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New landlord doesn't allow pets -- can they force me to get rid of my cat?!

Discussion in 'Cat Chat' started by noth1ngness, Jan 30, 2019.


  1. noth1ngness

    noth1ngness PetForums Newbie

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    In my tenancy agreement contract with my current landlord, it says that pets are allowed as long as tenants seek permission. My landlord told me they don't care one way or the other if I get a cat or not, so this month I was finally going to be adopting one. However, I was just told today that within 4 months, my building will be taken over by a new letting company, and these new people don't want to allow pets at all. My current landlord has told me that my cat might be a problem to these new landlords, even though it's not a problem for him. He also told me that he's already mentioned to these new landlords that no one in the building has any pets. He then told me that he won't let the new landlords know about my cat, that he's willing to pretend that he didn't know about it.

    So -- if I do adopt a cat this month, once my landlord changes over to this new letting company, will they have the legal right to tell me to get rid of my cat??? I desperately want to adopt a cat this month and I absolutely do not want to move because I love my flat. But I don't want to be told in 4 months time that I need to get rid of my cat. I could never give up a pet like that. Would they even be legally allowed to demand that of me?

    Any insights at all into the laws around this would be so appreciated xx I'm having trouble getting any answers through google xx
     
  2. Summercat

    Summercat PetForums VIP

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    I think @Paddypaws has given advice on this subject before.

    I am not sure but I think it would have been better if the landlord told the new owners you had a cat and he had agreed.
     
  3. Acidic Angel

    Acidic Angel Your ego does not surpass your pets wellbeing

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    I'm afraid I can't really help much with the question, but this concerns me. Particularly the bit I've highlighted in red...
    If the landlord was to say he was unaware of your cat, despite being fully aware you were planning to adopt one, it reflects badly on you and paints you in a bad light with a habit of not seeking permission for things, etc...
    It basically sounds like he's more concerned about himself than what are currently his tennants.

    I personally would not trust this at all.
     
  4. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    I would imagine if you had a pet which you didn't declare, depending on your contract, they could insist you remove the cat or serve you notice to quit which you obviously don't want, particularly as you were aware of their rules before you got a cat. Also, if you did have one they didn't know about, what would you do if they were coming to inspect the flat at any time, though I know they have to give you notice. As you haven't already got a cat, I really don't think its worth going against them. Much as you like your flat, you might have to consider moving to somewhere pets are allowed.
     
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  5. Rufus15

    Rufus15 ~ Orrono Maine Coons ~

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    No legally they are not allowed to enforce you to rehome your pet. They can intimidate and cajole but if you get your cat under your current landlord, your new landlord cannot enforce it
     
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  6. Charity

    Charity Endangered Species

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    I suggest the thing to do would be to get some advice from the CAB to make the situation clear.
     
    ewelsh and kimthecat like this.
  7. Mutant

    Mutant PetForums Newbie

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    It might help to have some evidence of your current landlord agreeing to you getting a cat?
     
    kimthecat likes this.
  8. Paddypaws

    Paddypaws PetForums VIP

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    But, they could issue a section 21 eviction notice.
    It’s a very strange situation though as I don’t think the agent could evict without the landlord agreeing.
    Are you ground floor? Garden? Even then I would want a firm commitment from actual owner that you were allowed a pet.
     
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  9. Linda Weasel

    Linda Weasel PetForums VIP

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    Would it be possible to contact the prospective new landlord, maybe exaggerate a bit and say you already have a cat ( with the current landlords permission) and see what they say?
     
    ewelsh and kimthecat like this.
  10. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    @noth1ngness

    Sorry, I'm a bit confused.:confused: You say the building is being "taken over within 4 months by a new letting company" but then further on you refer to "new landlords" which implies the building is being sold by the current owner (landlord) to a new owner (landlord). Presumably a new landlord might appoint a new letting agent to deal with the tenants, collect rents etc. . but I can't see how the letting agent would be dictating the terms of the lease. IME, it is normally the responsibility of the landlord to instruct their letting agent what terms they require in the tenancy agreements, not for the letting agent to dictate the terms.

