     
  15. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    Well mine did & they are great vets. I feed raw usually but this was suggested. I doubt that feeding a puppy a very bland diet for such a short space of time (48hrs in my case) would be detrimental to their health especially as he was drinking plenty & was very lively in himself
    Having looked at ingredients of commercial dogs food (even the prescription ones) they are not something I would personally choose for my dogs but I suppose in some cases these are beneficial.
     
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  16. O2.0

    O2.0 PetForums VIP

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    You know, speaking of good breeding practices (or not good as it seems a lot of these puppies come from less than stellar breeders), I've thought for a while now that breeders seem to not think much about digestive health.
    In the late 60's early 70's my mom bred a few litters of GSDs. Commercial dog food was not ubiquitous back then, certainly not in developing countries where she was, and the dogs ate mainly grains (rice, barley, oats) and whatever offal was available for cheap at the butchers. Some knuckle bones, whatever leftovers the humans were willing to part with, and that's about it. They all did great on this diet. I was young, but I don't remember any stomach issues, certainly not long term issues. All our dogs were walking stomachs. You offered it, they ate it.

    Now you hear about GSDs being known for having sensitive stomachs. Not just GSDs, many breeds are known for having iffy stomachs, and needing special diets, like it's a *thing* with that breed. And we just accept it, nod, and go along with the breeder's recommendation to only feed this and that because these dogs are special and can only handle this kind of food.

    Is that okay? I'm not sure how I feel about that.
    Dogs are scavengers. Shouldn't they be able to eat just about anything? Should we be okay with a breed being known for stomach issues? Or should conscientious breeders be trying to actively breed away from dogs who struggle with things like IBS, colitis, food allergies and serious sensitivities?

    Or maybe we should go back to feeding dogs mainly grains with a few bits of offal thrown in :D:Spiderman
     
  17. LotsaDots

    LotsaDots PetForums Senior

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    My parents bred a few litters of GSDs aswell must be 30 years ago now and apparently never had any issues. Mum used to feed all her dogs on tripe the proper stuff, the smell would fill our kitchen it was gross but the dogs all did well on it. I think like you say it's something that seems to have developed over time, similar to humans I guess. There are lots of people now with allergies and intolerances which was very rarely heard of a few years ago.
     
  18. Cleo38

    Cleo38 PetForums VIP

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    I think there's many things to consider tho ... I think now we are more aware of our dogs & their behaviour than maybe previously. Maybe breeding in some lines has created unintentional gastro issues, maybe the commercial foods themselves create problems, maybe more dogs are suffering anxiety/stresses which might be contributory. I don't know, I didn't have dogs growing up so have limited experience.

    All my dogs so far have never had any issues really & eat everything & anything. We are all greedy b*gggers in this house. I am also the sort of person who can eat anything & not get any issues whereas my sister has varying issues. If I get sick it tends to be ENT rather than gastro.

    Years ago I went to India & seemed to be the only person who actually put on weight (nearly a stone in 3wks!), no Dehli belly at all as I seem to have a cast iron stomach :rolleyes::D
     
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  19. lullabydream

    lullabydream PetForums VIP

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    I do think we are quick to judge food as a problem as a whole as it's such an emotive issue. Once you have got your dog, the genetics are already there. We then have the nature vs nurture debate so one thing we can do as an owner in are heads is feed are dogs the best for health and you know put odds in our favour at maintain health.
    So are dog has upset stomach, flaky skin, Itching oh my god its us, we fed x, y or z we can change it fix it etc. People never seem to think if there is a problem there is another reason, such as environment, parasites, microbes its always food or lack of nutrients so we must add or do something to the food. I mean for an example when I joined here all I heard about was apple cider vinegar this, apple cider vinegar that.. Am not saying you shouldn't use it or anything but it was like you weren't a good dog owner if your dog didn't get apple cider vinegar with the mother of course, the coconut oil...

    I don't think there is anything wrong with grains, or high carbohydrate laden foods. If people understood and could read labels and not marketing then to be fair, most foods most people do feed and are recommended here are high on carbs anyway. I don't get what's bad about dogs getting lots of b vitamins from rice which is important for them, maize getting lots of nutrients such as magnesium, manganese and folic acid. Maybe you are right @O2.0 that grains should be making a presidence again in foods. Or going back to foods which mix up the ingredients from day to day so dogs can't build up intolerances as they do. Unfortunately we don't know what the dogs are eating but the dogs don't care. It's something I myself would struggle with but it's worth thinking about.
     
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  20. CheddarS

    CheddarS PetForums VIP

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    It’s really interesting topic. My older dog has a sensitive stomach but have worked out it is processed food. He is fine with raw, and scavenges dead stuff but when he has too much refined food goes straight through him.... my puppy eats anything and everything and can’t get enough in him!
     
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