    If the new landlords have stipulated a "no pets' rule in the building and your current landlord has told the new landlord that none of the tenants has a pet, then if you're going to go ahead and adopt a cat before the ownership of the building changes hands, you need to get firm permission from the current landlord (preferably in writing). Then really the current landlord should advise the new landlord of the changed situation, so it does not come as a surprise to them when they take over the ownership.

    If it is in fact the new letting agent that has stipulated "no pets" then find out who the new landlord will be and write a letter to them asking for permission to have a cat.

    I wouldn't do anything underhand, just be straight with everyone. Offer to pay an extra deposit (to be transferred to the new landlord) if necessary to cover any damage your cat might cause in your property. But ultimately if you are refused permission, personally I wouldn't risk getting a cat. It would be awful if you had to choose between getting rid of the cat to keep your flat, or moving so you could keep the cat.
     
  11. Vanessa131

    Vanessa131 PetForums VIP

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    A lot of rescues will ask for a letter of permission from a landlord when allowing a renter to adopt an animal, so that could be an issue.
     
  12. Lurcherlad

    Lurcherlad PetForums VIP

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    Why risk it?

    There are countless threads on here trying to rehome cats and dogs because of housing issues.

    To take on a cat in these circumstances would be a very bad idea (for the cat) in my view.
     
    lorilu, ewelsh, AmsMam and 6 others like this.
  13. MilleD

    MilleD PetForums VIP

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    The problem with this is that the deposit protection schemes now give the deposit far less value to the landlord than it used to.

    In fact a some landlords are beginning to not take deposits as it isn't worth the hassle when all you do is get into a battle the landlord can't win.
     
    chillminx likes this.
  14. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    You're right, and also I'd forgotten about the new legislation which will limit the size of the deposit a landlord can demand. I think this must make it harder now to persuade a reluctant landlord to take a punt on allowing a tenant to own a cat.
     
  15. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    Does the law prevent a tenant offering a bigger deposit than the landlord can demand?
     
  16. chillminx

    chillminx PetForums VIP

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    I suppose not, but that would in a way seem to go against the spirit of the "Tenant Fees Bill" and maybe a reputable landlord might prefer to refuse such an offer for fear of later being accused by a tenant of demanding a financial inducement to let the property to them.

    https://www.gov.uk/government/collections/tenant-fees-bill
     
  17. MilleD

    MilleD PetForums VIP

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    I think it might. The deposit would still need protecting, and you wouldn't be able to protect more than the law states I imagine.
     
    chillminx likes this.
  18. OrientalSlave

    OrientalSlave Shunra Oriental Cats

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    True, probably not possible.
     
  19. MissMiloKitty

    MissMiloKitty PetForums VIP

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    This is not the right time to take on a cat. If the new Landlords won't permit pets and you really want a cat, then you can look for a pet friendly property .
    If look for a property before you get a cat then you can take your time and wait for the right one for you. If you already have a cat and you are told to leave or rehome, then you have a very limited time to find a property and a lot of people don't find one in time and end up having to rehome their pet. Not fair, but that's how it is.

    Hopefully your new Landlords will be able to do a deal with you such as a Pet deposit . If you are a good tenant then they may not want to let you go, especially if you have been there a while. People with pets are more likely to settle and stay long term.
     
  20. noth1ngness

    noth1ngness PetForums Newbie

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    This is very belated, but thank you guys all so much for your considered replies! I have decided not to go about this in any kind of shady way, and I got my current landlord to agree and write me an email stating that I have permission to keep a cat. Now, I am just nervous about the new landlords trying to force me to get rid of the cat even if I show them written permission from my previous landlord, so I am still seeking more information.

    Anyone have any other info about this? Is it legal for a new landlord taking over a building to force eviction of pets accepted under previous landlords??

    I'm sorry to have written so confusingly:oops: My bad! My building is indeed being taken over by a new letting company but also by new landlords. I should have just talked about the new landlords and not mentioned anything about letting companies, because now after doing some reading, I understand that letting companies just manage a building on the landlords' behalf, and they don't make any decisions on terms of a lease and all that. (I'm from Canada originally, so I was a bit confused before I did some more reading, sorry:Hungover)

    xx
     
    chillminx likes this.
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